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Anyone have any experience with "security film" products for windows? I've got some big windows that always sort of make me grimmace when I think about the overall security of my home.

 

I've read some accounts that seem to indicate the films can make a shattered window behave like a windshield, in that the shattering casues the glass to spider outward and lock itself into the frame, meaning it takes many additional hard strikes to actually smash through. I.E. Providing tons of audible warning that someone is smashing their way into your house.

 

However, I've also seen a few posts on random forums where guys say that the majority of films will simply make the glass fall out of the window frame in a single piece held together by the film, because it isn't really possibly to create a strong enough bond bewteen the film & the window frame.

 

Thoughts?

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I install window film by trade. I will answer any questions in that area as best I can.

 

Ill see if we have any larger panes at the shop that are junk. If so ill grab a bat and make a video for you guys.

 

Zell-

 

There are many misconceptions out there about "security" and "blast" films. This product WILL NOT prevent someone from breaking into your home, or even slow them down much. Security films are nothing but thick clear films, typically 4-8 mils thick. On a standard installation, the film will end a few mm from the window frame. Therefore on a tempered window, the window will still shatter in the frame, and one large piece will fall out. There is something called an attachment system, which attaches the film to the frame. This will typically retain the entire pane. However, if I go at your sliding door with a bat, ill be in within 15 seconds or so.

 

Jrzyguy-

 

You can probably go with a laminated glass door, although your town may require that it be tempered.

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Thanks very much for responding with your thoughts, Banka871

 

However, if I go at your sliding door with a bat, ill be in within 15 seconds or so.

 

I would still consider it taking roughly 10-20 seconds to smash through my windows a big improvement over the [essentially] instant access of the window breaking instantly from a single hard smash, unless the price to benefit ratio is completely out of wack & it'd make more sense to start from scratch with windows designed to excel at 'security'. 

 

You mentioned that you install films of this sort as part of your trade.  In general, what kinds of scenarios and/or purposes are the films a good solution for?

 

Thanks again for any insight you're able to offer.

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After 9/11 we did a lot of federal work on courthouses and associated buildings in the city for blast mitigation. IMO its a lot of wishful thinking on their part. It is there to prevent shards of tempered glass from going airborne in the event of an explosion, providing the explosion doesnt level the building. It probably works best for nearby explosions that aren't targeting your particular building. Obviously if someone tosses a grenade, or parks a car bomb next to your facility...it doesn't really do much.

 

There also safety applications for non tempered large panes, to keep large shards from falling in the event of a break. Another is to turn windows into safety glass. Say you are doing construction on your home, you order a window tempered for a certain area (such as a staircase or bathtub), but they accidentally send you annealed. A lot of towns will allow you to install the film making it a safety window. Depends on the inspector.

 

Lastly it can be used as a sacrificial barrier in anti graffiti applications. Someone tags your window? Nbd...tear the film off.

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I install window film by trade. I will answer any questions in that area as best I can.

 

Ill see if we have any larger panes at the shop that are junk. If so ill grab a bat and make a video for you guys.

 

Jrzyguy-

 

You can probably go with a laminated glass door, although your town may require that it be tempered.

Banka - thanks for the response.. So my thoughts have always been to find out where I can purchase this film and apply to my sliding doors- at least to slow down anyone.. #2 - we have that narrow decorative window next to our front door and I've wondered if I can get the same thing to keep someone from just shattering the glass and sticking their hand in to unlock the front door? 

Thoughts?

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Banka - thanks for the response.. So my thoughts have always been to find out where I can purchase this film and apply to my sliding doors- at least to slow down anyone.. #2 - we have that narrow decorative window next to our front door and I've wondered if I can get the same thing to keep someone from just shattering the glass and sticking their hand in to unlock the front door? 

Thoughts?

 

Putting up a pane of lexan behind the window would probably be a better idea.  or both.

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Banka - thanks for the response.. So my thoughts have always been to find out where I can purchase this film and apply to my sliding doors- at least to slow down anyone.. #2 - we have that narrow decorative window next to our front door and I've wondered if I can get the same thing to keep someone from just shattering the glass and sticking their hand in to unlock the front door?

Thoughts?

