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Mrs. Peel

TEST MY PREP!

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On 12/27/2021 at 8:44 PM, gleninjersey said:

And not to scare you, but as a single person you (or any individual person) trying to ride the storm out during a real SHTF event are at a disadvantage.  You will become a target.  You will need others to keep watch and be up when you are sleeping and they will need you to be up when they are sleeping.  During such an event it's always better to have someone watching your back and you watching their's. 

 

Since you are alone do you have an alarm system that doesn't need constant power?  Many have a battery backup to power it, but that only lasts so long, since they have to power the whole system.  

I have a Hubitat Smart Home hub which does not require internet to work.  Most of the sensors are battery operated and last several months to a year on a cheap coin battery and are just stick on so easy to install.  The hub itself would need to be powered, but only uses up to 2W so could put that on a UPS that is charged by your genny once a day.  

 

Has anyone considered getting those "free" solar installs?  If you could add battery backup to those it would be worth it.   

 

For water heating, I've seen people use black PVC pipes on the roofs to heat their pools.  I would think this could also be useful in an emergency.    

Cheap-Pool-Water-Heater.jpg?x74756

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2 hours ago, ESB said:

  

 

Since you are alone do you have an alarm system that doesn't need constant power?  Many have a battery backup to power it, but that only lasts so long, since they have to power the whole system.  

I have a Hubitat Smart Home hub which does not require internet to work.  Most of the sensors are battery operated and last several months to a year on a cheap coin battery and are just stick on so easy to install.  The hub itself would need to be powered, but only uses up to 2W so could put that on a UPS that is charged by your genny once a day.  

 

Has anyone considered getting those "free" solar installs?  If you could add battery backup to those it would be worth it.   

 

For water heating, I've seen people use black PVC pipes on the roofs to heat their pools.  I would think this could also be useful in an emergency.    

Cheap-Pool-Water-Heater.jpg?x74756

never saw this to heat pools but have seen something like this in the islands for hot water.  pvc pipe?

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4 hours ago, ESB said:

Since you are alone do you have an alarm system that doesn't need constant power?  Many have a battery backup to power it, but that only lasts so long, since they have to power the whole system.  

I have a Hubitat Smart Home hub which does not require internet to work.

Yep, all those Ring systems are useless when the WiFi goes down.

4 hours ago, ESB said:

Has anyone considered getting those "free" solar installs?  If you could add battery backup to those it would be worth it.   

Many of those "free" systems won't let you tap into them or do a battery backup system, since your excess power is suppose to go back into the grid. When the grid goes down, those systems are useless too, as the Inverters get shut off.

I had a neighbor next to me with a roof full of solar during Hurricane Sandy. When the grid went down, his house was as dark as everyone elses. He had to go out and scrounge around for a generator, even though he had the potential to power his whole house with his panels.

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6 hours ago, ESB said:

Since you are alone do you have an alarm system that doesn't need constant power?

Well, I believe I did mention my elderly, 7-pound, half-blind, half-deaf dog... she's still got a few teeth left! ;)

Seriously though, something to consider. Thx for your suggestion!

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10 minutes ago, ESB said:

I kinda figured those free ones don't want you using battery backup, but what's to keep you from doing it anyway?  Are they actually inspecting every system on a regular basis?  ;)

They know your output each month, and when it drops, they'll pay you a visit. It's part of the lease agreement. They make their money on selling the SRECs.. they won't give up that gravy train.

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22 hours ago, Sniper said:

They know your output each month, and when it drops, they'll pay you a visit. It's part of the lease agreement. They make their money on selling the SRECs.. they won't give up that gravy train.

But they wouldn't know during a power outage, right? What's to stop you from having system in place and ready to go in such a situation?

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1 hour ago, leahcim said:

But they wouldn't know during a power outage, right? What's to stop you from having system in place and ready to go in such a situation?

That's possible, but you would also need to keep the batteries charged when the grid is up, so the amount being siphoned off to do that would be noticed.

You would also need to do noticeable changes to the inverter, wiring and switch gear to be ready. Sure, it can be done, but who will risk getting caught by the solar company if they ever came out to check/repair the system?

A battery backup system to solar should be part of the complete system, so power you produce/save during the day can be used by you at night when the sun goes down. Unfortunately, very few people but that additional thought/construction into planning of their system...

They just wanted the "free" panels...

