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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/11/2022 in all areas

  1. 6 points
    I’ve posted this before, but it is a good reminder: GUN STORE EMPLOYEES ARE NOT PAID OR TRAINED TO GIVE YOU LEGAL ADVICE!! I repeat - GUN STORE EMPLOYEES ARE NOT PAID OR TRAINED TO GIVE YOU LEGAL ADVICE!! Do not rely on gun store employees to keep you out of jail, or to interpret laws for you. They are there to take your money and walk you through some paperwork. Heed their advice at your own risk. They are paid to sell guns and keep the shop out of trouble - NOT YOU. They are not required to have any training or certification in NJ or Federal laws past what is required to take your money, get you through NICS, and get you out the door. There are some good ones that are knowledgeable. It is up to you to vet them, and decide if they are trustworthy. Take legal advice from competent and reputable lawyers*. Preferably one well versed in NJ gun laws. * Yes, that includes taking advice from well meaning members on online Gun Forums as well. Yes, that includes what I wrote above. I am not a lawyer. Accept what I said above at your own risk. If you don’t know, research what you learned and vet what you hear/read here and elsewhere (which sounds exactly like what you are doing. Kudos!) That being said, Krdshark is correct. You are right. They are wrong. (Except for any restrictions on firearms on certain properties - for example a military base)
  2. 5 points
  3. 5 points
    GOV. MURPHY'S ANTI-GUN BILL PACKAGE FIZZLES AS LEGISLATIVE SESSION ENDS Thanks to Gun Owners For Making the Difference! January 11, 2022. Thanks to an overwhelming outcry from law-abiding gun owners, Governor Murphy's much-touted anti-gun bill package fizzled as the 2020-2021 legislative session ended. Your efforts made the difference, and the current outcome proves that no matter how overwhelming the odds, no matter how futile it may seem, the outcome of every legislative battle is never written in stone and the collective effort of gun owners and sportsmen can make the difference. That being said, a new two-year legislative session is now beginning, and the anti-gun bill package will likely be resurrected all over again as the session unfolds. But in this upcoming session, new national standards could be set by the U.S Supreme Court (in the pending right to carry case) that greatly clarify the boundaries of what is permissible generally in laws restricting Second Amendment rights. That could affect misguided proposals like Governor Murphy's, which fail to punish gun crime and instead restrict the rights of honest citizens who have nothing to do with crime. In the meanwhile, gun owners should enjoy a well-deserved short break in the action, as the legislative session resets and the gradual bill introduction process begins all over again. Enjoy the moment, but be prepared to go into action once again in the not-too-distant future. Click the link below for the online version of this alert: https://www.anjrpc.org/page/Murphys2AAttacksFizzleasSessionEnds?fbclid=IwAR2VNycJm-0uotT_QFoMVpRjrq-5o7lurGyXBT-NWqjFBt5ZnPbx7U4NZEs
  4. 4 points
  5. 4 points
    I've said it before and I'll say it again. NJ Stautes, for the law abiding gun owner, only cover where you can possess hollowpoints. They say nothing about where you can use them.
  6. 4 points
  7. 4 points
  8. 4 points
  9. 4 points
    You're confusing her with AOC.
  10. 3 points
  11. 3 points
  12. 3 points
  13. 3 points
    That paragraph describes the method of securing a firearm when being transported under a number of clauses in that section. You have to read the whole thing. It begins with: So look back to see what 2C:39-5 says about handguns and rifles/shotguns: Note the 2 underlined parts. If you have a permit to carry a handgun, possession of a handgun is not a crime. Therefore, you cannot be exempted, because there is no offence to be exempted from. However, almost nobody ever gets a permit to carry a handgun so almost all of us have to work under the exemptions for handguns. If you have an FPIC, possession of a rifle or shotgun is not a crime. Therefore, you cannot be exempted, because there is no offence to be exempted from. Notice that there is no mention of a loaded handgun, therefore all handguns are treated the same, loaded or not which is how carry permit holders can carry loaded handguns - it is not until you are forced to transport under the exemptions that being unloaded is required for handguns. However, possession of loaded rifles or shotguns is specifically called out as an offence. The thing you may realize from this is that if you have an FPIC, you do not have to adhere to 2C:39-6.g and can have the unloaded rifle or shotgun uncased. That is not to say you wouldn't potentially get jammed up under another charge, such as causing a public alarm or disturbance if you were walking down Main St with it on a sling, but you're not committing a firearms offence per se. Now go back and read what HE and I have said before - do not take my word for any of this. I am not a lawyer and this advice is worth no more than what you paid me for it. Read the whole of 2C:39 and 2C:58 and the relevant parts of the Admin Code, and then decide for yourself whether you believe me or need to ask someone who is actually qualified to explain this.