Teehee. Ever done film before? Its harder than it looks. Send me a PM, Ill talk to my boss about selling you some. As far as your front door goes, same principal. It will slow someone down slightly, but they will get through. Do you have the lead inside the sidelight?

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 I've wondered if I can get the same thing to keep someone from just shattering the glass and sticking their hand in to unlock the front door? 

Thoughts?

Install a deadbolt that is keyed on both sides and hang the key away from the side lite but accessible to family members.

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Security doors that are designed to look like regular doors, I have them on my house. They have a steel "core" but a wood exterior.

Dead bolts I have are designed where if someone inserts the wrong key or tries to pick it they perm. lock and need to be drilled out.

 

Back doors also have 2x4's that drop into brackets when I'm out of the house, that combined with the security doors...good luck kicking 'em in :)

 

Windows in the "gun room" are tinted black, behing them steel bars.

 

All windows are "shatter resistant", windows that are not used are secured with nails.

 

Property is fenced in.

 

"punji stick" traps around my fence/yeard. solid steel 3 foot rods and hit them with a grinder for a sharp needle point.

 

Razor ribbon hidden along in the shrubs and painted black.

 

On the second floor roof/landing have that rigged with small steel spikes painted black and secured into 2x8's.

 

Security cameras (8 total) watching/recording the property 24/7.

 

30KW Generator wired to the house.

 

If things ever got REAL bad, I have 1,000 feet of Razor ribbon I can spool around the entire property and create a sterile perimeter.

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Security doors that are designed to look like regular doors, I have them on my house. They have a steel "core" but a wood exterior.

Dead bolts I have are designed where if someone inserts the wrong key or tries to pick it they perm. lock and need to be drilled out.

 

Back doors also have 2x4's that drop into brackets when I'm out of the house, that combined with the security doors...good luck kicking 'em in :)

 

Windows in the "gun room" are tinted black, behing them steel bars.

 

All windows are "shatter resistant", windows that are not used are secured with nails.

 

Property is fenced in.

 

"punji stick" traps around my fence/yeard. solid steel 3 foot rods and hit them with a grinder for a sharp needle point.

 

Razor ribbon hidden along in the shrubs and painted black.

 

On the second floor roof/landing have that rigged with small steel spikes painted black and secured into 2x8's.

 

Security cameras (8 total) watching/recording the property 24/7.

 

30KW Generator wired to the house.

 

If things ever got REAL bad, I have 1,000 feet of Razor ribbon I can spool around the entire property and create a sterile perimeter.

Do you prefer crocodiles or alligators in your moat?

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Teehee. Ever done film before? Its harder than it looks. Send me a PM, Ill talk to my boss about selling you some. As far as your front door goes, same principal. It will slow someone down slightly, but they will get through. Do you have the lead inside the sidelight?

 

No lead in the side light- just small windows vertically stacked.

 

Install a deadbolt that is keyed on both sides and hang the key away from the side lite but accessible to family members.

 

Wife won't allow it just in case there is a fire emergency and she needs to get out.. she always fumbles with keys and well, that was all she wrote. I pick and choose my battles carefully, and this isn't worth the debate :)

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Security doors that are designed to look like regular doors, I have them on my house. They have a steel "core" but a wood exterior.

Dead bolts I have are designed where if someone inserts the wrong key or tries to pick it they perm. lock and need to be drilled out.

 

Back doors also have 2x4's that drop into brackets when I'm out of the house, that combined with the security doors...good luck kicking 'em in :)

 

Windows in the "gun room" are tinted black, behing them steel bars.

 

All windows are "shatter resistant", windows that are not used are secured with nails.

 

Property is fenced in.

 

"punji stick" traps around my fence/yeard. solid steel 3 foot rods and hit them with a grinder for a sharp needle point.

 

Razor ribbon hidden along in the shrubs and painted black.

 

On the second floor roof/landing have that rigged with small steel spikes painted black and secured into 2x8's.

 

Security cameras (8 total) watching/recording the property 24/7.

 

30KW Generator wired to the house.

 

If things ever got REAL bad, I have 1,000 feet of Razor ribbon I can spool around the entire property and create a sterile perimeter.

DAM

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Lets not forget the best defense is a well trained firearms owner with a good set of eyes and ears

.

 

 

Eh, as important a piece of the puzzle as I'd consider that, it's a last line of defense & has a lot of short comings as a primary strategy.

