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Teky0101

Looking for Employment

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Hello Everyone,

Over the past two years I worked as the Web Manager for a sporting goods store in the South Jersey area which specialized in firearms, firearms accessories, bows and archery equipment. The company recently went out of business in mid October and since this time I have been looking for new employment opportunities. My role as Web Manager included created an e-commerce website, updating the company website, creating online advertisements, facilitating the transfer and compliance of a new point of sale system and the setup of an online booking system used for booking defensive training classes. I was wondering if anyone knows of any companies within the South Jersey area which specialize in firearms, tactical gear, defensive training and/or defensive training products? If so, could you please provide the name of the business and/or contact information? I would like to send them a correspondence to see if they are currently offering any employment opportunities. I really need to obtain employment soon since my unemployment will be running out next month! Any help would be greatly appreciated!   

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If that's what you specialize in you should do very well. Ever see the horrendous url addresses some of these shops claim are websites?

 

You should probably do this not as an employee but as an independent contractor. Steps:

 

1. Get off your ass. Don't panic but start tomorrow. 

 

2. Write a resume including all relevant experience. I'll edit it for you if you PM me. Get a simple, cheap business card from Staples. "Joe Grinder, Web Consultant" "Specializing in Firearms and Sporting Goods" Address, web address, phone number. No facebook, twitter, or Grinder ID. Keep it simple. 

 

3. Upload the best work you've done to a free website you create, which potential customers can access easily. Also create a one-page flier.

 

4. Get a directory of every sports shop within 50 miles of you. You can probably find these online or in any decent university library

 

5. Visit them in person, beginning when the earliest convenient one opens. If the owner is not in leave your resume, business card, and ask when he'll be in. Return at that time.

 

6. Be prepared when you visit them. Go to their website and jot down 2-3 things they could improve. If they don't have one all the better.

 

7. Look into e-commerce "solutions" you can implement easily. For example my favorite shop has a very small inventory but can find almost everything.

 

8. Look around and see what people are charging for services like yours. I'd think $40 an hour is the lowest.

 

9. Market yourself based on one-time services plus maintenance so you're always busy.

 

10. Did I mention? Get off your f-ing ass. Don't panic but start tomorrow.

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If you can intronet sell a widget, you can sell a waggle. I'd branch out to powersports, auto, tooling. Pool supply. Any industry tat sells pieces and parts.

Don't limit your peripheral with a narrow focus.

Even mom and pop hardware, furniture, wood stove..

Welding supply. These groups want to sell intronet, they are not tooled, nor have the experience.

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If that's what you specialize in you should do very well. Ever see the horrendous url addresses some of these shops claim are websites?

 

You should probably do this not as an employee but as an independent contractor. Steps:

 

1. Get off your ass. Don't panic but start tomorrow. 

 

2. Write a resume including all relevant experience. I'll edit it for you if you PM me. Get a simple, cheap business card from Staples. "Joe Grinder, Web Consultant" "Specializing in Firearms and Sporting Goods" Address, web address, phone number. No facebook, twitter, or Grinder ID. Keep it simple. 

 

3. Upload the best work you've done to a free website you create, which potential customers can access easily. Also create a one-page flier.

 

4. Get a directory of every sports shop within 50 miles of you. You can probably find these online or in any decent university library

 

5. Visit them in person, beginning when the earliest convenient one opens. If the owner is not in leave your resume, business card, and ask when he'll be in. Return at that time.

 

6. Be prepared when you visit them. Go to their website and jot down 2-3 things they could improve. If they don't have one all the better.

 

7. Look into e-commerce "solutions" you can implement easily. For example my favorite shop has a very small inventory but can find almost everything.

 

8. Look around and see what people are charging for services like yours. I'd think $40 an hour is the lowest.

 

9. Market yourself based on one-time services plus maintenance so you're always busy.

 

10. Did I mention? Get off your f-ing ass. Don't panic but start tomorrow.

 

Newtonian provided you with very solid advice.  I would also recommend that you also look into website design for other types of businesses once you get established.

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If you can intronet sell a widget, you can sell a waggle. I'd branch out to powersports, auto, tooling. Pool supply. Any industry tat sells pieces and parts.

Don't limit your peripheral with a narrow focus.

Even mom and pop hardware, furniture, wood stove..

Welding supply. These groups want to sell intronet, they are not tooled, nor have the experience.

Take it from the voice of experience in the "creative" trades for nearly 30 years: Start simple, with what you already do well. You can investigate buying into Zeke's multi-level butt plug franchise after you're making enough to stay afloat in your day job.

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Take it from the voice of experience in the "creative" trades for nearly 30 years: Start simple, with what you already do well. You can investigate buying into Zeke's multi-level butt plug franchise after you're making enough to stay afloat in your day job.

