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Omicron explosion spurs nationwide breakdown of services

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2 hours ago, 1LtCAP said:

i noticed that last weekend at the somerdale walmart.

It was also like experiencing The Night of the Living Dead. Even wifey noticed the Zombies walking around. Seriously wondering if all those disgusting masks they're wearing is impeding oxygen flow to their brains?

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The variants and LIES will continue till the whole USA bows to china like traitor joe the 50 year serial LIAR. 

Miracle cure by 22 elections to BS the sheeple and shore up demented bidoom?

You betcha. 

Biggest scam and theft of the US treasury EVER !!!

 

china's bitch.jpg

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18 hours ago, Sniper said:

Since early December, she said more and more employees have had to take off from work because of getting Covid or having close contact with someone who is sick. She said 15 employees are currently out of the store’s nearly 60-person staff.

Fewer pallets are arriving from Safeway’s warehouses and there are not enough grocery workers to help unload them, she said.

Because of the quarantine rules, Not because people are home sick in bed.

Another manufactured crisis.

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On 1/12/2022 at 12:37 PM, Bomber said:

Because of the quarantine rules, Not because people are home sick in bed.

Another manufactured crisis.

that's what i was gonna say. not a single problem in this country is because of covid. they are all due to the reactions and bullshiit "mandates"

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It looks like the Nationwide problems will turn into Worldwide problems, since the world is hooked on cheap crap from China.

Global Economy Heading For "Mother Of All" Supply Chain Shocks As China Locks Down Ports

With sailing schedules already facing delays of about a week, freight forwarders warn of the impact on already back-logged gateways in Europe and the US and is also why HSBC economists are warning that the world economy could be headed for the “mother of all” supply chain shocks if the highly infectious omicron variant which is already swamping much of the global economy spreads across Asia, especially China, at which point disruption to manufacturing will be inevitable.

"Temporary, one would hope, but hugely disruptive all the same" in the next few months, they wrote in a research note this week first noted by Bloomberg.

But what until recently was a minority view confined to our modest website, has since expanded and as Bloomberg writes overnight, the effects of restrictions in China as the country maintains its Covid-zero policy "are starting to hit supply chains in the region."

As a result of the slow movement of goods through some of the country’s busiest and most important ports means shippers are now diverting to Shanghai, causing the types of knock-on delays at the world’s biggest container port that led to massive congestion bottlenecks last summer that eventually translated into a record number of container ships waiting off the coast of California, a glut that hasn't been cleared to this day.

https://www.zerohedge.com/economics/global-economy-heading-mother-all-supply-chain-shocks-china-locks-down-ports

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12 hours ago, Sota said:

Got just over a case of toilet paper here.  Just put in a curbside pickup for a bunch of stuff.

maybe I should order more butt paper too.

 

3 hours ago, 1LtCAP said:

got a case at the shop, and a case at home.

You guys need to up your game:

th?id=OIP.ypZH1Ia6oOJ8Ly4aLcHxzgHaD4%26p

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Here's a good description comparing a short term disruption (like from a storm) versus what's going on now with supply shortages.

There's a difference...

Temporary Empty Shelves Are Not a Supply Chain Crisis, It Is Important to Understand the Difference

...."Unfortunately, there is a lot of wrong information being discussed and shared.  Even reputable regional media are giving inaccurate information, making wrong interpretations {LINK}, and generally getting the explanations wrong.  Additionally, there’s general misinterpretations of ordinary outages based on the day of the week (Sunday) and bad weather in the Northeast {ex Twitter Thread}.

An empty retail shelf or case for a 24, 36 to 48-hour period is not, I repeat, NOT, part of a systemic supply chain disruption.  Those are mostly location and regional specific out of stock situations caused by localized events, weather and employee shortages.

What CTH has been describing for the past several months is NOT what is noted above.  What we have been describing is a long term supply chain crisis that will slowly unfold over a period of about a week or two, and then remain a problem over time, for a period of 6+ months. {GO DEEP}

https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2022/01/09/temporary-empty-shelves-are-not-a-supply-chain-crisis-it-is-important-to-understand-the-difference/

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It's going to get worse, before it gets better. YOU'VE BEEN WARNED !!!!

When Reuters reports this (who normally protects Brandon), you know it's getting real!

U.S. grocery shortages deepen as pandemic dries supplies

(Reuters) - High demand for groceries combined with soaring freight costs and Omicron-related labor shortages are creating a new round of backlogs at processed food and fresh produce companies, leading to empty supermarket shelves at major retailers across the United States.

Growers of perishable produce across the West Coast are paying nearly triple pre-pandemic trucking rates to ship things like lettuce and berries before they spoil.

Myers said transportation disruptions in the last three weeks, caused by a lack of truck drivers and recent highway-blocking storms, have led to a doubling of freight costs for fruit and vegetable producers, on top of already-elevated pandemic prices. "We typically will ship, East Coast to West Coast – we used to do it for about $7,000," he said. "Today it’s somewhere between $18,000 and $22,000."

Birds Eye frozen vegetables maker Conagra Brands' CEO Sean Connolly told investors last week that supplies from its U.S. plants could be constrained for at least the next month due to Omicron-related absences.

