Jump to content
ChrisJM981

Lack of training for police departments

Recommended Posts

 

Manasquan, NJ --(Ammoland.com)- The recent shooting of an armed murderer outside the Empire State building in NYC has brought to the forefront the issue of training and marksmanship of Police Officers.

To be sure, this is not necessarily an indictment of the Officers involved in dropping the killer after he pointed his handgun at them on a crowded public street. They did what they had to do under the circumstances.

Unfortunately, 9 other innocent bystanders were all wounded by police gunfire, either outright misses or from fragments of missed shots that broke up when they struck pavement or other hard objects. Its also true that the Officers involved had no other option available to them but to open fire, regardless of their surroundings or terrible background.

Again, none of this is meant as a criticism of the Officers involved,they did the best they could, under difficult circumstances and to the level they had been trained to.

There is an old saying amongst professional firearms trainers. “When the SHTF, you won’t rise to the occasion, you’ll default to the level of your training”.

 

 

However this incident, one of many, many others over the years is a stark indictment of the idea, promulgated ad nauseam by Pro Gun Control/Anti Carry Rights advocates, politicians and often high ranking Police Captains and Chiefs; that Police Officers are so highly trained that they are the “Only Ones” that should be able to carry a gun for self defense.

This is yet another in the overflowing dustbin of lies sold to the American Public by those who actively seek to disarm Citizens and leave them defenseless against predators of every stripe, as sacrificial lambs, served up on a smorgasbord of potential victims.

A study conducted by Newsweek in the early 90′s, the last time Gun Control was as central an issue as it is today, found that Officers involved in shootings had an average “miss rate” of 11 percent, while lawfully armed Citizens defending themselves with a gun had an average “miss rate” of only 2 percent. To be sure, there are numerous factors as to why the numbers come out this way. A cop, arriving on the scene after something requiring his or her attention has occurred often has only seconds to analyze the situation, make a decision and take action, as happened in NYC.

Police-Training.jpg

A cop, arriving on the scene after something requiring his or her attention has occurred often has only seconds to analyze the situation, make a decision and take action.

Conversely, for a Citizen being attacked by a mugger or robber, a woman being dragged into an alley,car or having her door kicked in by a violent stalker or ex significant other or a child, home alone when a group of thugs decides to break in to rampage and pillage, to any of them there is no doubt what-so-ever as to who the aggressor is and what their intentions are.

There’s also the fact that bad guys know Police Officers have to follow the rules set for them as far as when they may be permitted to use deadly force, where-as, the armed Citizen is a complete unknown factor, equally as likely to be able to use force to defend themselves as they are to co-operate. The vast majority of bad guys want to live just as much as the next person, hence, the meek surrender of lunatic James Holmes after the Colorado Movie Massacre.

This is also illustrated by the fact that the UK has a “hot burglary” ( defined as when someone is home), what we in the States call a “home invasion” exponentially higher then we have in the US. Because the criminals know the odds are not in their favor that breaking into an occupied home will end with them walking away as opposed to being carted away in an Ambulance or Coroner’s Van.

But there is another factor, one of training. As I noted at the outset, various people and groups have caterwauled for decades that Police Officers are the “Only Ones” highly trained enough to be entrusted to carry a firearm in public to defend themselves. But the rest of us know that not only is that simply not true from the perspective of having the right to defend one’s life, its a ridiculous fallacy to make such an argument and shows both a stunning lack of knowledge about not only what training Police Officers actually receive, but what level of experience and training is also available to Citizens.

Gun Control Groups and their supporters exclaim the urgent need for a Federal or State Law mandating training, then turn around and vilify and demonize people that offer training and those that take such training classes, as Brady Bunch Board Member Joan Peterson did on her blog “CommonGunSense” on July 9th 2012.

” Further, who needs “tactical firearm training”? What country do we live in again? Are we at war?”

The fact is that a majority of gun owners, and an even larger majority of those who have carry permits practice and fire their weapons at a rate significantly greater then your average beat cop. I touched on this very briefly in an earlier article regarding 6,000 rounds of ammunition not really being all that much.

In the aftermath of the Empire State Building Shooting, even some Officers have come forward to state what the rest of us already know and have known for years.

