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Steel Toe vs Composite Toe

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Hey Guys,

 

Need to go onto a construction site in NYC shortly to do a network infrastructure build and want to have comfortable shoes and don't want that added weight of a steel toe shoe. I am guessing that the composite toe shoes are good with OSHA ?

 

I now need to look for a comfortable pair that looks like and comfortable like a sneaker.

 

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I would think they would say osha approved.

I wore steel for years. They suck after awhile. If you drop a safe on them they will chop your toes off. ;)

 

 

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They have to be compliant with ANSI Z41. If you want sneaker comfort in a boot, check out the a Reebok desert boot style with composite toes. I've been wearing them for about two years and they feel like sneakers. http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/mens-reebok-8-composite-toe-stealth-boots-with-side-zip?a=1555012

 

 

This signature is AWESOME!!!

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Redwing has a bunch of good composite and steel toe sneakers. I just picked up a pair of the new CrV boots. Comfortable as hell. Tough like a work boot but fit and wears like a sneaker.

 

http://www.redwingshoes.com/assets/content/redwingshoes/page/crv.html?utm_source=silverpop&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=crv-collection

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Redwing FTW.

 

I don't know of anyone actually checking for compliant boots.

 

^

This

 

I've been in construction management the past 5 years and have never had shoes checked.  We don't necessarily work small projects either; we're doing a few 50+ story towers in jersey city and in NYC.

 

Infact, I've walked on site wearing dress clothes and dress shoes, hardhat vest & glasses.  Nobody bats an eye at the footwear.

 

That being said, if you ever WERE challenged, they would not be looking up its ANSI.  I used to wear 5.11 boots when I actually used to get my hands dirty at work.  Sneaker-like comfort.  Not railroad legal technically without the defined heel, but again, nobody ever challenges footwear.

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I see a lot of the people at my plant wearing reebok steel toe sneakers. Last time the truck came they had a pretty good selection of sneaker like safety shoes. There's way more available these days then what there use to be.

 

http://m.reebokwork.com/Shop/?categories=Mens

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I used to wear mid height 5-6" side zip composite toe boots for the summer due to heat. I just came back to work after a severe ankle sprain with a few torn ligaments. I'll be wearing full height 8-9" boots from now on.

 

Some companies use a steel shank for support, this one uses composite to cut down on weight.

 

http://www.originalswat.com/us_en/product-classic-9-sz-safety-tan.html

 

They're extremely comfortable and light. I usually get 6 months out of a pair, but that's because I'm on my feet or walking most of my shift.

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Red wings are great. I have a pair for summer and a pair for winter.

I've personally never seen anyone questioned about their footwear on a construction site, even though I do wear standard steel toe work boots anyway.

 

Can you share what you wear in the winter? I'm ready to plunge on a real quality pair of boots. I don't need anything special, as close to a standard work boot as possible, just better quality and better protection from cold, plus OSHA/construction compliant.

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I've personally never seen anyone questioned about their footwear on a construction site, even though I do wear standard steel toe work boots anyway.

 

Can you share what you wear in the winter? I'm ready to plunge on a real quality pair of boots. I don't need anything special, as close to a standard work boot as possible, just better quality and better protection from cold, plus OSHA/construction compliant.

I would go with a composite toe 9" boot. They're heavier than a 6" boot, but the support is awesome and it's nice having the extra depth in the snow.

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