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I doubt the difference in keeping the batteries topped off would be noticeable if you don't actually use the batteries.  Just enough to offset the inherent loss during storage.  I'd imagine really dirty solar panels would effect output more. 

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On 1/7/2022 at 10:29 AM, ESB said:

don't want you using battery backup,

They object to whole house back up systems, but there is noting they can do about UPSs.  Instead of one large single point battery bank, get several UPSs and hook up to critical things like lights, computers, network gear.  It's not a perfect solution, but it covers some important basics and requires no action if the lights go out.

Even if one did install a large battery bank, it's not like they draw a lot of current.  Once they are fully charged, they don't use much current at all.  The initial charge could easily be hidden by using a low Amperage charger, a one or two amp charger would do the trick.  If it's only used during outages, I don't see how there could be any complaints.

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Been meaning to chime into this thread.

For starters, a few quick thoughts after reading thru the posts so far.

1) You mentioned liking the fact your generator has electric start.  However, unless you test run your genny relatively frequently, monthly perhaps(?) your battery may be discharged when you need to rely on it.  In which case you would need to rely on the pull start anyway.

2) Check the owners manual for your genny's  maintenance schedule (e.g. oil changes, spark plug replacement, etc.). Stay on top of maintenance to maintain your confidence that it will be dependable when you really really need it to be.  

3) Do you have a holster, and a quality gun belt,  for whatever handgun you would carry on your person within your home when things get dicey.  This would be in addition to whatever firearms you may have staged in your home.

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32 minutes ago, oldguysrule649 said:

Been meaning to chime into this thread.

For starters, a few quick thoughts after reading thru the posts so far.

1) You mentioned liking the fact your generator has electric start.  However, unless you test run your genny relatively frequently, monthly perhaps(?) your battery may be discharged when you need to rely on it.  In which case you would need to rely on the pull start anyway.

2) Check the owners manual for your genny's  maintenance schedule (e.g. oil changes, spark plug replacement, etc.). Stay on top of maintenance to maintain your confidence that it will be dependable when you really really need it to be.  

3) Do you have a holster, and a quality gun belt,  for whatever handgun you would carry on your person within your home when things get dicey.  This would be in addition to whatever firearms you may have staged in your home.

Good input on 1) and 2) - already planning to do both! I figure I'll test it monthly during the winter (the cold weather is my biggest worry anyway & also, I would guess, that's when batteries are most vulnerable?) - and then every other month during warmer seasons. I'm guessing that should be sufficient? And I will, of course, follow the maintenance schedule - do that first oil change when needed, etc. It makes zero sense to plunk down a couple grand on an item and then not do the proper PM routine. You made me realize though - I need to buy a few bottles of the right oil to have it on-hand. 

And, you also nailed it with the holster/belt... that's something I just started investigating recently... and it's one of the very last items to be checked off of my initial "prep list".. along with practicing drawing from a holster (I do have the fake replica already to practice with - just need to decide on holster type). If something really catastrophic happened (perish the thought!) and things got really "dicey" with people trying to steal generators, steal fuel, etc., well, goodness... I can see how a person might want to be carrying just walking out into his/her own yard to re-start a generator or something, I mean especially if you have to go out at night. Well, let's hope that never comes to pass... and that the worst we face is a much less alarming event!

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45 minutes ago, oldguysrule649 said:

Do you have a holster, and a quality gun belt,  for whatever handgun you would carry on your person within your home when things get dicey. 

and a extra mag pouch.

13 minutes ago, Mrs. Peel said:

If something really catastrophic happened (perish the thought!) and things got really "dicey" with people trying to steal generators, steal fuel, etc., well, goodness... I can see how a person might want to be carrying just walking out into his/her own yard to re-start a generator or something, I mean especially if you have to go out at night.

Keep in mind, a generator running during a power outage attracts a LOT of attention, when it's dead quiet in the neighborhood. Not to mention a house lit up, when all the others are dark...

48 minutes ago, oldguysrule649 said:

You mentioned liking the fact your generator has electric start.  However, unless you test run your genny relatively frequently, monthly perhaps(?) your battery may be discharged when you need to rely on it. 

I wish I had a nickel for every time a person told me they went to start their battery start generator or snow blower, but the battery was dead. Most forget to keep that battery charged. Which is why I go with the KISS system...

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On 1/8/2022 at 9:19 AM, leahcim said:

But they wouldn't know during a power outage, right? What's to stop you from having system in place and ready to go in such a situation?