  14. 3 points
    I did it when I could and am glad I did even though I'm now unemployed. I'm no longer burdened under the groaning weight of NJ taxes and expenses. I'm also in a warm climate where food pretty much grows year round. I don't have a huge winter propane bill and while electric in the summer is costly, my electric bills for this house are STILL lower in the summer than they were in NJ. I've actually been doing handyman work on the side and if I never went back to a full time job, I'd be content. Granted, we were financially prepared to do this and I own two properties one of which is income positive. Every little bit helps. If we have a full societal collapse, I don't think you can live anywhere frankly so this is good enough. Besides, we've seen this happen in other countries and the people are still living there and getting by. I don't have a commute. I don't have state income tax, my property taxes on two homes is less than my Sussex taxes were. I can pluck Bananas off my Sister's tree if I get that hungry. I have a small lemon tree too and we're currently getting bombarded with Oranges :).
  15. 3 points
  16. 3 points
    see how they're villivying her because of her opinions? and her lack of tact in stating the obvious? that is exactly what WE need to start doing to them. we cannot take the high road and be the nice guys. that's been proven to not work. we need to take off the gloves and fight them on their terms.
  17. 3 points
    There's a big controversy about MTG in my house. I think she's beautiful, and my wife thinks I'm nuts. Other politicians I find beautiful: Kristi Noem, Kyrsten Sinema (more so now that she opposes the filibuster). Sorry to derail this thread with my adolescent mind.
  18. 3 points
    There is another thread about vacuum sealers that I participated in and the Food Saver was highly recommended and I purchased it. I couldn't be happier. Get a model that will use the roll bags so you can cut them to a custom size. I purchased this one. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DI342B4?ref=ppx_yo2_dt_b_product_details&th=1
  19. 3 points
  20. 3 points
    No one should eat there. Ever.
  21. 3 points
    Because of the quarantine rules, Not because people are home sick in bed. Another manufactured crisis.
  22. 3 points
    Being prepared isn't a single point on a map. It's a journey and a destination.
  23. 3 points
    I have solar panels on my house. I also used some of my GI Bill money and took some courses on Sustainable Energy, Energy Auditing and HVAC/R. I bought my system outright so I get the SRECs from the power produced instead of a company like Solar City renting my roof and them getting the SRECs. The way the inverters work is like this (in a nut shell): As long as the inverter sees there is stable grid power (something like 240v + or - 5% at 60 hertz for 5 continue minutes), it will convert DC power to AC power. The AC power goes to your house and/or what ever you don't use goes to the transformer on the pole near your house that supplies your house. From there it gets stepped up to match the power on the lines and send down the street to another house on the grid that is drawing power. During a power outage, the inverter must disconnect from the grid to avoid the possibility of sending power down the lines while utility workers are conducting maintenance or repair actions. Since the inverter only changes DC to AC and can't moderate the flow of this power, it either has to send it all somewhere or it has to send all of it nowhere. Thus, if you loose grid power, the inverter will shut down completely (unless you have battery backup system, more on that below). To install a solar system connected to the grid like this requires approved permits from the electric utility company and they only approve systems with inverters that perform this disconnect when grid power goes down. They used to come out and test the disconnect feature on every inverter installed on a house before they allowed the final installation to take place, but now, so many people have solar, they only test a random number of inverters and give test waivers for the rest as long as the inverter model meets code and the installer has done enough installs in the past that passed inspection. Anyway, to maintain use of your solar power when the grid goes down requires a battery system and a power inverter that can isolate the grid connection and reroute inverted