Jump to content
MikeL417

Going to the Range without my COE

Recommended Posts

Hey guys quick dumb question because I have gotten mixed answers. Is there any problem with my transporting my firearm to the range WITHOUT my COE? Could there be any complications because of this? I do bring my FPID but I don't know if I'm in trouble for not bringing my COE because I may have misplaced it.

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

while people will tell you "it is good to have just in case.." there is absolutely no form of protection having your FPID card will grant you.. even if you are stopped it tells the police ONE thing and only one thing.. and that is on the day it happened to have been issued, you were not a prohibited person.. ANYTHING could have happened since then.. so really it does nothing IMO..

 

unless of course you are joy riding with long guns in the trunk.. it is good for that.. but besides that.. its only use is to purchase firearms..

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With any long arm sale there are two COE's filled out. One copy goes to the purchaser of the long gun, the second is retained by the selling FFL. I believe they usually file them with the 4473, but that's an assumption on my part.

 

Benn doing it as long as I've been in NJ which is 33 years (and no time off for good behavior).

 

Adios,

 

Pizza Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With any long arm sale there are two COE's filled out. One copy goes to the purchaser of the long gun, the second is retained by the selling FFL. I believe they usually file them with the 4473, but that's an assumption on my part.

 

Benn doing it as long as I've been in NJ which is 33 years (and no time off for good behavior).

 

Adios,

 

Pizza Bob

 

OK, so it's a form that is filled out when you buy a gun. If that's been happening for 33 years, then I've certainly filled them out.

 

It sounded like there was some confusion about whether you had to either carry one when transporting firearms or bring one with you to purchase a firearm. It was stated you only needed one to buy a gun, leaving the latter item in my speculation open (bring one with you to buy), and I was thinking it was some sort of new form you needed approved for every purchase like a pistol permit.

 

Thanks for the explanation. I certainly hope I never need to fill one out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been told that if you stumble upon a law officer that has an itch on a given day, if your firearms are disclosed to him or her, he or she can be take them until you provide such proof that they are yours. And, I believe that they can be held for an undisclosed amount of time until "proof" is satisfied. Having a COE or a copy of the pistol permit might alleviate that to some extent. I believe that large sums of money on your person can also be detained.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been told that if you stumble upon a law officer that has an itch on a given day, if your firearms are disclosed to him or her, he or she can be take them until you provide such proof that they are yours. And, I believe that they can be held for an undisclosed amount of time until "proof" is satisfied. Having a COE or a copy of the pistol permit might alleviate that to some extent. I believe that large sums of money on your person can also be detained.

 

You don't have to disclose anything. They can't search your or your vehicle unless you really give them a damn good reason for doing so. Getting caught after a high speed chase or trying to run someone over with your car comes to mind.

 

But for routine stops, you've got nothing to worry about. If you did have something to worry about, no COE or FPID is going to make one iota of difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't have to disclose anything. They can't search your or your vehicle unless you really give them a damn good reason for doing so. Getting caught after a high speed chase or trying to run someone over with your car comes to mind.

 

But for routine stops, you've got nothing to worry about. If you did have something to worry about, no COE or FPID is going to make one iota of difference.

 

Or, they can just make something up as a reason to search your car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been told that if you stumble upon a law officer that has an itch on a given day, if your firearms are disclosed to him or her, he or she can be take them until you provide such proof that they are yours. And, I believe that they can be held for an undisclosed amount of time until "proof" is satisfied. Having a COE or a copy of the pistol permit might alleviate that to some extent. I believe that large sums of money on your person can also be detained.

Why would you need to prove something in your possession belongs to you? Unless the police just got a report of someone matching your description stealing some firearms, or have some other reasonable suspicion they are stolen, I don't think they would have any cause to make you prove their yours any more than if you had tennis rackets in the car.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

while people will tell you "it is good to have just in case.." there is absolutely no form of protection having your FPID card will grant you.. even if you are stopped it tells the police ONE thing and only one thing.. and that is on the day it happened to have been issued, you were not a prohibited person.. ANYTHING could have happened since then.. so really it does nothing IMO..

 

unless of course you are joy riding with long guns in the trunk.. it is good for that.. but besides that.. its only use is to purchase firearms..

 

Yup

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why would you need to prove something in your possession belongs to you? Unless the police just got a report of someone matching your description stealing some firearms, or have some other reasonable suspicion they are stolen, I don't think they would have any cause to make you prove their yours any more than if you had tennis rackets in the car.

 

Many police don't look at it that way. And, tennis rackets are not illegal in NJ. Firearms are. With some exceptions and defenses available.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been told that if you stumble upon a law officer that has an itch on a given day, if your firearms are disclosed to him or her, he or she can be take them until you provide such proof that they are yours. And, I believe that they can be held for an undisclosed amount of time until "proof" is satisfied. Having a COE or a copy of the pistol permit might alleviate that to some extent. I believe that large sums of money on your person can also be detained.

