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charleslee

House beside Superfund???

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Daughter & son-in-law are most likely going to be putting in an offer on the above, Lakehurst Rd. I think it is. 3 1/2 acres. Well water. Decent price but I just found out about the Superfund

from a fellow at the RC Club located on the SF site. He advised they should do their research. Wouldn't drink the water regardless. I spoke to a builder who suggested they have a Perk test done, testing the ground, to find out about sinkage. 2K. They ain't gonna go for that, having all $ tied up in a down payment, etc. Besides, son-in-law is certain the house wouldn't be approved, inspection-passed, etc. if unsafe & basement would be flooded if on water. I don't know??? Superfund ended way back but who the hell knows? Leeching! There's politics. Pay-offs. Look at all the cancer rates by landfills various places. Just scares me. Grandkids potentially living there. Paranoid??? Thoughts much appreciated.

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You could not pay me to move into a house next to a dirty site. Certain chemical pollution can last forever unless remediated.

 

With Trump's plans to defund the EPA, hence defunding cleanups of superfund sites, I would urge your kin to run away fast.

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You could not pay me to move into a house next to a dirty site. Certain chemical pollution can last forever unless remediated.

 

With Trump's plans to defund the EPA, hence defunding cleanups of superfund sites, I would urge your kin to run away fast.

I would not buy that house even with your money. Even if everything tested ok today in the future they might never be able to sell it. Run don't walk away from this.
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You want your grandkids to grow up on the next love canal? I wouldn't take that property if it were free.

 

There is no doubt they should run away as fast as possible.  It's probably attractively priced but that's for a reason.  If they want to sell it at some point in the future it may be a turn off to future buyers that they've grown tails or additional limbs.  

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If it was a Superfund site, there is an engineering firm that has been hired to oversee the safety of the area around the site.  There are several firms that manage these sites.  They are required to do monthly, quarterly, and other timely tests on all sorts of things to make sure there is no leaching into surrounding areas.  Once your daughter moves in, they'll start getting regular updates from whoever this is - assuming it really is a site that's been identified as contaminated.  Contact the DEP.  They can tell you who to get in touch with to get whatever data they have on public health for that specific site.

 

There are so many sites in NJ that are contaminated with something that nobody has identified yet.  Just because this 1 out of 1000 sites made the list doesn't mean other places are safer.  I've been on work sites where test boring to check soil conditions found the 75 year old neighborhood dump under several inches of topsoil.   Everybody used to throw their garbage in a low spot in the woods, dump the old motor oil in a hole in the back yard, and burn the trash and spread the ashes on the garden.

 

I'd need to know more information before I made my decision.

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Check the plume location on Geoweb. If it is within 100 feet you need indoor air testing done. That is a regulation and also a safe bet.

 

Check the project status on DataMiner. Does it have an Entire Site RAO or NFA? If so, there is probably not much to worry about.

 

Go to OPRA and request a file review on the case. Go to Trenton and look at the maps over time to see if the plume is moving.

 

Call the NJDEP Case manager or LSRP and ask if there is control on the site. They will not steer you wrong. You will find their names and numbers in Dataminer.

 

If it is uncontrolled, a recent addition to the NPL, then there is cause for concern.

 

Water is the property of the State. If the groundwater contamination footprint included this property they would have closed your well and paid to provide your lot with water service. Threatened receptors (such as wells) are the priority of any investigation. Ask NJDEP is they have sampled the well and taken any indoor air samples. If they have not, there is probably a good reason for it. Such as the contam is far from you and under control or moving in the other direction. If the case is recent, that's when there is some uncertainty.

 

I know Superfund is federal. Sometimes people assume a site is Superfund when it is not. Either way, they coordinate with NJDEP as a courtesy and they can steer you to the right place to get advice and info. NJDEP is a lot easier to deal with, and they prioritize public notification and communication. There are no secrets in these projects, everything is public info whether good or bad.

 

We only have about 150 Superfund sites in Jersey. That being said, we have thousands of known contaminated sites. It is almost certain there are one or more near you, today, and they pose more of a likely threat than a Superfund site. While you are Geoweb, type in your own address, turn on all sites in the layers (KCSL/NJEMS/etc.), and see what happens. Then come back and ask if you should be living where you live.

