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1-Point Slings: Who makes the best?

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I need to add a 1-point sling to my AR setup and I'd like your opinions on who makes the best sling. Only requirement is that it be QD compatible.

 

I've seen offerings from Blue Force Gear, BLACKHAWK, and so on but I'm having trouble deciphering what exactly the pros and cons of one brand over another are.

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http://njgunforums.com/forum/index.php/topic/52226-need-advice-on-ar-sling-mount/?fromsearch=1

 

Halfway down the page see High Exposure's post about getting whacked in the junk with your muzzle courtesy of a 1 point sling. I have a "good" 1 point, but it fails miserably at everything except standing still with it on.

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Don't know about best, but know OK one for $5.25 and free shipping (1350 reviews can't be wrong). 

That's how I learned 2 things about 1 point slings: 

1. It's very cool. 

2. Not very practical. Even if it doesn't damage your junk, it will  limit your mobility and live bruises. 

I can believe there are situations when 1 point sling can be useful, but so far couldn't imagine any. 

No, I don't regret buying this sling for $5.25 - it's steel cool :D and quality is much better than I expected. 

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I like the non-padded version, but, I generally wear mine over armor which negates the need for the padding.

 

I also find the the padding slows down transitions a little - doesn't slide as easily - and that the padded part never seems to stay where I want it.

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I like the non-padded version, but, I generally wear mine over armor which negates the need for the padding.

 

I also find the the padding slows down transitions a little - doesn't slide as easily - and that the padded part never seems to stay where I want it.

 

Thanks for the info HE... That's exactly why I was asking... I figured that the padding could get in the way.

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Thanks for the info HE... That's exactly why I was asking... I figured that the padding could get in the way.

Keep in my that is just my subjective preference. I know other guys that swear by them.

 

Simplicity mostly.

What's more important to you - simplicity or capability?

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If you want the best, there's only one:

 

http://originalsoegear.com/1point.html

 

Choose your adapter (I used a mash hook) and adjust the sling properly. 

 

I'm pretty sure that's the one I have. Maybe I'm not using it properly. :unknw:

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The way I look at it, and the way I approach my training, is that there is no simple or complex when it comes to shooting or gear. There is capable and incapable.

 

In other words, shooting a rifle is basic. Those that shoot it better accomplish these basics with more speed, increased effeciency, higher accuracy, and at a higher level of accomplishment - unconscious competence - where they can manipulate the gun on a level that appears to others to be almost instinctive.

 

When training your gear is either up to the task at hand, or it isn't. It will help you achieve your goals of faster times, economy of motion, and tighter groups, and intuitive manipulations or it won't. In some cases it may even counter your effects by working against you, or forcing you to develop/adopt and inferior manual of arms/method/tactic to work around your gear.

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The way I look at it, and the way I approach my training, is that there is no simple or complex when it comes to shooting or gear. There is capable and incapable.

 

In other words, shooting a rifle is basic. Those that shoot it better accomplish these basics with more speed, increased effeciency, higher accuracy, and at a higher level of accomplishment - unconscious competence - where they can manipulate the gun on a level that appears to others to be almost instinctive.

 

When training your gear is either up to the task at hand, or it isn't. It will help you achieve your goals of faster times, economy of motion, and tighter groups, and intuitive manipulations or it won't. In some cases it may even counter your effects by working against you, or forcing you to develop/adopt and inferior manual of arms/method/tactic to work around your gear.

 

So what are you saying in the context of the discussion here?

 

I'm open to using other sling options if it can be well reasoned. I'm not necessarily committed to the idea of a single point sling, however I see a lot of beating around the bush rather than actual discussion of the subject. Please feel free to speak frankly.

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Single point slings blow goats.

 

Quick adjust 2 point slings (Think BFG VCAS or Viking VTAC) are the way to go. They are superior in every way to single point slings.

 

I would not recommend any single point slings over a quick adjust 2 point, hence my initial reply with two QA 2 point slings when you asked for single point sling recommendations.