From an NYPD Officer.

•Every officer hired since the introduction of pistols in the NYPD back in the early nineties is NOT allowed to use a revolver as their service weapon. They must choose between a Glock 19, S&W 5946, or a Sig p226. All of these guns are in DAO variant and have NO external safety.

•Everyone who is allowed to carry a gun in the department (not everyone is) has to re-qualify once every six months (give or take, it has been as short as five and as long as nine sometimes).

•MOST NYPD officers fire their FIRST gun, ever in their entire lives, at the police academy, some as young as 21 to as old as 35 shooting for their very first time, and on a DAO pistol.

•The qualifications are HORRIBLE mad get dumbed down every year.

•The NYPD offers once a month training for members to use, on their own time. However, all that is done during these sessions are the same basic dumbed down qualification exercises. You will only receive real help if you outright fail. Missed 12 out of fifty @ 7 yards? GOOD ENOUGH!

•Our tactical training is a joke and maybe ten people in a department of 34K have had Active Shooter training (I am not exaggerating).

There is a lot broken, basically.

Some of our members NEVER take their service weapons out of their gun belts, and never carry ANYTHING off duty. I have seen people with 3 years on have brown rusted rear sights. Some never clean their weapons unless forced to by the firearms unit.

The NYPD has been tight fisted with ammo for the longest time. Take your one box and be happy.

Then there is this study performed by The Rand Corporation, that validates not only the anonymous NYPD Officers comments, but equally applies to nearly every other Police Dept in the Country. In some smaller dept’s, the training is likely even less !

Here are some choice excerpts from the study.

In police academy, recruits get 4.5 hours on “weapons.” It is unclear if that is actual training with their duty issued weapons or if that is about weapons charges. They get 9 hours on “patrol procedures.” There are also 10.5 hours on “street encounters” and 9 hours on “use of force.” They must pass a firearms and tactics course:

Firearms and tactics:
Passing means successfully completing all components of basic firearm course and tactical components. It includes handgun qualification with a minimum of 78 percent hits on a number of stationary targets from fixed firing positions.

Refresher Firearm Training and Re-qualification

The semiannual firearm re-qualification consists of three parts:

  • Lecture: A two-part lecture to remind officers of current safety and tactical issues. The first lecture consists of 38 overhead slides that review drawing the firearm, fundamentals of shooting, accidental discharges, firearm maintenance, and the basics of using OC spray. The second lecture covers department-wide firearm discharge reports, use of force, reflexive shooting, patrol tactics, dogs, and firearm safety.
  • Practice: An opportunity to fire 45 rounds of ammunition at stationary targets at 7-, 15-, and 25-yard distances. Practice is unscored on a tactical pistol course.

Re-qualification: This included firing 50 rounds at stationary targets at 7-, 15-, and 25-yard distances. A minimum of 39 hits is required to qualify.

The current firearm-requalification program is less about making sure officers can effectively use their pistols in real-life situations than it is about meeting legal requirements and professional standards.

Pay particular attention to the bolded part above. Current Police Academy Training standards are less about being able to hit your target and more about meeting an arbitrary legal standard.

Read the rest of the Rand Study for some more eye opening facts.

The NJ Police Training Commission mandates less then 1,000 rounds fired and roughly 35 hours of total instruction time, at least 50 percent of which is classroom time dedicated to policy, procedure and law,to graduate the Academy and significantly less then those amounts to re-qualify every year.

There are any number of private companies and competitive organizations such as Thunder Ranch, Gun Site, Valhalla, NJ based Gun for Hire, the IDPA, IPSC and others that are open to Citizens and virtually ensure those that take the courses or compete on a regular basis will easily achieve and more often then not exceed by wide margins the level of rounds fired, skill, training and accuracy then your average patrol cop anywhere in the Nation.

And this of course is the overarching point. Simply wearing a uniform or carrying a badge does not in any way confer some mystical level of Jedi like proficiency on a person and its a fool’s errand to believe otherwise.

But that wont stop Gun Control Advocates and their supporters from claiming otherwise, denial, misinformation and lies are the currency of their profession.

