Jump to content
EWC88

Grout or silicone

Recommended Posts

One of our bathrooms shower/tub is going to be getting re-grouted soon and when looking at where the tile wall meets the tub I see there must of been grout there before. My question is what is better for that spot where the tile and tub meet, grout or silicone?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool thanks guys. fishnut I believe what you said about cracking because when I look at it I see spots where grout is gone, and then other spots of it their but cracked up.

 

I see lowes trip coming this Friday to get the job done during weekend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Silicone, and to really do it right, fill the tub with water and stand in it while applying.  That's enough weight for the tub, on most floors, to sag a tiny bit.  Caulk when it's down, then drain, and the caulk line is in compression, and much less likely to pull away from the tub or tile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Silicone, and to really do it right, fill the tub with water and stand in it while applying. That's enough weight for the tub, on most floors, to sag a tiny bit. Caulk when it's down, then drain, and the caulk line is in compression, and much less likely to pull away from the tub or tile.

Keep tub filled while silicone is drying? Thanks for the advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keep tub filled while silicone is drying? Thanks for the advice.

That's how I've done it in the past.   When you step out of the tub, it might (if the floor sagged a small amount) put a little compression on the caulk.   Then when it's dry, drain it and it will compress a little more.   It's subtle--I've never seen it deform the caulk bead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pure Silicone caulk sucks ass to try to smooth out and clean up excess. They do make color match siliconized caulking . I generally grout the joint where they meet, let it dry and then

 caulk on top of that. It adheres better. If its a cast iron tub its not going to sag , steel might a little . You should tool the caulking into the joint.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Phenoseal (spelling?) is what you want. Get it at any of the big box stores. Cut your tip at an angle and apply with a wet rag in your other hand. Keep one of your fingers wet and use it to smooth it out and the rag the clean your finger.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

100% silicone is the best. It will last the longest and will flex the most. But it's hard to work with. If it gets anywhere you don't want it, you'll never completely get rid of it. Guys who do this all the time use silicone.

 

laytex caulk will need to be cut out and replaced every few years but it's very easy to work with because it can be cleaned up with water. To do perfect latex, you can use a wet finger to smooth it and you can clean up excess with a damp sponge.

 

The absolute best caulk is urethane caulk. Lasts forever, flexes more than silicone, will stick to absolutely anything. We've done waterproofing jobs on buildings using cases of urethane caulk. It's amazing. But it's so sticky, so impossible to clean up that it's far worse than silicone if you don't use it all the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely don't use grout at the wall/tub joint its not flexible. The tub and wall can and do move independent from each other. I wouldn't use silicone either because one it will eventually peel off (because that tub and wall have a thin layer of soap on them for sure after years of use, you would have to clean it with serious elbow grease to get it off. and two its messy to work with and get a nice looking bead. I have always used Phenoseal vinyl caulk, or a latex based caulk in that area, in my professional career. Its flexible, mold and mildew resistant. And cleans up easy with a wet sponge when you apply it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...