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Teky0101

Military Grade Watch?

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Wife got me a gshock when my son was born. I barely take it off, shooting, doing machine work, chemicals, been with me on a few 3 day airsoft ops (and its taken hits there) Im prettyhard on my stuff. Mines a gd400

Damn your watch literally took enemy fire and didn't break? Tier 1 guys should make body armor out of g shock watches!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

:jester

 

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The fact is any decent watch is suitable for wearing while you shoot. Even a cheap watch won't affected by shooting...unless you put a bullet through it. Most watches I've had died because they wound up losing their water integrity not from shock.

 

I've been shooting for nearly 50 years and this thread is the first time I ever heard of "a watch durable enough for shooting".

 

The limitations of watches with thermometers, barometers, and altimeters have been discussed. If you feel you need these at the range you can get a pretty good combination instrument on Amazon. Spend whatever you want $30 on up for a watch to tell time.

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The fact is any decent watch is suitable for wearing while you shoot. 

 

 

This ^^      The requirements spelled out in the first post are best met by any watch, plus a smart phone.

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Remember - Military equipment is made by the lowest bidder so...

Yes made by the lowest bidder but made to a specification. Most milspec stuff far exceed the specs. For example, military parachutes are designed for 90% reliability. It actual use they are much more reliable. More like 99.999%.

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I have both a Suunto AND  Gshock... I got the Gshock because it was a decent watch but more importantly cheap $100.. my wife then gave me a Suunto.. a lot less cheap roughly $1,000.. I was terrified to wear the Suunto.. but I have every day since I got it.. and its still good to go.. the only concern with the Suunto is the bezel can get scratched up.. mine has not.. but the wrong encounter with the wrong object will scratch it because it is metal.. 

 

comparing these two watches is impossible.. the Suunto pairs with my phone.. has a compass.. measures altitude.. has severe weather warning.. gives you GPS directional back to a fixed location if lost..  they are not similar in any way.. 

 

for what its worth I love my Suunto and would get another one if I needed to.. 

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Yes made by the lowest bidder but made to a specification. Most milspec stuff far exceed the specs. For example, military parachutes are designed for 90% reliability. It actual use they are much more reliable. More like 99.999%.

 

 

Someone signed off on 90% reliability as 'good enough' for a parachute?    That's alarming.

 

If it happened, it could only have been signed by someone who knew they would never, ever be in a position to deploy a chute.

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Someone signed off on 90% reliability as 'good enough' for a parachute?    That's alarming.

 

If it happened, it could only have been signed by someone who knew they would never, ever be in a position to deploy a chute.

 

 

 

in the context of measuring reliability on an industry level.. nothing is 100%... no one on this planet will ever claim anything as being such.. so if you consider that... 90% isn't all that bad.. 

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Still wouldn't want to be that poor bastard in the 10 percentile though.

All I can picture is that old cartoon where they pull the rip cord and camping utensils come flying out instead of a chute. Might have been Bugs Bunny or Daffy Duck, I forget. Lol... ;)

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Someone signed off on 90% reliability as 'good enough' for a parachute?    That's alarming.

 

If it happened, it could only have been signed by someone who knew they would never, ever be in a position to deploy a chute.

Nothing is 100% as was said.

 

The parachute example is one they give in Command & General Staff College in the block on writing specifications. To make the parachute 95% reliable would increase the cost maybe 20 times. To consistently meet the 90% the chute has to be more reliable than 90%. You don't see 10% of chutes fail.

 

 

You always have a reserve chute. The odds of both failing are rare. But it does happen.

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Someone signed off on 90% reliability as 'good enough' for a parachute? That's alarming.

 

If it happened, it could only have been signed by someone who knew they would never, ever be in a position to deploy a chute.

If you're not ready to accept some risk, you don't jump out of an airplane.

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A lot of the "special" guys I know wear some flavor of Suunto or Garmin that let's them navigate while operational.

I've never had a Garmin, but I do own a Suunto.  Not that I'm "special", I'm in the engineering department on a submarine.  It's a pretty industrial environment.  My Suunto only lasted about a year and a half of getting banged around.  It still "works", however the wrist band broke in two places, and the bezel got knocked off.  They're built pretty tough compared to cheap watches, but don't hold a candle to G-shocks, of which I own two.

 

That being said, a Suunto watch will stand up to outdoor abuse, as you're not banging it on metal pipes and bulkheads and valves.

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I've never had a Garmin, but I do own a Suunto.  Not that I'm "special", I'm in the engineering department on a submarine.  It's a pretty industrial environment.  My Suunto only lasted about a year and a half of getting banged around.  It still "works", however the wrist band broke in two places, and the bezel got knocked off.  They're built pretty tough compared to cheap watches, but don't hold a candle to G-shocks, of which I own two.

 

That being said, a Suunto watch will stand up to outdoor abuse, as you're not banging it on metal pipes and bulkheads and valves.

 

 

just curious which Suunto.. I think some of them take damage worse than others.. I work in network operations and am always in and out of server cabinets... running cables.. etc.. and have not had any issues.. 

 

one distinct advantage of the Suunto I forgot to mention.. the Suunto is a million times more comfortable to wear.. like the comparison is not even close.. 

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To be honest, I don't remember the model. I have tried looking it up, with no success. It was a lower ens model. No GPS. Other than standard digital watch features, it just had an altimeter and barometer.

 

All that aside, I loved the watch. Suunto makes great watches, and I can only imagine how nice their better watches are.

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Thank you everyone for the great information. I ended up getting the Casio GSHOCK Rangeman in black for Christmas. So far I am really enjoying the watch and it seems like a great value for a little over $200 dollars. I realize that this model has been out for several years and they are pushing the Mudmaster watches but in my eyes the Rangeman has some better features such as being solar powered. Now all I need to do is learn how to operate all of the features. Thank you again for the advice!

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There and pros and cons to both styles. Digital watches can cram a lot of features into the design since they use a screen to display the information. Analog watches are great since they have a high range of visibility and can truly be pieces of artwork.

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^^^^

This! I have no use for plastic watches or quartz. A watch without a hairspring is a toy.

One need not spend a lot to get a real watch. It's already been mentioned that Seiko watches are built like tanks and start at under $200, there are also many others in that category. I've seen a nice Glycine military style watch on massdrop recently.

I'm still looking for an actual USGI Hamilton from the Vietnam era.

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^^^^

This! I have no use for plastic watches or quartz. A watch without a hairspring is a toy.

One need not spend a lot to get a real watch. It's already been mentioned that Seiko watches are built like tanks and start at under $200, there are also many others in that category. I've seen a nice Glycine military style watch on massdrop recently.

I'm still looking for an actual USGI Hamilton from the Vietnam era.

This is the same purple one I've posted around before. It cost me way more then $200 to get it sent from Japan(market exclusive)

 

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fdde02f9e67131345fdf552bf2715a82.jpg

 

This is generally what's on my person at all times

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LOL, I was actually replying to Teky0101, but I was in and out of coverage and you posted before me. I'm familiar with foreign market seikos, I paid close to 400 for my OM about a year before they became available here. Their high end stuff can go into 5 figures, but I'll stick by my statement that they START under $200.

 

BTW, looks blue to me :p

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LOL, I was actually replying to Teky0101, but I was in and out of coverage and you posted before me. I'm familiar with foreign market seikos, I paid close to 400 for my OM about a year before they became available here. Their high end stuff can go into 5 figures, but I'll stick by my statement that they START under $200.

 

BTW, looks blue to me :p

ce555ec5c4f73dba57f1ccfc330a748a.jpg

I'd say more like periwinkle.

 

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