Hmmn,

Teky look into the mom and pop butt plug sellers as well.

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If that's what you specialize in you should do very well. Ever see the horrendous url addresses some of these shops claim are websites?

 

You should probably do this not as an employee but as an independent contractor. Steps:

 

1. Get off your ass. Don't panic but start tomorrow. 

 

2. Write a resume including all relevant experience. I'll edit it for you if you PM me. Get a simple, cheap business card from Staples. "Joe Grinder, Web Consultant" "Specializing in Firearms and Sporting Goods" Address, web address, phone number. No facebook, twitter, or Grinder ID. Keep it simple. 

 

3. Upload the best work you've done to a free website you create, which potential customers can access easily. Also create a one-page flier.

 

4. Get a directory of every sports shop within 50 miles of you. You can probably find these online or in any decent university library

 

5. Visit them in person, beginning when the earliest convenient one opens. If the owner is not in leave your resume, business card, and ask when he'll be in. Return at that time.

 

6. Be prepared when you visit them. Go to their website and jot down 2-3 things they could improve. If they don't have one all the better.

 

7. Look into e-commerce "solutions" you can implement easily. For example my favorite shop has a very small inventory but can find almost everything.

 

8. Look around and see what people are charging for services like yours. I'd think $40 an hour is the lowest.

 

9. Market yourself based on one-time services plus maintenance so you're always busy.

 

10. Did I mention? Get off your f-ing ass. Don't panic but start tomorrow.

 

Great advice! I have been sending out my newly created resume along with a letter of my work highlights to a lot of gun shops and stores in the area but most either do not respond or are not looking for work. I worked a lot of freelance in the past but its hard to maintain a steady income but certainly anything at the moment would help. Perhaps it might be best to visit these companies in person to see if I can get anywhere. However, I really need something that will pay well. My last position paid a very low wage and its nearly impossible to live on. Thank you again for the advice.

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If you can intronet sell a widget, you can sell a waggle. I'd branch out to powersports, auto, tooling. Pool supply. Any industry tat sells pieces and parts.

Don't limit your peripheral with a narrow focus.

Even mom and pop hardware, furniture, wood stove..

Welding supply. These groups want to sell intronet, they are not tooled, nor have the experience.

 

Great idea. I have actually been applying to a number of companies in the area with a number of industries. Good idea to check out the tool industry. Lots of those businesses should have an e-commerce presence. 

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Great advice! I have been sending out my newly created resume along with a letter of my work highlights to a lot of gun shops and stores in the area but most either do not respond or are not looking for work. I worked a lot of freelance in the past but its hard to maintain a steady income but certainly anything at the moment would help. Perhaps it might be best to visit these companies in person to see if I can get anywhere. However, I really need something that will pay well. My last position paid a very low wage and its nearly impossible to live on. Thank you again for the advice.

Don't give up. Take a systematic, slow-go approach to this. As a grouchy old guinea I must add that you should have started six months ago but forget that.

 

There's probably 100 shops within a 75 mile drive from you. You have the time. Remember you will be able to do a lot of this work remotely (as I do) so if you have a client in Wayne and another in Cape May it makes no difference. 

 

Sending letters asking for work got me my first freelance gig 30 years ago (I still work for them). Unfortunately that no longer works. The job boards also suck unless you're in one of the sainted professions. They're basically reverse auctions.

 

Personal contact is the key. Show up neatly dressed with some sort of manly bling -- a camo fleece, molon labe hat, but don't overdo it. Discuss HIS problem (shitty website) not yours (poor as shit on the balls of your ass). Tell him one extra sale will pay for the upgrade. 

 

And be prepared for rejection. Gun shop owners are mostly good guys. I've actually only known one asshole and he was probably just having a bad day.

 

Make a plan and write it down, then follow it. 

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Newtonian thank you for the advice. I am certainly not giving up and I did start applying a while ago just have not had much luck. Also shortly after the company I was working for closed my dad died very suddenly after a heart surgery so everything has been a mess and is now starting to get back to normal considering the circumstances.  Having done a lot of freelance work and I totally realize that networking is key. Do you perhaps know of any quality gun shops in the South Jersey area? Thank you for your advice!

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TEky0101...

 

Newtonian gave you some solid advise.  follow it.   having been a recruiter for the so called "sainted professions" its best to stay in your wheel house as you build you business.  Depending on your resources, having a mock copy of your proposed enhancements to show may help you gain the trust of some small business owners.   its just a thought, but it may help peek an interest level.

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TEky0101...

 

Newtonian gave you some solid advise. follow it. having been a recruiter for the so called "sainted professions" its best to stay in your wheel house as you build you business. Depending on your resources, having a mock copy of your proposed enhancements to show may help you gain the trust of some small business owners. its just a thought, but it may help peek an interest level.

Care to share what the sainted professions are?

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