I have solar panels on my house.  I also used some of my GI Bill money and took some courses on Sustainable Energy, Energy Auditing and HVAC/R.  I bought my system outright so I get the SRECs from the power produced instead of a company like Solar City renting my roof and them getting the SRECs.  The way the inverters work is like this (in a nut shell): 

As long as the inverter sees there is stable grid power (something like 240v + or - 5% at 60 hertz for 5 continue minutes), it will convert DC power to AC power.  The AC power goes to your house and/or what ever you don't use goes to the transformer on the pole near your house that supplies your house.  From there it gets stepped up to match the power on the lines and send down the street to another house on the grid that is drawing power.  

During a power outage, the inverter must disconnect from the grid to avoid the possibility of sending power down the lines while utility workers are conducting maintenance or repair actions.  Since the inverter only changes DC to AC and can't moderate the flow of this power, it either has to send it all somewhere or it has to send all of it nowhere.  Thus, if you loose grid power, the inverter will shut down completely (unless you have battery backup system, more on that below). 

To install a solar system connected to the grid like this requires approved permits from the electric utility company and they only approve systems with inverters that perform this disconnect when grid power goes down.  They used to come out and test the disconnect feature on every inverter installed on a house before they allowed the final installation to take place, but now, so many people have solar, they only test a random number of inverters and give test waivers for the rest as long as the inverter model meets code and the installer has done enough installs in the past that passed inspection.  

Anyway, to maintain use of your solar power when the grid goes down requires a battery system and a power inverter that can isolate the grid connection and reroute inverted power to the battery system, giving your house power "on an island."  This is an internal function to the inverter and is a feature that most inverters do not have because it significantly increases the cost of the inverter.  Since most people with solar systems don't choose to install batteries, inverter manufacturers don't build it in as a standard option.  But it is an available on some models.  You can install a grid tied system, then later have the inverter changed and add a battery system, but it's not something the average non-electrician home owner can safely do since you're working with the main power coming into the house from the transformer and you have up to 600v of DC power coming off the solar panels.  Also, if you change inverters, your electrician will have to redo the permitting process with the local electric company.  Unless you go completely off grid.       

Most people don't opt to include a battery backup because there is a very significant cost to including a battery system.  Besides the inverter being more expensive, batteries, battery charge controllers and the other equipment for the batteries is very expensive.  This additional equipment increases installation labor costs.  Most people don't go this route unless they are completely off grid.  Most grid connected users like having solar energy which gives them little to no electric bill (I pay between $5 and $7 a month), and the stability of the grid at night or during cloudy days.  Most people haven't gone a step further and began to prepare for a long term or even permanent involuntary plunge into living off grid like a major SHTF situation could produce.  In the grand scheme of things, in the US, the power is really stable and rarely goes out, especially compared to some 3rd world countries.  For that reason most people have little reason to believe that will change, let alone begin to spend money to hedge against it. 

While the batteries can store a lot of power, it wasn't until recently that the battery technology advanced and there are models available that can discharge a decent amount continuous peak power.  Even now, they don't put out the amount of power you get from a backup generator.  That's another drawback of the battery system.  For all the money spent to install it, you have a limited amount of instant available power when the grid goes down.  When you compare cost of installation dollars per peak kilowatt hour of available power, a backup generator is almost always economically cheaper to install.  For "prepper" purposes, considering the context of this thread, I will acknowledge the generators 2 biggest downsides:  It needs fuel and it makes a lot of noise which can attract unwanted attention to the fact that you have power when others don't. 

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Hoping you can get some ideas from the following. Of course tailoring it based on your own needs, budget, and planning scenarios.

My full list of preps are documented in a detailed spreadsheet whose columns include: Prep Category, Item Name, Description, 
Purchase Date, Expiration Date, Vendor, Manufacturer, Storage Location (e.g. Carton #), and Quantity on Hand. There are currently approx 260 line items in the spreadsheet.  All preps are stored in numbered cartons/bins located in my home and at a separate storage unit.  These are all dedicated supplies for use in an emergency.  Items with expiration dates (canned foods, batteries, medicines, etc.) are rotated as best as I can with our day to day supplies. 

I initially developed my ideas of what preps I want to acquire by:
1) My own brain dump while sitting in my cold dark house in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, with a yellow pad, pen, and flashlight; committing to paper all the things I wish I had had.
2) I subsequently read the book "The Disaster Preparedness Handbook-A Guide For Families" by Arthur T. Bradley, cover to cover, with my yellow pad and pen at hand.