 

Rear attachment point goes to where you would attach a single point sling, front attachment as close to the receiver/rear of the handguards as possible.

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Single point slings blow goats.

 

Quick adjust 2 point slings (Think BFG VCAS or Viking VTAC) are the way to go. They are superior in every way to single point slings.

 

I would not recommend any single point slings over a quick adjust 2 point, hence my initial reply with two QA 2 point slings when you asked for single point sling recommendations.

 

Rear attachment point goes to where you would attach a single point sling, front attachment as close to the receiver/rear of the handguards as possible.

 

Thank you!

 

I would be attaching the sling to a PWS Mk116 mod 1 which has QD point around the castle nut area (if it had one) and at the base of the hand-guard before the mounting areas. Here's a picture:

 

M116RA1B_L_1.jpg

 

That should work out nicely. I'll take a look at the two options you threw out.

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So what are you saying in the context of the discussion here?

 

I'm open to using other sling options if it can be well reasoned. I'm not necessarily committed to the idea of a single point sling, however I see a lot of beating around the bush rather than actual discussion of the subject. Please feel free to speak frankly.

 

 

if you "drop your carbine" to transition to a sidearm and move with any purpose... a single point sling allows the carbine to flop all over the place in a violent uncontrolled manner.... as HE put it.. they are garbage.. I find it only usable on the tiniest AR I have.. and that is only 7 inches..  anything larger than that was a mess with single point.. 

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Transitioning shoulders is always talked about as if it is a mandatory skill that is used every 5 seconds in real world deadly force situations, while in reality for most people, it is just a nice option to have sometimes when shooting around cover. There are a lot of reasons why being able to switch sides/shoulders is a good thing, but there are also many times/places where, while it may be indicated, the disparity in your speed and precision while shooting wrong-handed may dictate you stay shooting stronghand. But... That may be a conversation for another time.

 

In any event, switching from stong to support shoulder and back is easily accomplished with a quick adjust 2-point sling. It is much easier to demonstrate than explain but I will try.

 

There are 2 different methods, but they start out the same way.

First the sling has to be set up properly.

Set the rear sling point on the strong side as close to the receiver as possible. Set the front sling point on the support side as close to the receiver as possible. (Follow the manufacturer's recommendation and instructions when setting your sling-length.) You need to set the overall length of the sling just right to what you wear when shooting. This will depend on armor/chest rig/weather appropriate clothes/body type. The adjuster should be easy to reach throughout the entire length of adjustment and the long gun should be snug to your chest when cinched down all the way (I also like to roll the long gun 180 degrees outboard (optic to the strong side) so the sling traps the gun against my chest a little better).

 

When switching shoulders:

First, take your support hand and open/loosen the sling with the quick adjuster. While you are manipulating the adjuster, drop your elbow through the sling so your arm is free and the sling is just around your neck. This gives you the slack you need to move the long gun over to your other shoulder. Now you are ready to switch to the support side.

 

Method 1:

Once the sling is loose, without changing your hand position, push the rifle straight away from your strong side shoulder as far as you can/as far as the sling will allow, the bring it straight back to your support side shoulder, rotating the top of the rifle slightly inboard. You may need to actually close your strong side eye the first few times to help you quickly pick up the dot/irons. The advantages here are that it is a little quicker, and you can still easily use the "switchology" as it is set up on your rifle - white light, vis. laser, IR light, IR laser, safety, etc... The disadvantages are that it can be uncomfortable, is hard to do in armor, is hard to build most of your assymetric cover positions from here, and is hard to shoot on the move.