power to the battery system, giving your house power "on an island." This is an internal function to the inverter and is a feature that most inverters do not have because it significantly increases the cost of the inverter. Since most people with solar systems don't choose to install batteries, inverter manufacturers don't build it in as a standard option. But it is an available on some models. You can install a grid tied system, then later have the inverter changed and add a battery system, but it's not something the average non-electrician home owner can safely do since you're working with the main power coming into the house from the transformer and you have up to 600v of DC power coming off the solar panels. Also, if you change inverters, your electrician will have to redo the permitting process with the local electric company. Unless you go completely off grid. Most people don't opt to include a battery backup because there is a very significant cost to including a battery system. Besides the inverter being more expensive, batteries, battery charge controllers and the other equipment for the batteries is very expensive. This additional equipment increases installation labor costs. Most people don't go this route unless they are completely off grid. Most grid connected users like having solar energy which gives them little to no electric bill (I pay between $5 and $7 a month), and the stability of the grid at night or during cloudy days. Most people haven't gone a step further and began to prepare for a long term or even permanent involuntary plunge into living off grid like a major SHTF situation could produce. In the grand scheme of things, in the US, the power is really stable and rarely goes out, especially compared to some 3rd world countries. For that reason most people have little reason to believe that will change, let alone begin to spend money to hedge against it. While the batteries can store a lot of power, it wasn't until recently that the battery technology advanced and there are models available that can discharge a decent amount continuous peak power. Even now, they don't put out the amount of power you get from a backup generator. That's another drawback of the battery system. For all the money spent to install it, you have a limited amount of instant available power when the grid goes down. When you compare cost of installation dollars per peak kilowatt hour of available power, a backup generator is almost always economically cheaper to install. For "prepper" purposes, considering the context of this thread, I will acknowledge the generators 2 biggest downsides: It needs fuel and it makes a lot of noise which can attract unwanted attention to the fact that you have power when others don't.
  24. 3 points
    Another year, another Can-Can sale! This is the 2nd week - it runs through Saturday, Jan 15. Their usual suspects are on sale - Progresso soups, Bumblebee solid white tuna, Tutturoso tomatoes, store & name brands of various canned veggies, other convenient shelf-stable food like pasta/name brand mac & cheese mixes, etc. - along with sales on many other items including Lysol products, paper goods, fresh foods, etc. It's a pretty extensive list. Not everything is a HUGE discount, so check your prices. That said, there are a number of items that are a dollar or more off per item as compared to regular pricing. So, that's definitely worth checking out, especially as inflation skyrockets. I don't know what their supply/inventory is like... that might differ store to store. They say you eventually turn into your parents, right? Well, I use to laugh (not mean, but teasing) at my dear old dad because he was right on top of each grocery chain's sales, he kept a fully stocked pantry which spilled over into additional cabinets that he added in the laundry room, he kept a filled-to-the-brim chest freezer, he kept common spare parts on hand to fix the toilets, or the furnace, etc. We use to tease him and say he was "getting ready for a nuclear winter". Now that I'm older and wiser, I realize he was just smart, well-prepared, and ahead of his time!
  25. 2 points
    I think Charleston is one of those few places that if you were blindfolded and then dropped off there, you would instantly recognize it. But good lord please don't come to Charleston and eat at an IHOP.
  26. 2 points
    Love Charleston. Be sure to go to the Tattooed Moose and have the duck club. OMG it’s awesome!