About Dan RobertsDan Roberts is a grassroots supporter of gun rights that has choosen AmmoLand Shooting Sports News as the perfect outlet for his frank, ‘Jersey Attitude’ filled articles on Guns and Gun Owner Rights. As a resident of the oppressive state of New Jersey he is well placed to be able to discuss the abuses of government against our inalienable rights to keep and bear arms as he writes from deep behind NJ’s Anti-Gun iron curtain. Read more from Dan Roberts or email him at [email protected]

 

To start this off I don't want this to become a cop bashing thread. Nor is it saying CCW holders are better shots than police. I'm posting this to highlight that departments do not give their cadets adequate shooting training. The article has a video embedded with the Empire State Building shooting as well.

 

Do you think police are not given the opportunity to refine their shooting skills? If you're LEO does your department offer the tools to improve your techniques?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are not given enough enough real life firearms training. When you get in a shooting is your target stationary like a q target. No. As always it comes down to budgets. Just do enough to meet the minimum. This is why i decided to take it upon myself to do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most departments downplay their firearms training, and fill their employees heads with the idea that doing the AG Guidelines Minimum is "Enough"..Mine wasnt bad we did some actual "Training" above and beyond merely "Qualifying", and anyone who wanted to shoot on thier own was encouraged to do so..other departments actively DIScourage their people from seeking outside training, or even practicing on their own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know it's completely different, but I do understand the stress element. Just by introducing moving while shooting and the element of being timed my accuracy and capacity to keep focused and be aware of my surroundings are diminished. A moving target that can fire back is a whole different animal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Most departments downplay their firearms training, and fill their employees heads with the idea that doing the AG Guidelines Minimum is "Enough"..Mine wasnt bad we did some actual "Training" above and beyond merely "Qualifying", and anyone who wanted to shoot on thier own was encouraged to do so..other departments actively DIScourage their people from seeking outside training, or even practicing on their own.

 

Why would they discourage their officers from practicing on their own or seeking additional training?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great article. Most of what was written, most of us here already know. The problem still remains. When the majority of the population are unaware of these facts, either intentionally so or just by ignorance, you get this major misconception that police are more trained, qualified, and in general, better then people who are not when it comes to handling and carry firearms. The reality is, this is a terrible and inaccurate generalization, because whether you are or are not a police officer has little to no correlation on your ability to handle firearms. That is to say, it is all up to the individual. Many cops are much more qualified and have much more training then the average gun owner. Many themselves fit the category of being the average gun owner. Many still have less training. Same goes for those who aren't cops. Many have more training then the average LEO. Many have less training. Many still have about the same amount.

 

So why do police get to carry in every state, but the average gun owner's ability to carry encompasses all ranges of the spectrum, from almost no restrictions to outright denial, depending on the state?

 

It is all about control, and as it works out, ends up being pretty arbitrary. As someone mentioned above, some departments actually DISCOURAGE it's officers from seeking additional training? Why would they possibly do this? Well, I would imagine it is simple. They want control. And they use arbitrary guidelines and the excuse/reason that you might receive bad training. And liability. All these things though, when it comes down to it, are legal or political reasons. They ignore important factors, including basic ones like, whether people die/are killed or not. Because lives are not as important as money and power. Sorry if you get killed. You living might cost me more money...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

other departments actively DIScourage their people from seeking outside training

 

This I can kind of understand. If the LEO backing you up is expecting you to do one thing by official policy, and you do something an outside trainer taught you,

a bad incident may occur.

 

 

or even practicing on their own.

 

Now this is just f'd up. How can practicing what you were taught be a bad thing? Unless, the powers that be, acknowledge what they are teaching is crap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately the fact is most depts train u to qualify. I have heard stories of in the past my dept keeping you after to do active shooting training (running finding cover shoot and move) now we show up shoot our 100 rounds if your good with your service weapon and 100 for your off duty. It has been brought up in the past but the rising cost of ammo and large amount of qualifying officers has raised over the years with the cost of weapons and ammo increasing. There is 200 something officers at my work. Probably 170 choose to carry and about 60 of them can pass a qualification on the first try. To add to that probably 40 of them don't shoot between qualifications and just leave there gun at work. At 32 cents per 45round that adds up. So maybe more funding should goto firearms training and less on other b.s. that the town's and counties seem to waste it on. Maybe the qualifications should change every 6 months. Your spring can be a shoot and move and your fall a more traditional type qualification. Actual night fire not simulated. Advanced weapons training once a year to familiarize yourself with other weapons you may come in contact with during a actual gun fight (swat weapons or common weapons offenders use) how hard would it be to show an officer how to safely operate and make safe common weapons u may encounter. Unfortunately from what I have seen this doesn't happen. And with the increase of gun violence in the media I would think the genius law makers and politicians would make the average Joe happy and increase funding to train officers in something many lack.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup my dept is over 1600. So training costs are huge. So we dont do whats not required. OT is big during training so they try to minimize that.

