Jump to content
Cheflife15

Lever guns

Recommended Posts

31 minutes ago, RUTGERS95 said:

I thought I read somewhere someone is making one in 5.56. 

Henry makes the Long Ranger in 223/556, .243 Win, .308 Win, and 6.5 Creedmore. They are similar to the Browning BLR. They use box magazines due to the pointed bullets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, JC_68Westy said:

Henry makes the Long Ranger in 223/556, .243 Win, .308 Win, and 6.5 Creedmore. They are similar to the Browning BLR. They use box magazines due to the pointed bullets.

I prefer the older steel-receiver BLR's (original Belgium & BLR-81) over the new aluminum receiver BLR. The Long Ranger is nice, but it's not a BLR. 

If you want real old school pick the discontinued Savage 99. All steel construction, chambered in more cartridges than other lever guns, with an internal rotary magazine, and able to handle high pressure bottleneck cartridges in a striker-fired design developed more than a century ago. They came in many configurations from carbine to rifle. They are fast becoming collector items and command high prices. 

But I'm getting off the main topic here. I think the OP was inquiring about a cowboy lever action in .357. There are plenty of lever-actions out there that will always be popular.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Parker said:

I prefer the older steel-receiver BLR's (original Belgium & BLR-81) over the new aluminum receiver BLR. The Long Ranger is nice, but it's not a BLR. 

If you want real old school pick the discontinued Savage 99. All steel construction, chambered in more cartridges than other lever guns, with an internal rotary magazine, and able to handle high pressure bottleneck cartridges in a striker-fired design developed more than a century ago. They came in many configurations from carbine to rifle. They are fast becoming collector items and command high prices. 

But I'm getting off the main topic here. I think the OP was inquiring about a cowboy lever action in .357. There are plenty of lever-actions out there that will always be popular.   

I love reading about other suggestions. Unfortunately money is a bit tight (as I switched careers and am recovering from spinal surgery) so around 900 is my limit. It's just gunna be a fun pinker, I don't have the funds to really collect any guns.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/11/2021 at 2:56 PM, Cheflife15 said:

I love reading about other suggestions. Unfortunately money is a bit tight (as I switched careers and am recovering from spinal surgery) so around 900 is my limit. It's just gunna be a fun pinker, I don't have the funds to really collect any guns.

Not to worry. Plenty of lever's out there and plenty of time. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/11/2021 at 11:18 AM, Parker said:

I prefer the older steel-receiver BLR's (original Belgium & BLR-81) over the new aluminum receiver BLR. The Long Ranger is nice, but it's not a BLR. 

If you want real old school pick the discontinued Savage 99. All steel construction, chambered in more cartridges than other lever guns, with an internal rotary magazine, and able to handle high pressure bottleneck cartridges in a striker-fired design developed more than a century ago. They came in many configurations from carbine to rifle. They are fast becoming collector items and command high prices. 

But I'm getting off the main topic here. I think the OP was inquiring about a cowboy lever action in .357. There are plenty of lever-actions out there that will always be popular.   

I had a BLR in .308 that I sold for two reasons:  1. it didn't fit me well and 2. it was the least accurate .308 that I have ever owned. It was a beautiful rifle, just not for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't know how soon you want to pick one up but Ruger purchased Marlin.  

The first Ruger produced Marlins are due to hit the shelves next month I believe.  They will be chambered in 45-70 and 30/30 initially.

They say they will be making a .357 chambering.

"After the 1895SBL rolls out, Killoy said the next gun to return to the Marlin catalog will likely be the Model 336, a people's champ in .30-30, and, later, the Model 1894 in .357 and .44 Magnum. Also fleshing out the Model 1895 will be rifles chambered in .444 Marlin."

I have an older (late 70s produced) Marlin 336 chambered in 30/30 and really enjoy it.  I'm NOT enjoying the scarcity of 30/30 ammo or the price IF you can find.  Hopefully return to normal prices some time soon.

https://www.guns.com/news/2021/10/22/ruger-shows-off-its-1st-marlin-rifle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, gleninjersey said:

After the 1895SBL rolls out, Killoy said the next gun to return to the Marlin catalog will likely be the Model 336, a people's champ in .30-30, and, later, the Model 1894 in .357 and .44 Magnum. Also fleshing out the Model 1895 will be rifles chambered in .444 Marlin."

It is disappointing that the 39A is missing from that list.  They just can't make them at a price most are willing to pay. 