I routinely follow several preparedness channels on Youtube (City Prepping, Alaska Prepper, Magic Prepper) as well as r/preppers on Reddit, with the goal of continuous learning and identifying any gaps in my preparedness.


Prep Categories, with some representative examples of each, include:

1) Communications: Police scanner, Shortwave/Weather/AM/FM radio(s), FRS/GMRS Handheld transceivers, TV antenna and (if required) digital converter box to receive over the air TV.
2) Cooking: Barbecue grill(propane), Coleman Stove(propane canisters), Burton Mr Max Tabletop Stove(butane canisters).
3) Documentation: Manuals for your generator, emergency radios, medical/first aid, etc.
4) Cordage: Clothesline, Paracord, Bungee cords, etc.
5) Electrical: Dual/Tri fuel Generator, Extension cords (e.g. quality ones such as Prime Bulldog Tough), outlet boxes, UPS units for computer/other electronics, power strips/surge protectors, batteries(triple set for every radio, flashlight, smoke and CO detector, etc in my home).
6) Food: well stocked pantry, Canned goods, manual can openers, Longterm Storage Emergency food buckets
7) Fuel: Propane, Gasoline, Matches, Waterproof matches, Cooking sternos, barbecue lighters, fuel transfer hand pump, etc.
8) Hygiene: Body cleansing wipes, Toilet bucket, toilet seat for bucket, Toilet Waste Bags and deodorizer.
9) Lighting: Coleman lanterns, Flashlights, Head mounted flashlights, etc.
10) Medical:  First aid items such as bandaids, ace bandages, neosporine, Bleedstop, anti-diarrheals, cold medicines, pain relievers, vitamins, peroxide, rubbing alcohol, etc.
11) Misc: Sealants (e.g. JB Weld, Shoe Goo shoe repair, cauking,etc.) Duct tape, contractor garbage bags, large tarps.
12) Nuclear: (yes I said nuclear, lol)  IOSTAT radiation tablets from ANBEX.com, Geiger counter (check Amazon)
13) Safety: Rainproof coveralls, N95 masks, eye safety goggles, heavy duty work gloves, nitrile surgical gloves.
14) Security: All things firearms related, locks, security cables, OC/Mace sprays, whistle.
15) Water: water filters of various types, Water Bob(for tub), water treatment chemicals, fine mesh paint filters(for pre-filtering water), water storage boxes with mylar bags, water siphon, etc.

I have not yet researched portable solar panels and solar "generators".  That is on my todo list.  I do have a Honda EU3000 generator and my house is equipped with a transfer switch(6 circuits).

Feel free to ask for any clarification or details related to any of the above.

p.s. I do not have a dog. However my home does have a central station fire and burglar alarm system as well as various security cameras.

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Holy Kamoley!! These last 2 posts have me rocked. Here I was feeling puffed up for the amount of stuff I have done in the last year... I'm a total LOSER compared to some of you folks! Seriously, apparently I need to go back to the drawing board. :rofl:

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8 minutes ago, Mrs. Peel said:

I'm a total LOSER compared to some of you folks! Seriously, apparently I need to go back to the drawing board. 

Being prepared isn't a single point on a map. It's a journey and a destination.

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18 hours ago, Mrs. Peel said:

Holy Kamoley!! These last 2 posts have me rocked. Here I was feeling puffed up for the amount of stuff I have done in the last year... I'm a total LOSER compared to some of you folks! Seriously, apparently I need to go back to the drawing board. :rofl:

Peel,

Actually you are doing quite well and off to a great start based on what you have shared so far.    As Sniper stated, it is a journey.  Slow and steady wins the race.  Thing about about the various emergency scenarios that may affect you, decide what your goals and priorities are, compile a list of the things you need to do/purchase, and then execute on that plan over time.   It is developing and maintaining a preparedness mindset that is most important.  That will enable to you also recognize emerging risks and act to prepare and mitigate those risks before the general public panics.  Moreover, being prepared for what may come is comforting and gives you some semblance of control when unexpected events occur.   