Even now the state gave my dept a waiver and now we only qualify once a year....thought I had fall shoot coming up but got a memo saying not until April.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow..once a year. Its sad. The only time i see people going to the range on their own time is right before quals. They think shooting once before qualifying will make them a better shooter. Even sadder. Im the crazy buff guy because i shoot a lot outside of work

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow..once a year. Its sad. The only time i see people going to the range on their own time is right before quals. They think shooting once before qualifying will make them a better shooter. Even sadder. Im the crazy buff guy because i shoot a lot outside of work

Lmao I'm the crazy zombie guy because I own an ar. Lmao. Firearms training should be just as important as use of force training. It's a huge responsibility to carry a gun. You would think more money would goto training. It's scary I get lasered more times at quals then at my local range. Isn't That scary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Firearms and active shooter should be paramount. They also dont focus enough on law updates. All around is actually lacking now that i really think about it

I agree. I have to know 10a and 2c. I haven't heard crap about either since I graduated the academy. There is a lot of down time in my line of work. We have desktop computers.. so why couldn't they do online training classes or email PowerPoints out with law updates. Fairly simple. Say 1 hour a week it does a review and the rest is voluntary. It would help Leos be better Leos, and lower dept. Accountability. Hmmm that's an idea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Careful now! Once someone gets that idea, it becomes death by powerpoint, and nobody learns anything. Trust me. It seems like every week I have to do some new powerpoint based training course on something, and I definitely don't just click through it...........

 

 

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I said it on another thread. Although, it's a GAME. IDPA is a great option. Hell, even make a stage designed for LEO guys.

 

Not real enough training. I would love to see more simunitions, more active shooter. Hell i would even take the interactive computer simulations on the drop down screen with the projector

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not real enough training. I would love to see more simunitions, more active shooter. Hell i would even take the interactive computer simulations on the drop down screen with the projector

 

Nothing will replace real guns, real recoil and real "stages". But your above options would help as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vote #2 for IDPA stages. Lots of LEOS shoot IDPA, and I shoot it with them. Great gun handling skills, mag changes, use of cover, slicing the pie, etc.

 

Shooting steel while standing still teaches speed & mag changes. Shooting IDPA takes it a few steps further, including weak-hand and strong-hand only stages, recovering a parner or victim while returning fire, etc. Walk a mile in my shoes and then talk to me about how IDPA isn't a valuable training tool!

 

Depts. set minimum standards so that the vast majority of average Cops (with just average skills) can stay on-the-job, and the unions defend this mediocrity. Anybody that's really "good at it" gets pulled off the street to become a trainer in some depts., thus keeping any possible shining stars out of any SHTF situations........

 

Like I said, I've done a lot in my 44 years behind guns, and I really enjoy and respect shooting with LEO's!