 

1) Completely ineffective against burglary attempts that occur when no one is home

 

2) Expensive & time consuming to maintain, compared to more passive measures for hardening one's home.  Sure, the firearms themselves aren't too needy, but remaining effective with them requires regular practice & ammunition for said practice.  If we really want to optimize our effectiveness with firearms, formal training is called for, which is additional time & money [well spent, certainly].  Luckily, many of us enjoy that and don't find it too challenging to do that at present.  But, if life suddenly throws a lot at us and we can't make it to the range as we'd like to, our effectiveness is going to gradually erode.

 

3) Even if we're home & have done the prep to make ourselves effective with firearms, we're not always 100%.  What if you had a cold & took something over the counter to help you sleep?  What if you recently had knee surgery and need crutches to walk?

 

4) Keeping firearms secure, yet accessable in an emergency isn't the easiest balance in the world for a lot of people.  Most end up having to favor one or the other, depending on their circumstances.  Favoring accessibility makes them more susceptible to theft when you're not home & presents potential safety issues if you have children.  Favoring keeping them secure makes it more likely you won't be able to get to them efficiently in an emergency.

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Wife won't allow it just in case there is a fire emergency and she needs to get out.. she always fumbles with keys and well, that was all she wrote. I pick and choose my battles carefully, and this isn't worth the debate :)

 

put the house key on a key ring like this

 

Stretchy_Spiral_Coil_Clip_Keychain.jpg_2

and sleep with the key around your wrist.  Then you're not fumbling trying to find a key in the dark, it's on your person, on your hand.  It's an option.

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Eh, as important a piece of the puzzle as I'd consider that, it's a last line of defense & has a lot of short comings as a primary strategy.

 

1) Completely ineffective against burglary attempts that occur when no one is home

 

2) Expensive & time consuming to maintain, compared to more passive measures for hardening one's home.  Sure, the firearms themselves aren't too needy, but remaining effective with them requires regular practice & ammunition for said practice.  If we really want to optimize our effectiveness with firearms, formal training is called for, which is additional time & money [well spent, certainly].  Luckily, many of us enjoy that and don't find it too challenging to do that at present.  But, if life suddenly throws a lot at us and we can't make it to the range as we'd like to, our effectiveness is going to gradually erode.

 

3) Even if we're home & have done the prep to make ourselves effective with firearms, we're not always 100%.  What if you had a cold & took something over the counter to help you sleep?  What if you recently had knee surgery and need crutches to walk?

 

4) Keeping firearms secure, yet accessable in an emergency isn't the easiest balance in the world for a lot of people.  Most end up having to favor one or the other, depending on their circumstances.  Favoring accessibility makes them more susceptible to theft when you're not home & presents potential safety issues if you have children.  Favoring keeping them secure makes it more likely you won't be able to get to them efficiently in an emergency.

 

 

We it was more of an answer to the Moat and of razor wire.

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Undercover Video: Home invasions on the rise in Philadelphia

 

http://abclocal.go.com/wpvi/story?section=news/special_reports&id=9321530

 

November 11, 2013 (WPVI) -- Violent home invasions in the Philadelphia area are becoming more common and more vicious.

Now police have shared some of their undercover video exclusively with Action News Investigative Reporter Wendy Saltzman.

Authorities tell Action News the exclusive video came from 3 federal stings where officials with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms caught and arrested what they are calling the "worst of the worst" criminals: armed thieves who, in some cases, are targeting innocent homeowners, students, and anyone who stands in their way.

Here is one conversation heard on hidden video:

Person 1: "Basically, we gonna have another car sitting outside so they can make sure don't nobody come in behind us."
Person 2: "Right, right, right, right, okay, okay, okay"
Person 1: "Ain't nothing else coming in once we go in."
Person 2: "Right, right, right, right."

As part of an ATF undercover sting operation, career criminals are spilling some of the shocking and frightening ways they meticulously plan to rob houses.

From using assault weapons:

Person 1: "That's why I said,' I ain't worrying about the guns, because if they do got guns, first thing they gonna do is shoot.'"