  27. 2 points
    You should go. Magnificant old homes/mansions, lots of history, Fort Sumter, carriage ride around the city, plantation tours, restaurants and bars. We stayed on Sea Brook Isand which is only houses, townhomes and some condos. Only the golf course club house. No IHOPs, restaurants, bars, Starbucks...nothing. But Charleston was only about 35 minutes or so away. Relaxed on Sea Brook and when we wanted to we drove into downtown Charleston to sightsee. It would be great to stay in the downtown area but it was my family and my parents. We wanted to spend some time together and didn't want to stay in hotel rooms.
  28. 2 points
    I’ve not been to Charleston. It looks very nice and always ranks among best places to live in news surveys.
  29. 2 points
    I love the “Securely Tied Package” option…. I purchased a used handgun from Meltzer in Garfield a number of years back. No box he just put it in a thin food store type plastic bag and handed it to me.. So I asked “Is this legal”. He said, “Oh no absolutely not”and grabbed the bag back from me.. I assumed he was going to get a box or some sort of case to take it home in…. Nope… He simply looped on carry handle under the other and handed it back…. Saying with a smile. “ Good catch the package must securely tied”
  30. 2 points
  31. 2 points
  32. 2 points
  33. 2 points
    This all day long and twice on Sunday! ESB, you will not get a complete understanding of what the laws are and are not through hearsay. There are more wildly incorrect rumors than there is truth out there. The three worse places you can ask about firearms law are, in no particular order: The gun store The internet (particularly a couple of really, really bad facebook groups) Your buddy who is a cop High Exposure already spelled that out several posts ago. njJoniGuy has said it too. You are responsible for your actions. If you get jammed up for breaking one or more of NJ's ridiculously complex gun laws you can't use the defense that you were told by one of the entities listed above. You're the one that will be paying the lawyers' bills and you'll be the one looking at jail time. Spend the time and do your own reading. Understand the statutes and then read and learn the administrative code too - that describes the rules under which the statutes are enforced. You can find the source material here: Statutes Administrative Code
  34. 2 points
    Every law abiding firearms owner who lives in, or travels into the Glorious Peoples Republik of New Jerseystan should take the time to read and learn the contents of 2C:39 and 2C:58, which are the statutes dealing with the subject of firearms. They can be found at http://njleg.state.nj.us Granted, there are some details that are not elucidated in the statutes, such as transportation of hollow points between residences when moving. I'm not sure they are even covered in the latest edition of Evan Nappen's book on NJ Gun Laws, which is an ok second choice of places to learn what the law says what you cannot do here. But learn the gun laws for yourself. Knowledge is power.
  35. 2 points
    Notwithstanding the list of "sensitive" locations where possession is prohibited (e.g. school, courthouse, federal building, etc.), what makes you think you cannot be in possession of an unloaded rifle having obtained an FPIC? If you do not have an FPIC you have to rely on the exceptions and exemptions. You may own a rifle and possess it an an exempt location, but you can't generally possess it as you travel around the State.
  36. 2 points
    It’s not a thing now. That info comes to HQ from the state on a secure connection. You can’t get that info in a patrol car via MDT lookup.
  37. 2 points
    Just joined, 45 minutes ago. I get a "Malicious Site Warning" from Norton when going to the site linked on the FB page. Stay away!
  38. 2 points
    Should be a lot MORE than 3...
  39. 2 points
    Peel, Actually you are doing quite well and off to a great start based on what you have shared so far. As Sniper stated, it is a journey. Slow and steady wins the race. Thing about about the various emergency scenarios that may affect you, decide what your goals and priorities are, compile a list of the things you need to do/purchase, and then execute on that plan over time. It is developing and maintaining a preparedness mindset that is most important. That will enable to you also recognize emerging risks and act to prepare and mitigate those risks before the general public panics. Moreover, being prepared for what may come is comforting and gives you some semblance of control when unexpected events occur. An example of that mindset was when word of covid first started to rear its head in early 2020, it was a call to action to me to recheck my preps inventory, identify any gaps given the emerging risk(s), and address those needs. At the time, I was as concerned if not more so, about the public's reaction to the news reports, than I was to the virus itself. I vividly remember going to Costco one evening in late Feb/early March 2020 and spending close to $500. After checking out I sat down at one of the food tables and sent a text to my adult children stating in a very serious tone that if they had not yet given thought to emergency preparedness, now was the time to do so. That was a full 2-3 weeks before shortages started to appear. With all that said, I am in much better shape preparedness-wise than I used to be. However not perfect by any means. And lastly, there is one major weak link in all of this that concerns me. That weak link is me. I turn 69 in a few months. While in decent health and wanting to live for another 40 years, the clock of life is ticking. Thanks for reading and hopefully has provided some food for thought.