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A teacher once told me it takes the same amount of time to fail at something then is does to succeed... if your going to have to take time to qualify, why not do it in a manner that is actually productive? instead of shooting at a target 7 yards away, make it further, how about smaller, and possibly moving or with no hit zones? The average shooter, this seems like a complete joke, even new guys would say, what the hell are they thinking? Complete and total lack of responsibility on the departments side, to put under-trained LEO's on the street, and putting the people they are supposed to protect in danger. People could probably sue for negligence, considering 9 people were wounded in the incident in NYC. If they were forced to qualify with no hit zones, i'm guessing they would probably have chooses their shot's a little better. Instead of, what the NYC police is basically known for, which is point and unload. If the guy took a hostage and was using a human shield, would they just litter both hostage and bad guy with bullets? Do you just shoot into a crowd of people because a guy is pointing a gun at you? These guys had some serious balls to think there best possible option was to unload into a crowd of people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A teacher once told me it takes the same amount of time to fail at something then is does to succeed... if your going to have to take time to qualify, why not do it in a manner that is actually productive? instead of shooting at a target 7 yards away, make it further, how about smaller, and possibly moving or with no hit zones? The average shooter, this seems like a complete joke, even new guys would say, what the hell are they thinking? Complete and total lack of responsibility on the departments side, to put under-trained LEO's on the street, and putting the people they are supposed to protect in danger. People could probably sue for negligence, considering 9 people were wounded in the incident in NYC. If they were forced to qualify with no hit zones, i'm guessing they would probably have chooses their shot's a little better. Instead of, what the NYC police is basically known for, which is point and unload. If the guy took a hostage and was using a human shield, would they just litter both hostage and bad guy with bullets? Do you just shoot into a crowd of people because a guy is pointing a gun at you? These guys had some serious balls to think there best possible option was to unload into a crowd of people.

 

I don't think the officers who unloaded 'towards' the bad guy had THAT big of balls, but I do think it goes along with your point about 'point and unload'. It all comes down to training, and from what I've heard in terms of NYPD, everyone but SWAT, drug enforcement squads, undercover ops, and other special ops if you will, all get trained at the minimum especially with firearms. So when you have a few low-ranking officers standing on the corner watching a gunmen run out of a building after hearing shots fired, the officers go by their instinct which is unfortunately, point and unload. That's where we have, yes, training, come back into play. You practice drills hundreds, if not thousands of times and when you need to do that drill in combat or on the streets, you will most likely back to instinct (training) and do what you need to do in order to eliminate the threat and survive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And I am not saying that it's easy, not at all, so please don't take it like that. It's never, "oh, practice an active shooter drill at the range and you will take him out immediately when a situation like this presents itself." Absolutely not. I am saying that your skills, knowledge, how to treat a dangerous situation, how to act under stress, and I can go on, all come down to training. When your training lacks, all of those things lack.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dont think anyone on here would say, "It's easy", or even imply that. Most of us go the range often, and know that only practice gets better grouping... I noticed right off the bat every time i hit the range, my shot placement gets better, i have friends i try to teach when they arent hitting their mark, and they say, but im pointing it here, why and i hitting there. And my answer is always, practice, Your hands aren't a vice grip, bolted to the table, they move. You need to find a grip and trigger finger placement that works for you. If you have only shot at a target 7 yards away, do you even know what bullet drop is at that point? or how to even compensate for it, accurately? The fact is, the more training you have with different aspects, the more suited you are to actually be productive in such scenarios. The military trains with live fire, and they try and mimic the stress of battle. It would seem LEO qualifications are the opposite, as in how do we make this less stressful. I'm sure most LEO's on here would like more training, even though they probably do a lot on there own dime.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The simple truth of the matter is that Cops as a whole, are simply a cross section of society. They(we) are not shockingly different then anyone else, and much like any social group where only a small percent are actually actively interested in things like firearms, martial arts, and the like, Police are shockingly no different. Where common sense should dictate (if for no other reason than a certain degree of self preservation) interest should exist, just like a form of continuing education for other professions, it simply does not for many and trying to mandate training fails often due in part to the relatively small percentage of Officers who actually want it or will willingly attend it. The supervisors are simply an extension of the Officers, so many of them(us) also live in the deluded dream that they(we) are sufficiently trained. Here's a good read from a Cops perspective on life inside a PD...take note of the small percentage of the "warrior" ethos...

 

 

 

The World of Feudal Law Enforcement

Written by Scott Oldham

Law Enforcement is a calling more than a profession. Or at least it should be. However, some don’t see it as such and this attitude diminishes us all. Some come to the job each day just as would a medieval serf doing the king’s bidding. Strap on the belt and pull on the helmet to begin the day, hang them up at the end of the day, and it is Miller time. Nice and easy, no real thought process, no inner consternation, nothing hard with which to manage or wrestle with. Just doing what I am told to do in the manner I am told to do it.