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You know what? PM me the address and I'll take a look at it and call the LSRP. There may not be an LSTP since it is Superfund but I can call NJDEP. That will rule out most issues. If they've already decided not to get it then don't bother me with it. I'll send you snap shots of the maps, project history, and a brief description of what it all means.

 

There should be a 2x3' sign at the entrance to the site with the site name and contact information for public outreach. If you get any of that information it will help me since I want to make sure I find the right site. But I may be OK without it.

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While mipafox is probably correct about the technical analysis about the site this is more than a matter of fact. Down the road it could be hard to sell just because the potential pool of buyers will be deminished due to them also having concerns and stopping the investigation without going through a detailed search.

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While mipafox is probably correct about the technical analysis about the site this is more than a matter of fact. Down the road it could be hard to sell just because the potential pool of buyers will be deminished due to them also having concerns and stopping the investigation without going through a detailed search.

Of course. That's why you give the buyer the stuff yourself if it comes up. there is always some risk in resale value. But the truth is they are required to provide clean water, resolve any vapor abatement issues, and remediate any soil contamination. so from an environmental and health standpoint there is no liability. HOWEVER - in the extremely unlikely event that this is a new site, it can take years to investigate and there may be unknowns.

 

Now, type YOUR address into Geoweb, find out what is nearby, and decide if your property value is impact. My bet is you will be surprised.

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302w knows more about me than you do, to say the least. I would appreciate him keeping it generally private, as he is, but I also appreciate his generic support :)

 

I can do in 15 minutes what will take you 3 hrs to clunk through, and they will answer my questions when I call, so it is sort of a forum member courtesy. No, I will not go to Trenton for a file review. That would cost you money. But I can come up with a 90% answer from the comfort of my office.

 

There is risk in life. As I have pointed out, many of you are about to use Geoweb and figure out you live near contaminated sites. People think contamination is magic. "Oh, doctors say eat this food, next year they say that food will kill you, so they have no idea what is going on! We're all going to die!" It's not magic. True, there are no certainties. Did you do GPR and Total Earth Mag on your property before you bought it or might there be leaking underground storage tanks at your house that nobody knows about? YOU are responsible for sources that are actually on your property, and it is up to you to go after somebody long gone to try to get that cost back. Anybody here buy some farm land? The orchards that don;t even show up in historic aerial photos are covered in arsenic and lead, your fields are covered in pesticides that have made illegal and priority contaminants under the NJDEP Soil Remediation Standards, you have fuel tanks buried that have leaked and you never knew about, and over the years the farmers probably poured 10 gallons of perc into the former septic system that you don't even know exist. And, you probably have asbestos.

 

Ever bother to check for what might be in your kingdom? No, you didn't. Just like you didn't check what was around it. Does life go on? In most cases it seems to.

 

It's a little ironic, but one of the advantages of living next to a Know Contaminated Site is that if you had any substantial contamination they probably already figured it out for you! Whereas everyone else in this thread has no idea what might be under their feet on their own land.

 

But don't give me this Love Canal or Valley of the Drums crap. This isn't the 70s. Both EPA and NJDEP regulations are very strict now, largely too strict. There are no secrets and nothing is ignored. As long as the investigation is complete (and not new), things have probably been settled.

 

If you are afraid of living near controlled contamination, might I suggest the Moon? :) Just watch for constant radiation exposure up there.

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Run away from that deal if they value their health. Even if you do not drink the water when you shower you inhale it.

What makes you think their water is contaminated? Magic 8 Ball or Quiga board?

 

Have you typed your address into Geoweb yet and turned on all site layers? I wonder if the water is good where YOU live.

 

People running around with their hair on fire when they have no idea what may or may not be going on. And for some reason nobody is concerned about the contaminated sites surrounding their own homes. And the children :) Don't check Geoweb for me, check if for your children :D

 

In the layers, turn on all sites (KCSL/NJEMS/etc), turn on CEAs under groundwater, turn on historic fill, and turn on deed notices.

 

Enjoy :D

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The only for-sure impact this will have on the home is resale value. It will be harder to sell in the future, it will get a lower price, it will take longer to sell, maybe over a year to find the right buyer. The majority of home buyers will see the word superfund and walk away, about 98%. As long as they know that home is not an investment, and that the odds are they will lose money when they sell it. If they want to live there for 50 years and run it into the ground, then go for it!