  40. 2 points
    She's not the first person to be stereotyped and demonized by the media and I am sure she won't be the last.
  41. 2 points
    Hoping you can get some ideas from the following. Of course tailoring it based on your own needs, budget, and planning scenarios. My full list of preps are documented in a detailed spreadsheet whose columns include: Prep Category, Item Name, Description, Purchase Date, Expiration Date, Vendor, Manufacturer, Storage Location (e.g. Carton #), and Quantity on Hand. There are currently approx 260 line items in the spreadsheet. All preps are stored in numbered cartons/bins located in my home and at a separate storage unit. These are all dedicated supplies for use in an emergency. Items with expiration dates (canned foods, batteries, medicines, etc.) are rotated as best as I can with our day to day supplies. I initially developed my ideas of what preps I want to acquire by: 1) My own brain dump while sitting in my cold dark house in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, with a yellow pad, pen, and flashlight; committing to paper all the things I wish I had had. 2) I subsequently read the book "The Disaster Preparedness Handbook-A Guide For Families" by Arthur T. Bradley, cover to cover, with my yellow pad and pen at hand. I routinely follow several preparedness channels on Youtube (City Prepping, Alaska Prepper, Magic Prepper) as well as r/preppers on Reddit, with the goal of continuous learning and identifying any gaps in my preparedness. Prep Categories, with some representative examples of each, include: 1) Communications: Police scanner, Shortwave/Weather/AM/FM radio(s), FRS/GMRS Handheld transceivers, TV antenna and (if required) digital converter box to receive over the air TV. 2) Cooking: Barbecue grill(propane), Coleman Stove(propane canisters), Burton Mr Max Tabletop Stove(butane canisters). 3) Documentation: Manuals for your generator, emergency radios, medical/first aid, etc. 4) Cordage: Clothesline, Paracord, Bungee cords, etc. 5) Electrical: Dual/Tri fuel Generator, Extension cords (e.g. quality ones such as Prime Bulldog Tough), outlet boxes, UPS units for computer/other electronics, power strips/surge protectors, batteries(triple set for every radio, flashlight, smoke and CO detector, etc in my home). 6) Food: well stocked pantry, Canned goods, manual can openers, Longterm Storage Emergency food buckets 7) Fuel: Propane, Gasoline, Matches, Waterproof matches, Cooking sternos, barbecue lighters, fuel transfer hand pump, etc. 8) Hygiene: Body cleansing wipes, Toilet bucket, toilet seat for bucket, Toilet Waste Bags and deodorizer. 9) Lighting: Coleman lanterns, Flashlights, Head mounted flashlights, etc. 10) Medical: First aid items such as bandaids, ace bandages, neosporine, Bleedstop, anti-diarrheals, cold medicines, pain relievers, vitamins, peroxide, rubbing alcohol, etc. 11) Misc: Sealants (e.g. JB Weld, Shoe Goo shoe repair, cauking,etc.) Duct tape, contractor garbage bags, large tarps. 12) Nuclear: (yes I said nuclear, lol) IOSTAT radiation tablets from ANBEX.com, Geiger counter (check Amazon) 13) Safety: Rainproof coveralls, N95 masks, eye safety goggles, heavy duty work gloves, nitrile surgical gloves. 14) Security: All things firearms related, locks, security cables, OC/Mace sprays, whistle. 15) Water: water filters of various types, Water Bob(for tub), water treatment chemicals, fine mesh paint filters(for pre-filtering water), water storage boxes with mylar bags, water siphon, etc. I have not yet researched portable solar panels and solar "generators". That is on my todo list. I do have a Honda EU3000 generator and my house is equipped with a transfer switch(6 circuits). Feel free to ask for any clarification or details related to any of the above. p.s. I do not have a dog. However my home does have a central station fire and burglar alarm system as well as various security cameras.