To tying up their victim:

Person 2: "So we're on for tomorrow then."
 Person 1: "Yeah. All we gotta do is make one Home Depot trip. "
 Person 2: "All right, all right. What y'all getting now? Just a.."
 Person 1: "Zip ties."
 

If all else fails, they plan on shooting and even killing the resident.

"Nine of the home invasions we had this year lead to murder," said Philadelphia Police Chief Charles Ramsey.

 "As far as I am concerned, the people who conduct these home invasions are the worst of the worst," said Sam Rabadi with the ATF Philadelphia

6abc received a rare inside look at several joint ATF and Philadelphia Police operations that have resulted in dozens of federal convictions for home invasion.

The look comes as new statistics show the trend of violent home burglaries in Philadelphia is ticking upward. There have been at least 50 more of home invasions in 2013 as there were at the same time in 2012.

 "We've had elderly people that were targeted," Chief Ramsey said. "We've had women that were raped during the course of the home invasion; tied up and pistol whipped."

 The Philadelphia Police Department has 6 undercover officers embedded with the ATF Violent Task Force which is the unit in charge of enforcement efforts to track down and target gun runners and potentially violent offenders like the ones in an undercover video who recently admitted to robbing people for more than 3 decades.

 Person 2: "Yeah. That's, that's what I do. I've been doing this (expletive) so long."
 Person 1: "Right, right."
 Person 2: "The first job was in '81."
 Person 1: "So you got it down to a science."
 Person 2: "I learned that. I got caught (expletive) in Jersey."

The ATF classifies these suspect as "ultra-violent," meaning they have lengthy criminal histories.

The ATF says the 35 offenders that the special task force has arrested in the last year and a half have very lengthy pasts. The robbers in the undercover videos all pled guilty and have been convicted in federal court.

 "They have amongst them over 250 arrests. And these are arrests ranging from murder, to attempted murder, to other armed robberies, and gun possessions," Rabadi said. "These are some seriously bad people."

 The tools of their trade include assault rifles, zip ties, crow bars and masks.

Officials say they move quickly to immediately incapacitate the victims and if need be they will shoot the victims.

For anyone who thinks they are immune from being a victim of these crimes, police warn you are not, as the spiking crime numbers in Philadelphia show.

 "These are people who knows someone's home. This isn't just a burglar who just was startled to find someone at home," Ramsey warns. "These are people that planned it and they know full well someone is home and they come in armed. They come in ready to do whatever they have to do."

So, what can people do? Commissioner Ramsey recommends:
•Do not let anyone in your home who you are not expecting, claiming to be the police or a utility worker.
• Get a home security system and cameras if you can
• Make sure the area outside your home is well lit
• Don't keep large sums of money in your home or on yourself
•Be careful who you let into your home
•Be vigilant about locking your doors and windows, and about your surroundings.

Most importantly, officials say you should trust your instincts and call 911 if you see someone suspicious or someone knocks on your door you don't know.

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Person 1: "That's why I said,' I ain't worrying about the guns, because if they do got guns, first thing they gonna do is shoot.'"

 

First thing who's going to do is shoot?  the home owner??

 

 

also, I love how the newcaster, in her list of things people can do to protect themselves, never once mentioned getting a firearm and training with it.

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Security Door Questions:

 

Approximate cost for a decent security door?  By decent I mean will deter most casual intruders and make them want to move on to an easier target, I don't need to stop a SWAT team.  In a SHTF scenario I'm bugging out to less populated area, not fortifying and defending.

 

Self install or professional install?  If professional install, approx how much per door?

 

Where Does One Purchase?  Home Depot / Lowes has then from $65 - $700 dollars.  Are they decent or look else where?  Recommend some places.

 

Door is only as good as the lock.  I already have the two sided key required for both sides dead bolt.  I realize no lock is going to stop a professional determined thief but what is a good quality lock that won't break the bank. 

 

Lighting - after dark porch lights are left on.  Need to improve short walkway up to front door with lighting, driveway on the side of the house with lighting and side yard.  Neighbors are close so can't be too overpowering.  What do you recommend?

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Person 1: "That's why I said,' I ain't worrying about the guns, because if they do got guns, first thing they gonna do is shoot.'"

 

First thing who's going to do is shoot?  the home owner??.

Yeah I think he means his buddies in the car waiting outside watching for the homeowner to come home will shoot the homeowners.

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