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I ain't planning nuthin, I'm just askin. Since to bring a case before SCOTUS, one has to have suffered harm or loss due to a law, what about carrying w/o a permit? One would get arrested... What would the sacrificial lamb have to go through on his way to a hearing before SCOTUS? Like I said before, I'm just askin.

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5 years in prison.  And it's likely SCOTUS would never hear the case, they only choose a small percentage of cases each year.  If they did, by the time your case made it through all the appeal courts on the way to SCOTUS, you'd be out of prison. 

 

The best you might get would be a dismissal of the felony charges you already served (although NJ would tack on others that wouldn't be overturned). 

 

The worst is that the case is heard after Justis Kennedy retires a new Obama appointee votes No to the right to bear arms and the whole country starts losing their rights along with ours.

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The worst is that the case is heard after Justis Kennedy retires a new Obama appointee votes No to the right to bear arms and the whole country starts losing their rights along with ours.

 

That would get real ugly real quick.

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