Earlier this week, Albertsons CEO Vivek Sankaran said he expects the supermarket chain to confront more supply chain challenges over the next four to six weeks as Omicron has put a dent in its efforts to plug supply chain gaps.

https://news.yahoo.com/u-grocery-shortages-deepen-pandemic-180518711.html

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Well, this should really help make things better.... NOT... What crosses the Northern border by truck? I know cars are assembled up there, building materials, what else might be affected?

Vaccine Mandate for Cross Border Trucking Now in Effect, Mandate for Domestic Trucking Begins in a Week, Prepare Your Affairs Accordingly

Keep in mind, any impact is taking place in a supply chain system that is already tenuous and unstable at best.  A small disruption that may have been minimally significant against a fully operational supply chain, is more likely to be a much bigger disruption in a supply chain that is already under a severe amount of demand side stress.  Somewhere in the range of 16,000 to 38,000 daily loads are likely to be impacted.

The truth is no one knows how bad the disruption will be.  What we do know is that there will be disruption, and there is no infrastructure for a level of rig-switching at the border crossing region that could accommodate changing rigs, drop-offs and/or pick-ups or driver transfers on the scale that is being discussed.   

The logistics here are a total mess.

https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2022/01/16/vaccine-mandate-for-cross-border-trucking-now-in-effect-mandate-for-domestic-trucking-begins-in-a-week-prepare-your-affairs-accordingly/

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6 hours ago, CMJeepster said:

My best friend is in the building materials business, specifically lumber.  He's scrambling to figure out how to get his stuff from Canada into the U.S. and vice versa.

Not good... I saw this list of what we import from Canada... looks like quite a bit:

  1. Mineral fuels including oil: US$69.1 billion (17.7% of total exports)
  2. Vehicles: $46.5 billion (11.9%)
  3. Machinery including computers: $28.9 billion (7.4%)
  4. Gems, precious metals: $23 billion (5.9%)
  5. Wood: $13.5 billion (3.4%)
  6. Plastics, plastic articles: $12.4 billion (3.2%)
  7. Electrical machinery, equipment: $11 billion (2.8%)
  8. Ores, slag, ash: $9.9 billion (2.5%)
  9. Aircraft, spacecraft: $9.7 billion (2.5%)
  10. Pharmaceuticals: $8.5 billion (2.2%)
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6 minutes ago, RUTGERS95 said:

don't care, fully prepared but one thing I will say is that there should be a 'group' that has plans for any eventual downfall or breakdown

You mean like this "group"?

Virginia-Militia.jpg&f=1&nofb=1

Oh wait, that's a different type of breakdown.. :mutley:

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Hope no one is waiting on a delivery from Canada or Mexico:

US To Close Borders To Unvaccinated Canadian, Mexican Truckers On Saturday

The U.S. will close its borders to unvaccinated and partially vaccinated Canadian and Mexican truck drivers on Saturday, the Department of Homeland Security said on Thursday.

“These updated travel requirements reflect the Biden-Harris Administration’s commitment to protecting public health while safely facilitating the cross-border trade and travel that is critical to our economy,” Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas said in a statement. 

The border COVID-19 vaccine mandates are coming into force despite pushback from the truck industry. The impact will be felt most acutely for the U.S.-Canada freight market, where around 160,000 truckers regularly cross the border — 75% of whom are Canadian.

https://www.zerohedge.com/economics/us-close-borders-unvaccinated-canadian-mexican-truckers-saturday

Now, if you're an unvaxxed illegal, then they welcome you in with open arms!! So, the truck driver has to be vaxxed, not the 50 illegal Mexicans riding in the back of his truck...  :facepalm:

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Just another dot....

DC Mayor Muriel Bowser Asks Residents to Begin Voluntary Rationing of Food at Grocery Stores

DC Mayor and COVID Compliance Minister, Muriel Bowser, asks residents in/around her region to enter a phase of voluntary rationing.  What comes after the voluntary phase is the part many have been studiously preparing to avoid.

DC-FEMA-Rationing.jpg

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this is why i have been thanking my grandmom every night. when i saw empty shelves at the beginning of the panic, it made me think of her and how she'd always had shelves and shelves of food well ahead of time.  i am channeling my grandmom since last year.

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1 hour ago, 1LtCAP said:

this is why i have been thanking my grandmom every night. when i saw empty shelves at the beginning of the panic, it made me think of her and how she'd always had shelves and shelves of food well ahead of time.  i am channeling my grandmom since last year.

Yeah, I have to concur! My own Italian grandmother maintained a massive garden, canned the produce and lived on it throughout the year, kept fruit trees in the yard and used that produce too, raised chickens for meat and eggs at one point, and sewed curtains and her daughter's dresses from potato sacks. When she was widowed, she had the wisdom to to renovate her house, adding a rental unit to bring more money in. Smart, industrious, an absolute dynamo - all 4 ft 11 inches of her. (Oh, and her homemade pizza was the best ever - can't forget that!). My point is, the generations before us tended, I think, to be thrifty and resilient - the original "preppers" - and they had to be. It was sink or swim. There wasn't the big government safety net and resulting sense of entitlement that exists today. We could learn a thing or two from them.

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