A COE does not prove that you own a firearm. I retain all of my COE's, whether I still own the firearm or not, to simply prove when I was and wasn't in possession of the firearms in case the need arises. The fact that I still have the COE's for firearms that I've sold proves nothing regarding who currently owns them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been told that if you stumble upon a law officer that has an itch on a given day, if your firearms are disclosed to him or her, he or she can be take them until you provide such proof that they are yours. And, I believe that they can be held for an undisclosed amount of time until "proof" is satisfied. Having a COE or a copy of the pistol permit might alleviate that to some extent. I believe that large sums of money on your person can also be detained.

 

Look, legally you don't need a COE, or a FPID to have your guns. That is not what they are for.

 

As for a cop with a bug up his a**, no paperwork is going to save you. I'll pass on two stories about the west point shooting team that I have been told.

 

First one:

 

They are coming to a match in NJ in their usual crappy van/truck/whatever you want to call it where everyone can sit inside. They get pulled over for something generally legitimate (forget if it was speeding, mechanical issue , etc.) The guy driving the truck is active duty military, on duty, and has his sidearm on as required by his orders. The cop decided that his interpretation of the law trumped the guys orders, and started escalating the situation. When it was explained that he was armed under orders due to transporting fully automatic weapons, the cop decided that that activity was ALSO illegal and started escalating it further. fortunately for the cop, his backup showed up just before he committed suicide by stupidity and was informed in no uncertain terms that he was really, really wrong.

 

Another year, the crappy van/truck/whatever decided it didn't want to run. So the same guy had his cadets pile up in the bed of a pickup with their rack of M4s, and drove to the match that way. Apparently a truck full of guys illegally riding in the bed of a truck wearing camo with ready access to a buttload of firepower looked like it was above all the officers pay grade that day.

 

Some cops won't bust you even if you are doing something illegal, for whatever reason. Some cops will try to arrest you no matter the fact that you are obeying the low, or common sense says that they should calm their ego down and engage their brain.

 

Common sense says sort it out without getting killed, which usually means after being arrested and with the help of a lawyer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many police don't look at it that way. And, tennis rackets are not illegal in NJ. Firearms are. With some exceptions and defenses available.

Firearms are not illegal in NJ (AW, SBR excluded). Possession of firearms is restricted to certain exemptions, and if you're within those exemptions there is nothing for the police to verify with regards to whether or not the firearm belongs to you or not. People sometimes get in trouble because they are illegally possessing a firearm that is lawfully theirs(for example: keeping a loaded handgun in their car without a carry license). The issue for a cop to figure out when he stops you (if they even care in the first place), is how and to where it's being transported, not if it's stolen or not - again unless they have a reasonable suspicion to think you are involved in some sort of other criminal activity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

while people will tell you "it is good to have just in case.." there is absolutely no form of protection having your FPID card will grant you.. even if you are stopped it tells the police ONE thing and only one thing.. and that is on the day it happened to have been issued, you were not a prohibited person.. ANYTHING could have happened since then.. so really it does nothing IMO..

 

unless of course you are joy riding with long guns in the trunk.. it is good for that.. but besides that.. its only use is to purchase firearms..

 

Technically correct, but this would fall into the category of unlawful/wrongful arrest. Innocent until proven guilty remember? They cannot arrest you because "anything could have happened." They need to prove that something did happen, and you are now not allowed to own handguns. If you have an FID, they can run you, see if you have warrants, hell, they can run an NICS check at their expense, but other than that, not much they can do. However, this does not mean that some idiot cop doesn't ruin your weekend by holding you until "Monday morning."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I understand this all correctly - I do NOT need a FID or FPID or COE to take a rifle (not an assault or otherwise banned weapon) to a range to shoot. ? However I do need an ID or permit of some sort in order to take a pistol out of the house to shoot at a range or other place ? If this is not correct please explain to me how and why I am wrong. Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

while people will tell you "it is good to have just in case.." there is absolutely no form of protection having your FPID card will grant you.. even if you are stopped it tells the police ONE thing and only one thing.. and that is on the day it happened to have been issued, you were not a prohibited person.. ANYTHING could have happened since then.. so really it does nothing IMO..

 

unless of course you are joy riding with long guns in the trunk.. it is good for that.. but besides that.. its only use is to purchase firearms..

 

Well, if you don't have one, it tells them to certainly look into it further. Of course, they could use discretion, but they would probably find out your status before letting you go. If the guns are taken into custody, I doubt that they would be taken care very well, and even with your "sufficient" proof you might have a job getting them back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I said in another similar post, with all the effing paperwork we fill out in this state and all the records that are kept, the cops seriously just can't find out from the state police is a particular firearm is registered to you in like 2 minutes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...