 

Method 2:

Once the sling is loose and you have dropped your elbow, take your support hand off the sling adjuster and place it back on the long gun in its normal position (if you are a magwell grip shooter - and you shouldn't be - you will need to move your support hand out onto the handguards). Now take your strong hand and place it on the magwell in a magwell grip and push the rifle straight away from your strong side shoulder as far as you can/as far as the sling will allow, then bring it straight back to your support side shoulder (You may need to dip the muzzle and lift the stock slightly to clear some of the sling). Once the rifle is secure in your support shoulder, move your support hand to the master firing grip and take your strong hand and move it to where you normally place your support hand out on the handguards. If you are a right handed shooter, you should be shooting now as if you were a lefty and vice-versa. All positions are still available (including the asymmetrical and rollover shooting positions) but in mirror image and it is much more comfortable, albeit strange feeling, method. Keep in mind that your safety will be manipulated by your left trigger finger. You may find it difficult to use your lights/lasers etc... But with some familiarity you will figure out what works. With a little practice this can be done in one fairly fluid and effecient motion, and pretty quickly.

 

With both methods, to go back to your strong hand from your support hand, you simply do the same steps as above and fix the sling when you have time.

 

If you are having a hard time visualizing it grab a copy of Kyle Lamb's "Green Eyes and Black Rifles". I think there is a whole chapter with photos devoted to support side shooting an AR (applies to shotguns too). Even better, get to one of his courses. That's where I learned this (among a Canadian butt load of other cool stuff).

Side note: If you own an AR and plan on doing anything more than target shooting you should get Kyle's book anyway. Excellent supplement - not a substitute - for training).

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I also don't use or practice shooting my rifle for urban/building clearing/sub 50 yard shooting so keep that in mind with regards to my opinions.

 

Stay safe and rejoice that we live in a country that allows us to have such great tools.

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quality and real function for a rifleman's sling = tab gear ras

That TAB RAS is a clone of the Viking VTAC sling with the addition of an arm cuff - The arm cuff being useful for high-power and national match competition but relatively useless on a fighting carbine.

 

I also don't use or practice shooting my rifle for urban/building clearing/sub 50 yard shooting so keep that in mind with regards to my opinions.

Gotcha.

 

Shooting and fighting with a gun are two completely different animals and Marksmanship/shooting is only one component of the fighting process.

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Agreed with everyone, single points are just damn awkward if youre not shooting.  Any kind of pistol transition, have to use 2 hands, or even walking around with the rifle and it will be flopping around everywhere, punching you in your yam bag, or flagging your feet.  2pt QA keeps it nice and tight on your chest or tight to your back and off the ground if you want it out of the way for a little while. 

 

Method 2:
Once the sling is loose and you have dropped your elbow, take your support hand off the sling adjuster and place it back on the long gun in its normal position (if you are a magwell grip shooter - and you shouldn't be - you will need to move your support hand out onto the handguards). Now take your strong hand and place it on the magwell in a magwell grip and push the rifle straight away from your strong side shoulder as far as you can/as far as the sling will allow, then bring it straight back to your support side shoulder (You may need to dip the muzzle and lift the stock slightly to clear some of the sling). Once the rifle is secure in your support shoulder, move your support hand to the master firing grip and take your strong hand and move it to where you normally place your support hand out on the handguards. If you are a right handed shooter, you should be shooting now as if you were a lefty and vice-versa. All positions are still available (including the asymmetrical and rollover shooting positions) but in mirror image and it is much more comfortable, albeit strange feeling, method. Keep in mind that your safety will be manipulated by your left trigger finger. You may find it difficult to use your lights/lasers etc... But with some familiarity you will figure out what works. With a little practice this can be done in one fairly fluid and effecient motion, and pretty quickly.

 

Just a side note to this:  

If you are a right handed shooter, make sure you dont try to use a magwell grip (agreed shouldnt have anyway) after switching shoulders to weak.  It almost definitely will cause a malfunction.  I didn't follow the steps correctly and ended bouncing a spent casing back into the chamber.   :punish:

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That TAB RAS is a clone of the Viking VTAC sling with the addition of an arm cuff - The arm cuff being useful for high-power and national match competition but relatively useless on a fighting carbine.

 

 

Gotcha.

 

Shooting and fighting with a gun are two completely different animals and Marksmanship/shooting is only one component of the fighting process.

 

Thumbs up!

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