  42. 2 points
    It's not just airsoft. If anything that resembles a gun, 1920's cap gun, non-functional replica, etc is used in the commission of a crime, weapons charges will ensue because the perp is using said item to give the impression of having a real gun. If you want to stretch it to the extreme, if you loaded a rubber band in your fingers and pointed it at a cop's face, there will be charges (and probably a beat down) because the rubber band is being used as a weapon.
  43. 2 points
    Murphy's attacks on gun owners fail, at least for the previous legislative session Many of you received this today, but I'll post the text here. We have, as the article notes, won a short break in the action. Thanks to all who emailed and called! Be ready for more of the same in 2022. (edit.....I see I was two minutes behind GunForHire's post of the same info) GOV. MURPHY'S ANTI-GUN BILL PACKAGE FIZZLES AS LEGISLATIVE SESSION ENDS Thanks to Gun Owners For Making the Difference! January 11, 2022. Thanks to an overwhelming outcry from law-abiding gun owners, Governor Murphy's much-touted anti-gun bill package fizzled as the 2020-2021 legislative session ended. Your efforts made the difference, and the current outcome proves that no matter how overwhelming the odds, no matter how futile it may seem, the outcome of every legislative battle is never written in stone and the collective effort of gun owners and sportsmen can make the difference. That being said, a new two-year legislative session is now beginning, and the anti-gun bill package will likely be resurrected all over again as the session unfolds. But in this upcoming session, new national standards could be set by the U.S Supreme Court (in the pending right to carry case) that greatly clarify the boundaries of what is permissible generally in laws restricting Second Amendment rights. That could affect misguided proposals like Governor Murphy's, which fail to punish gun crime and instead restrict the rights of honest citizens who have nothing to do with crime. In the meanwhile, gun owners should enjoy a well-deserved short break in the action, as the legislative session resets and the gradual bill introduction process begins all over again. Enjoy the moment, but be prepared to go into action once again in the not-too-distant future.
  44. 2 points
    The key difference between airsoft and BB is that the airsoft ball has a tiny, hollow center. The same applies to paintball - the center is liquid, not solid.
  45. 2 points
    Ammo is the new cash. Nuff said.
  46. 2 points
    unfortunately 2 trips nics is backed up about a week they said. but it is what it is. $549.00 + tax and nics all complete NJ compliant which i asked about having them do if i had one shipped to them, they told me it would cost about 100 bucks to do. so in the end its worth it.
  47. 2 points
    Just got back from quick Costco run. I'm not going to lie. They were COMPLETLY OUT of the artichoke & parmesan cheese dip!! Things are getting bad out there! But seriously, if you aren't stocked up on what you need all it could take is one or two bad storms, another ship getting stuck in the Panama Canal, etc for things to go from a minor inconvenience to pretty bad.
  48. 2 points
    It's funny - we all looked at this over a year ago and decided it wasn't worth it: Now we have re-evaluated and are thinking "maybe..." Since 2022 seems to be the year of second chances, here's a crock pot ribs recipe: https://www.thecookierookie.com/crock-pot-ribs-slow-cooker-ribs/
  49. 2 points
  50. 2 points
    This is a biggie to think about. It also hold true for ALL municipal services. What happens if the water treatment staff is short handed, can't keep the pumps running or they don't have the treatment chemicals? How about the sewer authority, do they have enough staff to keep the crap flowing downhill? Power company, enough staff to keep the lights on, and let's hope we don't get an ice storm. You need to be prepared for any disruption in services. Add in Fire, rescue squad or police. Are YOU prepared? Also, this isn't just because of people being actually sick. It's also the quarantine policies that are keeping the healthy people out of work for 7 - 14 days after exposure.


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