An example of that mindset was when word of covid first started to rear its head in early 2020, it was a call to action to me to recheck my preps inventory, identify any gaps given the emerging risk(s),  and address those needs.    At the time, I was as concerned if not more so, about the public's reaction to the news reports, than I was to the virus itself.  I vividly remember going to Costco one evening in late Feb/early March 2020 and spending close to $500.  After checking out I sat down at one of the food tables and sent a text to my adult children stating in a very serious tone that if they had not yet given thought to emergency preparedness, now was the time to do so.  That was a full 2-3 weeks before shortages started to appear.

With all that said,  I am in much better shape preparedness-wise than I used to be.   However not perfect by any means.   And lastly, there is one major weak link in all of this that concerns me.  That weak link is me.  I turn 69 in a few months.  While in decent health and wanting to live for another 40 years,  the clock of life is ticking.  

Thanks for reading and hopefully has provided some food for thought.

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Thanks, @oldguysrule649. I'm way behind you and others, but that said, I do realize I'm also way ahead of where I was a year ago. So, yeah... that's something!  

I'm really glad I opened this thread though... because it (along with a couple others like the one on "how much cash" to keep on hand) have definitely identified "gaps" in my initial planning (despite, like you, having watched a number of YouTube videos - even some of the same channels, lol). So, I've adjusted my list accordingly (it's not a big detailed spreadsheet like yours, mind you, just a simple Word table listing general category, # of items of each to keep in stock, etc. - I know the few locations where I keep things, so I don't have to list locations or anything like that, and I also replenish new stuff at the back so I'm also pulling older first). I just don't have much tolerance for a planning document that can't be maintained on 1-2 pages - just a personal preference! I hate spreadsheets.) Besides, even though I'm responsible for a whole house - since there's only me and one tiny dog, the quantities and the complexities (of storage, etc.) are certainly a little less in my case that in others' situations - so I can work with something more streamlined.

It's interesting to me though how each person has had their "aha!" moments that turned them towards prepping. It sounds like for you it was Sandy. For me, it was the one-two punch of reading Ted Koppel's book about the grid going down but also coupled with Sandy. By Day 5 or so post-Sandy, I was passing by gas stations and seeing COPS stationed there - because of reported fistfights breaking out. Sobering to say the least! Goes to show you how quickly people will revert to aggressive behavior. And that storm was NOTHING compared to how bad things would get across a multi-month shutdown of power, for instance. I may not have a "gritty" type job - like first responders do - that exposes me to the ugliest of human nature, but as an informal student of human nature, I'm not a fool either! I have no delusions about what people are capable of, particularly when feeling desperate. Just seeing that little glimpse post-Sandy - the beginnings of frayed nerves, people acting out, getting aggressive, etc. - well, that drove it home! I mean, that was just a stupid storm... multiply that behavior 1000x if something REALLY bad ever happened. It gave me just the kick in the butt I needed. COVID has only driven that home even more - people have lost it.

I quickly realized that as a single woman, I needed to put myself in a position where as much (and for as long) as possible (within reason, of course), I can stay out of any chaos - that I won't have to go out and put myself smack into the middle of a bad situation - where people are pushing, shoving and muscling their way to the last items on the grocery store shelf. I'm a realist... that's a fight I will not win. Best to avoid those situations entirely. Speaking of which, I just returned from the Shop-Rite Can-Can sale with an excellent take! Woo-hoo! The sweet, sweet, intoxicating scent of shopping/prepping victory is in the air! :D 

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1 hour ago, Mrs. Peel said:

Speaking of which, I just returned from the Shop-Rite Can-Can sale with an excellent take! Woo-hoo! The sweet, sweet, intoxicating scent of shopping/prepping victory is in the air! :D 

So you didn't buy any beans? :icon_lol:

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2 hours ago, CMJeepster said:

So you didn't buy any beans? :icon_lol:

That's one of the few things I buy in cans... and sauerkraut  and dog food....

2 hours ago, Mrs. Peel said:

Boy Humor. I'll really never understand it fully! :facepalm:

Remember, men are from Mars, women are from Venus.

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Just realized my laptop and PC do not have cameras and I needed one.  Luckily I had a USB camera for my 3D printers that I stole.  But was thinking that if you are stuck at home and want to video call friends/family or more importantly tele-doc, this would be very useful.  I know most phones have this ability, but "1 is none and 2 is one, etc".  ;)   

I tried about 5 different cameras before settling on this one.  It is 1080p and is plug and play for PC, Mac, and Linux and is only $24.

https://amzn.to/3qkGQs1

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On 1/11/2022 at 11:25 PM, oldguysrule649 said:

Hoping you can get some ideas from the following. Of course tailoring it based on your own needs, budget, and planning scenarios.