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The only for-sure impact this will have on the home is resale value. It will be harder to sell in the future, it will get a lower price, it will take longer to sell, maybe over a year to find the right buyer. The majority of home buyers will see the word superfund and walk away, about 98%. As long as they know that home is not an investment, and that the odds are they will lose money when they sell it. If they want to live there for 50 years and run it into the ground, then go for it!

Another analogy would be like trying to sell an exotic car that has been in an accident.

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A

 

302w knows more about me than you do, to say the least. I would appreciate him keeping it generally private, as he is, but I also appreciate his generic support :)

I can do in 15 minutes what will take you 3 hrs to clunk through, and they will answer my questions when I call, so it is sort of a forum member courtesy. No, I will not go to Trenton for a file review. That would cost you money. But I can come up with a 90% answer from the comfort of my office.

There is risk in life. As I have pointed out, many of you are about to use Geoweb and figure out you live near contaminated sites. People think contamination is magic. "Oh, doctors say eat this food, next year they say that food will kill you, so they have no idea what is going on! We're all going to die!" It's not magic. True, there are no certainties. Did you do GPR and Total Earth Mag on your property before you bought it or might there be leaking underground storage tanks at your house that nobody knows about? YOU are responsible for sources that are actually on your property, and it is up to you to go after somebody long gone to try to get that cost back. Anybody here buy some farm land? The orchards that don;t even show up in historic aerial photos are covered in arsenic and lead, your fields are covered in pesticides that have made illegal and priority contaminants under the NJDEP Soil Remediation Standards, you have fuel tanks buried that have leaked and you never knew about, and over the years the farmers probably poured 10 gallons of perc into the former septic system that you don't even know exist. And, you probably have asbestos.

Ever bother to check for what might be in your kingdom? No, you didn't. Just like you didn't check what was around it. Does life go on? In most cases it seems to.

It's a little ironic, but one of the advantages of living next to a Know Contaminated Site is that if you had any substantial contamination they probably already figured it out for you! Whereas everyone else in this thread has no idea what might be under their feet on their own land.

But don't give me this Love Canal or Valley of the Drums crap. This isn't the 70s. Both EPA and NJDEP regulations are very strict now, largely too strict. There are no secrets and nothing is ignored. As long as the investigation is complete (and not new), things have probably been settled.

If you are afraid of living near controlled contamination, might I suggest the Moon? :) Just watch for constant radiation exposure up there. 

Ahhh i love people who approach things with common sense and knowledge ! The mass hysteria over this topic lol omg run run run run.. People unarmed with any factual information just spewing what they think they might know that they heard from billy bobs cousin the pig farmer,. Thank you for bringing common sense ,knowledge and facts to the subject.. I see no reason to add any other information

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My track car has been totaled at least twice. I got it cheap because I knew it had been hit and had some minor issues and if I were to sell it I'd disclose this info (the title doesn't reflect the history and it doesn't show up on Carfax either).

Likewise with real estate, certain things may impact resale value but they will have the same impact on your purchase price, so the idea that it is not a sound investment is absurd. I live close enough to a highway to get a little road noise on the deck. The highway was there when I bought the house and it will be there when I sell it too. Same would be true of a house near high tension lines, a pipeline, train tracks, etc. The argument could be made that known contamination can be remediated leading to an increase in value. The worst scenario would be to buy where there is no contamination and have it be discovered later.

I take the geoweb info with a grain of salt, plenty of things don't show up (like the fill my neighborhood is built on).

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The site in question is likely the old Legler landfill, which was a town dump for  a few years until development started happening and people complained about bad water. It's all well and septic over there. Look it up, IIRC it was cleaned up/contained and the wells were probably made to go deeper.  But who knows what the Mafia dumped there. Theres two asphalt plants that are probably more hazardous, not too far away. Not sure if its  been worked on for awhile. There was a suggestion to re-open it for composting purposes--leaves, tree pieces, grass clippings etc. a few years ago, but the people around there torpedoed it.

 

Jackson will be controlled by the Orthodox Jews in the next 3 years anyway, I would suggest they look further out. Plumsted has some comparable areas without the SF sites (except where 537 & 539 meet)

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