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/13/2021 at 11:41 AM, JC_68Westy said:

I had a BLR in .308 that I sold for two reasons:  1. it didn't fit me well and 2. it was the least accurate .308 that I have ever owned. It was a beautiful rifle, just not for me.

I had heard the same about BLR's stringing their shots as the barrel heated up, erratic groups, etc. But when I found one years ago in the cartridge I had on my bucket list, I picked one up in used but excellent condition and took a chance. I've been surprised by the groups I've gotten with the right bullets in handloads. It seems to digest well anything above 115 gr's. using 4895, 4064, 4350 & 4831 powders.  

 

It's also pleasing to look at. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/9/2021 at 6:44 PM, Cheflife15 said:

Any insight or reviews of rossis?

We (in my name, but my wife uses it more than I do) have a 9 or 10 yo stainless Rossi in .357 magnum, and have been quite happy with it. The action and ejection is pretty smooth, which was the one common criticism I saw of some of these before we purchased. Having said that, our requirements for it aren't very demanding. We wanted a short carbine in the same caliber as our three revolvers, mostly for casual shooting. I think we only paid 300-ish for it at the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/9/2021 at 6:48 PM, Scorpio64 said:

Rossi is a crap shoot.  Some are absolutely fantastic, while others are garbage.  Most of the people I know that own a Rossi are satisfied, but few are tickled pink over them.

I don't know if I'd describe me or my wife as "tickled pink" over our example, but I'm comfortable with "very well satisfied"...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/9/2021 at 6:44 PM, Cheflife15 said:

Any insight or reviews of rossis?

I have 2 Rossis.

My only issue with the 357 is the magazine spring.  I think they use the same spring on all barrel lengths (16, 20, 24?).  Mines a 16".  Looked on a Rossi forum and someone said clip X number of coils off.  Did that. Runs great feeds all 357s and 38s except wadcutters.

The Stainless Rio Grande in 30-30 has been trobule free.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, GRIZ said:

I have 2 Rossis.

My only issue with the 357 is the magazine spring.  I think they use the same spring on all barrel lengths (16, 20, 24?).  Mines a 16".  Looked on a Rossi forum and someone said clip X number of coils off.  Did that. Runs great feeds all 357s and 38s except wadcutters.

The Stainless Rio Grande in 30-30 has been trobule free.

 

Have you run any Hornady soft points through it? I keep Critical Defense for home defense using the revolvers, but I also bought some LEVERevolution for the Rossi on theory that they might feed better. If there is no feed advantage, I'd just as soon only keep the Critical Defense on hand. I'm a fan of minimizing varieties of ammo needed, that's why I acquired the Rossi to begin with. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, samiam said:

Have you run any Hornady soft points through it? I keep Critical Defense for home defense using the revolvers, but I also bought some LEVERevolution for the Rossi on theory that they might feed better. If there is no feed advantage, I'd just as soon only keep the Critical Defense on hand. I'm a fan of minimizing varieties of ammo needed, that's why I acquired the Rossi to begin with. 

Never used Leverevolution in either rifle.  Feeds fine with soft points or hollowpoints.  Leverevolution is for longer ranges IMO.

Whilst both calibers can be effective at longer ranges I consider both the 30-30 and 357 100 yd rifles with the factory sights.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, GRIZ said:

Never used Leverevolution in either rifle.  Feeds fine with soft points or hollowpoints.  Leverevolution is for longer ranges IMO.

Whilst both calibers can be effective at longer ranges I consider both the 30-30 and 357 100 yd rifles with the factory sights.

The .30-30 lever action as it comes from the factory (I.E. Henry, Winchester, Marlin) suffers from two maladies: open iron sights and a heavy, sometimes long trigger pull. In the hands of a novice shooter, this is a 100-yard gun. 

Outfit the rifle with a scope or modern peep sight, and you can extend the range. Tune the factory trigger from 9 lbs to 4 lbs. and it becomes a better shooter. Factory .30-30 150 gr. ammo carries an energy rating in excess of 1,000 ft. - lbs. out to 150 yds. Modern 160 gr. Hornady FTX ammo has a factory energy rating of 1,300 ft.- lbs. at 200 yds. In the hands of a seasoned shooter, that's plenty of oomph for deer sized game. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Parker said:

The .30-30 lever action as it comes from the factory (I.E. Henry, Winchester, Marlin) suffers from two maladies: open iron sights and a heavy, sometimes long trigger pull. In the hands of a novice shooter, this is a 100-yard gun. 