My full list of preps are documented in a detailed spreadsheet whose columns include: Prep Category, Item Name, Description, 
Purchase Date, Expiration Date, Vendor, Manufacturer, Storage Location (e.g. Carton #), and Quantity on Hand. There are currently approx 260 line items in the spreadsheet.  All preps are stored in numbered cartons/bins located in my home and at a separate storage unit.  These are all dedicated supplies for use in an emergency.  Items with expiration dates (canned foods, batteries, medicines, etc.) are rotated as best as I can with our day to day supplies. 

I initially developed my ideas of what preps I want to acquire by:
1) My own brain dump while sitting in my cold dark house in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, with a yellow pad, pen, and flashlight; committing to paper all the things I wish I had had.
2) I subsequently read the book "The Disaster Preparedness Handbook-A Guide For Families" by Arthur T. Bradley, cover to cover, with my yellow pad and pen at hand.

I routinely follow several preparedness channels on Youtube (City Prepping, Alaska Prepper, Magic Prepper) as well as r/preppers on Reddit, with the goal of continuous learning and identifying any gaps in my preparedness.


Prep Categories, with some representative examples of each, include:

1) Communications: Police scanner, Shortwave/Weather/AM/FM radio(s), FRS/GMRS Handheld transceivers, TV antenna and (if required) digital converter box to receive over the air TV.
2) Cooking: Barbecue grill(propane), Coleman Stove(propane canisters), Burton Mr Max Tabletop Stove(butane canisters).
3) Documentation: Manuals for your generator, emergency radios, medical/first aid, etc.
4) Cordage: Clothesline, Paracord, Bungee cords, etc.
5) Electrical: Dual/Tri fuel Generator, Extension cords (e.g. quality ones such as Prime Bulldog Tough), outlet boxes, UPS units for computer/other electronics, power strips/surge protectors, batteries(triple set for every radio, flashlight, smoke and CO detector, etc in my home).
6) Food: well stocked pantry, Canned goods, manual can openers, Longterm Storage Emergency food buckets
7) Fuel: Propane, Gasoline, Matches, Waterproof matches, Cooking sternos, barbecue lighters, fuel transfer hand pump, etc.
8) Hygiene: Body cleansing wipes, Toilet bucket, toilet seat for bucket, Toilet Waste Bags and deodorizer.
9) Lighting: Coleman lanterns, Flashlights, Head mounted flashlights, etc.
10) Medical:  First aid items such as bandaids, ace bandages, neosporine, Bleedstop, anti-diarrheals, cold medicines, pain relievers, vitamins, peroxide, rubbing alcohol, etc.
11) Misc: Sealants (e.g. JB Weld, Shoe Goo shoe repair, cauking,etc.) Duct tape, contractor garbage bags, large tarps.
12) Nuclear: (yes I said nuclear, lol)  IOSTAT radiation tablets from ANBEX.com, Geiger counter (check Amazon)
13) Safety: Rainproof coveralls, N95 masks, eye safety goggles, heavy duty work gloves, nitrile surgical gloves.
14) Security: All things firearms related, locks, security cables, OC/Mace sprays, whistle.
15) Water: water filters of various types, Water Bob(for tub), water treatment chemicals, fine mesh paint filters(for pre-filtering water), water storage boxes with mylar bags, water siphon, etc.

I have not yet researched portable solar panels and solar "generators".  That is on my todo list.  I do have a Honda EU3000 generator and my house is equipped with a transfer switch(6 circuits).

Feel free to ask for any clarification or details related to any of the above.

p.s. I do not have a dog. However my home does have a central station fire and burglar alarm system as well as various security cameras.

scanner-wise.....your police depts up there aren't on project 25? down here they are. no one makes a consumer product that'll pick up those transmissions.

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5 hours ago, 1LtCAP said:

scanner-wise.....your police depts up there aren't on project 25? down here they are. no one makes a consumer product that'll pick up those transmissions.

I can receive my local town, Middletown, and most of the surrounding municipalities without any problem.  The one notable exception is Hazlet which is encrypted and I assume uses the P25 protocol you referred to.  Fwiw, my scanner is a Uniden BCD396XT.  I control it via Proscan on my Windows PC.

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