 

A huge percentage of the overall law enforcement workforce are simply call takers and nothing more. This should not come as a shock. We have all thought of this at one time or another. However, these officers are the workers and they are needed. These people get the day to day responsibilities of police work done but do not expect them to go over and above the call.

 

It isn’t because they are derelict in their duties, but rather it is part of their overall personal make-up. They are satisfied taking the calls, making the reports, and working the accidents. But they are not the ones that have that edge. They do not have the glow of “I’ll make everything all right” that surrounds some others.

 

As sergeants and supervisors, we need the call takers in the worst way as they are our order maintenance staff. They will respond to the crashes, they will respond to the shop-lifters, and they will be the ones that take reports about absolutely nothing of any importance in 56 specific flavors each day.

 

But at the end of the day, just as with the medieval serfs, these people will hang up the belt and helmet and go home and be the same as every other person on the planet. They will mentally check out for the day never looking back. Might as well punch the time clock on the way out of the quarry just like Fred and Barney did so long ago.

 

There is nothing at all wrong with this. However, as sergeants we need to recognize this and factor it into any long term planning or goals that we have for our personnel. Some do not aspire to be more than they are. Do we, as supervisors, really want to only cultivate worker bees? When the proverbial wolf is at the door, who shall we send? A drone?

 

But there are also those who walk amongst us as knights of the ages gone by, strong, true, and dedicated. These individuals represent the smallest fraction of the overall population. Not just law enforcement, but any job has only a small fraction of this type of individual. These are the ones that are the edge. In our business, these are the warriors. Often hard to manage, since they are driven by the inner fire only a few know, they are the ones that supervisors need to covet, need to build.

 

Not every knight is Galahad, so all will not be perfect. However, every one of these people has the capability to be tempered in the fire as long as you recognize what you have and do not squander it or allow it to be corrupted by outside forces. These are the officers that will stand and draw the line between order and chaos when things are the worst.

 

Just because all of our officers do the same job of enforcing the law does not make them the same type of individuals. Sorting the two is often difficult due to a variety of factors. Most departments do not accept the knights well, or they look at them differently, as aberrations outside of the norm of most in law enforcement.

 

Being one of these individuals in a group of officers is likewise sometimes difficult. Often mis-represented or slandered by lesser individuals who have delusions of popular acceptance, the “if he were more like us” people often look at these officers as paranoid or say “he just needs to relax.”

 

As sergeants, we work with a variety of differing personalities and must make our command work well together as a whole, despite the differing levels of dedication, skill, and ability. We need to realize that we are dealing with two separate and distinctive classes of individuals.

 

As the leader of your group, it is incumbent upon you to assign duties that are within the capabilities of your officers. There will be those who excel at investigations, there will be those who excel at traffic accidents, and there will be those who perform other tasks needed, such as nuisance complaints. As a group, they will maintain order in our society. They are the “Serve” part of “Protect and Serve.”

 

But the other group embodies the predators of the species. These are the car searching, disturbance handling, field contacting, criminal arrest making machines that are the first on the scene of anything resembling a priority one call. While the serfs are out sippin’ on a fresh cup, these are the men and women that are out kicking over stones at 0-dark-thirty just to see what will slither out from underneath.

 

These are the ones that ride to the rescue when the call-takers just happen to stumble onto something and get in over their heads. These people are the ones that will crawl over broken glass to get to an officer in trouble. These are the true heroes in our business. These are the people we need more of.

 

As sergeants, it is our duty to support both of these groups. Without a doubt, we need both. It is, however, very important that we realize who falls into which category. Do not push the serf to become more than he is as there will be problems that are often dramatic in nature. Be ready to support the knight when he needs protection as there will be times when he kicks over the wrong rock, at the wrong time, in the wrong place, giving rise to complaints and other issues from which to shield them.

 

Teach both groups when necessary, and scream and cajole when appropriate, but support both groups always. Attempt to build more knights as they make up the smallest percentage. They are the ones that will pull society from the fire of criminal activity. They are the “Protect” part of “Protect and Serve” and in these perilous times we need them more than ever before.

 

Scott Oldham is a Supervisory Sergeant with the Bloomington Indiana Police Department where he serves in the Operations Division as well as being one of the Team Leaders for the department’s Tactical Unit. He can be reached at [email protected]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...