TRM9999

Decent scope for my 10/22 help

15 posts in this topic

Hi. 
Since its a basic priced 10/22  rifle I didn't want to spend too much on a scope for it, but after 10 minutes I regretted the cheap tube I bought. So later I got a slightly better but still cheap Bushnell and ready to toss it and the cheap mountings out the window.

What is a good price range and scope selection for basic plinking/fun shooting up to 100 yards?

I had gotten a Nikon P-223 for my AR and that was fine (and a special on the mounts made that deal). This level may be good.
 

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46 minutes ago, Krdshrk said:

A 3-9x40 scope should be more than enough.  What cheap bushnell did you get?

I got the off the shelf 1" tube with no power adjustments. $40-50 type.  Did fine for fooling around at 25 yards. Even on the 50 but the eye strain and eye relief is a pain.  That 3x9 is about what I have on the AR and its good. 

thanks

 

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My experience is that a .22 is great at 50-75 yds.  At 100 yds, you're reaching the guns' limits.  I shoot .22's a lot but I really prefer something else at 100yds.  If you're shooting tight groups at 50yds but not having as much success at 100yds, maybe the scope isn't the limiting factor, maybe the rifle is. 

That said, A $50 Bushnell scope is probably the lower end of what's appropriate for a .22.  I definitely wouldn't spend more than $100.  I've got a 3-9x40 on my goto .22 and I probably spent $50-$60 on the scope.  I'm satisfied that the scope is as accurate as the rifle is.

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All these suggestions and hints are appreciated.

I may try the 100 yards, but I'll base the scope decision on 50 yards. As you get older the eyes need better optics. 
Maybe I'll just take the P223 scope off the AR and try that for a bit to see how much I notice the difference. 

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Same..  i have a 3-9x nikon rimfire scope on mine.  Initially bought it for my 15-22, but decided to go the RDS route for that and put the nikon on the 10/22 i was upgrading.  Works perfectly.  100 yards is easily attainable, but once you go out past that, it becomes a guessing game..  (I have actually hit steel at 200 yards, but the frequency of that is incredibly small).  50-100 yards, you should be able to hit all day with a 10/22 and a nikon scope.  I have mine sighted in for 50 yds but with the BDC on the nikon, 100 is no problem. 

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I found out the rail they give you with the 10/22 isn't really a full sized picatinny rail. I can slide the scope mount over it but the tightening screw is too big for the slots on the rail. Will have to get something better so I used the cheap wedge mounts temporary as I'm just trying it out. 

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For shooting 100 yards with your 22lr I would suggest Nikon's PROSTAFF 3-9x40 Rimfire BDC 150. It lets you dial in your rifle scope and ammo using Nikon's Spot On Program to get excellent downrange accuracy. This scope is very similar to your P-223 scope except the rimfire is set for 1/4 inch adjustments at 50 yards and not 100 like your P-223. One of my favorite features of the PROSTAFF scopes besides outstanding light gathering is the fast focus eyepiece for an extra clear picture. Here's a pic of Spot On number's I ran for a guy looking for a scope for 22lr to shoot subsonic ammo. Drop me a note with any questions.

 hope it expands enough to see all the data you can get from this program. YOu can even change the power setting which in turn changes the BDC yardages. I

 

Screen Shot 2017-08-09 at 11.40.09 AM.png

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Nikon's BDC scopes all allow you to utilize Spot On to dial in your rifle,scope ad ammo. Pretty cool program but like any progrma the results are only as good as the data you enter. I always chronograph my loads and measure scope height to make sure my down range accuracy will be as good as I can get it. The only unknown is how well I will shoot that day. 

 

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