Outfit the rifle with a scope or modern peep sight, and you can extend the range. Tune the factory trigger from 9 lbs to 4 lbs. and it becomes a better shooter. Factory .30-30 150 gr. ammo carries an energy rating in excess of 1,000 ft. - lbs. out to 150 yds. Modern 160 gr. Hornady FTX ammo has a factory energy rating of 1,300 ft.- lbs. at 200 yds. In the hands of a seasoned shooter, that's plenty of oomph for deer sized game. 

The Hornady 160gr FTX is the round I use in my lever, I need to check my trigger pull on my Henry, I never felt it to be a 9lb trigger.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Parker said:

The .30-30 lever action as it comes from the factory (I.E. Henry, Winchester, Marlin) suffers from two maladies: open iron sights and a heavy, sometimes long trigger pull. In the hands of a novice shooter, this is a 100-yard gun. 

Outfit the rifle with a scope or modern peep sight, and you can extend the range. Tune the factory trigger from 9 lbs to 4 lbs. and it becomes a better shooter. Factory .30-30 150 gr. ammo carries an energy rating in excess of 1,000 ft. - lbs. out to 150 yds. Modern 160 gr. Hornady FTX ammo has a factory energy rating of 1,300 ft.- lbs. at 200 yds. In the hands of a seasoned shooter, that's plenty of oomph for deer sized game. 

Well...I'm not a novice shooter but I still consider it a 100 yd gun although the round is effective at longer ranges.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Redeye65 said:

The Hornady 160gr FTX is the round I use in my lever, I need to check my trigger pull on my Henry, I never felt it to be a 9lb trigger.

I may have exaggerated with 9 lbs. But some triggers since lawyers got involved feel like you're pulling a mule up a ladder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would recommend a Rossi.  I have it in .357 magnum with a 16 inch barrel.  I am accurate to 150 meters with the factory sights.

With all the craziness going on in late 2020, I realized I didn't have a rifle or carbine.  I would have preferred an AR platform but refused to spend good money for a NJ neutered rifle.  Shooters had the .357 magnum Rossi in stock and I paid $570 "out the door".

.357 ammo wasn't a problem, I bought it when it was $12 for a box of 50 rounds.:D

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, dilbert1967 said:

I would recommend a Rossi.  I have it in .357 magnum with a 16 inch barrel.  I am accurate to 150 meters with the factory sights.

With all the craziness going on in late 2020, I realized I didn't have a rifle or carbine.  I would have preferred an AR platform but refused to spend good money for a NJ neutered rifle.  Shooters had the .357 magnum Rossi in stock and I paid $570 "out the door".

.357 ammo wasn't a problem, I bought it when it was $12 for a box of 50 rounds.:D

My Rossi 357 zips out 158 gr ammo at about 1800 fps, chronographed. Can contend with most critters in North America.

If I was using it for SD I'd use Federal 147 gr +P+.  1200 fos chronographed.

That Federal load is 38 spl

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/17/2022 at 8:05 PM, dilbert1967 said:

I would recommend a Rossi.  I have it in .357 magnum with a 16 inch barrel.  I am accurate to 150 meters with the factory sights.

With all the craziness going on in late 2020, I realized I didn't have a rifle or carbine.  I would have preferred an AR platform but refused to spend good money for a NJ neutered rifle.  Shooters had the .357 magnum Rossi in stock and I paid $570 "out the door".

.357 ammo wasn't a problem, I bought it when it was $12 for a box of 50 rounds.:D

Bought my first lever action in the early 80's. Have added to my collection over the years. Have stepped up things in the last ten years as lever actions have escalated in price and popularity and searching for other makes that are out of production and have become scarce. 

Mine vary in age from 1939 to 1984. Only one was purchased new. 

 

Lever actions.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Parker said:

Bought my first lever action in the early 80's. Have added to my collection over the years. Have stepped up things in the last ten years as lever actions have escalated in price and popularity and searching for other makes that are out of production and have become scarce. 

Mine vary in age from 1939 to 1984. Only one was purchased new. 

 

Lever actions.jpg

Nice collection

 

  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • I wonder what my 1927 mod94 30-30 is worth now. it was my grandfathers, he shot a boat load of deer with it. has a scope on it. The scope mount is on the side, open sites with slide adjustable rear sight. Would never sell it.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...