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82flh

owning guns while renting...hmmm

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so im moving back to NJ divorcing and will be renting...

its going to be hard for me with guns in NJ im divorcing and no longer have a home...i will be renting...anyone in here swing it renting with guns?...tough one!....im debating whether to bring my gun safe or just leave it to her...hmmm....guns and renting.....tough one! so many thieve landlords out there...they see a gun safe and the crooks come out!

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If you don't have kids, then you actually don't need an actual gun safe.  It depends on the area where you're renting and who the landlord is.  You may be able to secure a small safe/cabinet in a closet with bolts into the studs, but you'll have to likely repair it before leaving.

 

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26 minutes ago, 82flh said:

...haaa 53 and no kids!...yeah!...somehow i did it! hard to conceal 3 ar15's 5k rounds, and 4 handguns...lol

Not that difficult if you put your mind to it......With 3 ar15's 5k rounds, and 4 handguns you are just starting in this hobby!:lol:

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Food for thought from someone with similar living arrangements:

Change the lockset on one of your closets from an interior non-locking one to a keyed entry lock. Voila, your locking gun cabinet.

Self-install a SimpliSafe wireless alarm system in your apartment. Monitored by SimpliSafe who will communicate directly with your local police dispatch in the event of a break-in.  Your landlord (and G-d knows who else) already has a key to your new apartment.

The SimpiSafe system has a camera that will record (to the cloud) all entry activity. They also have a 'silent alarm' entry sensor that will be triggered when your gun closet is opened unless you specifically bypass it.

Very reasonably priced. The system communicates with them via wifi and has a cellular backup.

It's the best $36 a month I spend for peace of mind. And there are discount codes available in their ads on most conservative radio and tv stations. I can also do a referral to you. PM me if you want.

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Make sure you have only compliant stuff if you bring em here.  It would suck if PD ends up responding to an alarm and finds a bunch of stuff.  Or your divorcee decides she wants to screw you over and makes a false claim of abuse and mentions firearms.  Even if you did nothing wrong, it could become problematic.

So.. 10 rd or fewer mags... no flash hiders....compensators pinned.... adjustable stocks pinned... etc etc..   I suspect you already know this stuff, but wanted to mention it.

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27 minutes ago, 82flh said:

opinions on limiting mags?...might just be cheaper to buy 10 rounders? sucks...i have brand new heavy steel mags still in plastic!!!!!!!!...obviouly im still in TN...lol

You might sell your normal capacity magazines before you come north and buy 10 rd mags.

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On 10/15/2021 at 10:45 PM, Kevin125 said:

Make sure you have only compliant stuff if you bring em here.  It would suck if PD ends up responding to an alarm and finds a bunch of stuff.  Or your divorcee decides she wants to screw you over and makes a false claim of abuse and mentions firearms.  Even if you did nothing wrong, it could become problematic.

So.. 10 rd or fewer mags... no flash hiders....compensators pinned.... adjustable stocks pinned... etc etc..   I suspect you already know this stuff, but wanted to mention it.

Don’t forget to grind off those evil bayonet lugs. There is a HUGE problem with drive by bayonettings in this state. 

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1 hour ago, Displaced Texan said:

Don’t forget to grind off those evil bayonet lugs. There is a HUGE problem with drive by bayonettings in this state. 

Indeed.  Bayonet lugs can not be controlled.  Extremely dangerous to the general public.

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On 10/15/2021 at 10:22 PM, njJoniGuy said:

Self-install a SimpliSafe wireless alarm system in your apartment. Monitored by SimpliSafe who will communicate directly with your local police dispatch in the event of a break-in.  Your landlord (and G-d knows who else) already has a key to your new apartment.

The SimpiSafe system has a camera that will record (to the cloud) all entry activity. They also have a 'silent alarm' entry sensor that will be triggered when your gun closet is opened unless you specifically bypass it.

Very reasonably priced. The system communicates with them via wifi and has a cellular backup.

It's the best $36 a month I spend for peace of mind. And there are discount codes available in their ads on most conservative radio and tv stations. I can also do a referral to you. PM me if you want.

https://simplisafe.com/amac19?utm_medium=partnerdigital&utm_source=AMAC&utm_campaign=Nov4Ded

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Did it for many years. 

My main advice is rent in a big complex. The leases are drawn up by paranoid lawyers, and they know that in other places lease stipulations that forbid guns increases the responsibility of the landlord to provide for security. 

The lease didn't forbid guns, but it thought it was cute forbidding explosives. Ammo is an orm-d consumer product, not an explosive. Either they were not as clever as they thought, or it was deliberately misleading to make the client happy or to give them something to threaten problem tenants with. 

Additionally, they had a means to manage tenants refusing them entry without notice which they followed properly all but one time (they handed the keys to a town/state inspector and he through he would let himself in unannounced. I was home and he found himself going ass over teakettle down the steps when the door was made to remain close with authority). 

But I had an interior closet that I put a safe in and put a locking doorknob on. 

As others have stated, there are a lot more security options you can add on top of that. 

 

 

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