High Exposure

Never Forget. Never Forgive. 9/11/01

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I will never forgive, or forget.  Period.  To those who lost friends, loved ones, on this day or after due to this heinous act, this day of remembrance will never heal the feelings or sufferings you have endured.  Please be aware we the people of the USA, take this time to let you know they will never be forgotten and their memory is instilled in our minds and hearts. God be with you. 

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Not only have American's forgave.... Plenty forgot.... Plenty have rewritten history....

Ask someone 18yo who attacked us and why.....

You most likely wont like the answer they have been programmed with.

 

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It's not about forgiving the people who did what they did.

It's not about forgiving the people who wish to do harm in the future.

It's about forgiving for your own sake.

Don't forget what has been done. 

Don't turn a blind eye to people who look to harm.

But let go of the hate.

"Holding onto hate is like drinking poison, and expecting the other person to die."

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Hate is a good thing when it's used correctly.  I also hate rapists, child molesters, pedophiles, murderers, terrorists, and there are probably more.

The hate makes me know who they are and what they can do.  

 

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My Christian faith tells me I should forgive everyone, even those who hate me. It is difficult, unnatural,  but necessary.  Just as Jesus forgave those who killed him, Paul was forgiven by the Lord even after he murdered Christians, Dietrich Bohnhoffer forgave the Nazis who tortured and killed him (although he also helped in a few failed plots to assassinate Hitler).  Darrell Scott (whose daughter was killed in Columbine) forgave his daughter's killers. 

True Christianity is a religion of love, forgiveness and reconciliation. Hate the evil, but forgive the misguided perpetrators.

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19 minutes ago, High Exposure said:

I leave forgiveness for people that perpetrate acts like that to the Lord. My Heart just isn't strong enough.

 

And to be clear - I don't hate Muslims or Islam. 

I hate fucking terrorists.

^^^ + 10000000000000

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Will never forget that day.  By miracle, my parents got stuck in really bad GWB traffic that morning when they were supposed to be in one of the top floors of the WTC for a meeting.  They watched it happen right in front of their eyes along with a dozen other family members that were blocks away.  My family has never been so grateful for traffic.  And those people who leapt to their death... yeah... lots of people I know saw that first hand too.

 

Can't help but also think about all the shady shit that went on before and after. 

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I have a visceral reaction of Anger and hate whenever I think about it, see the video, walk by the memorial or freedom tower. That's just my natural reaction and I can't imagine that ever changing, but I believe I can also make the conscious choice to love and forgive. And, as Alex said, the hate and anger really doesn't do me any good.

I remember, many years ago, hearing Darrell Scott speaking about losing his daughter Rachel to the Columbine killers. I was amazed at his ability to love and forgive. I can't even begin to understand his loss, yet he was able to forgive, by God's grace and power.

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14 hours ago, AlexTheSane said:

It's not about forgiving the people who did what they did.

It's not about forgiving the people who wish to do harm in the future.

It's about forgiving for your own sake.

Don't forget what has been done. 

Don't turn a blind eye to people who look to harm.

But let go of the hate.

"Holding onto hate is like drinking poison, and expecting the other person to die."

Umm..  I dont have to forgive for my own sake.  Not forgiving does not mean letting it affect you.

I would understand forgiving except for the fact we have been at war with them since 9/11.  I really cant understand anyone who would forgive while they are still trying to kill you.

Why is hate a bad thing?   Should a women not hate her rapist? Should i not hate someone who wants me dead?

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, High Exposure said:

I leave forgiveness for people that perpetrate acts like that to the Lord. My Heart just isn't strong enough.

 

And to be clear - I don't hate Muslims or Islam. 

I hate fucking terrorists.

You cant hate Terrorists without hating all Muslims. At least thats what the MSM tells us.

The fact you cant mention terrorists and their connection to Islam is an issue.  Any sane person can have the conversation and connect the dots... that being said of course not all Muslims are terrorists but you cant ignore the connections regardless if its a perversion of it.

 

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9 hours ago, leahcim said:

Darrell Scott speaking about losing his daughter Rachel to the Columbine killers. I was amazed at his ability to love and forgive. I can't even begin to understand his loss, yet he was able to forgive, by God's grace and power.

I get it... But the main difference is the killers from Columbine are not still gunning for his loved ones.   If his daughters killers were free and still shooting up schools i bet he would feel differently.

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Did we a'll forget the celebrating in the streets around this area and in the middle East when the buildings came down?  How soon we forget.  

Their "religion" is racist, homophobic, sexist, allows rape of women and children, allows murder, bigotry, slavery, and thievery.

I'll pass 

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Did we a'll forget the celebrating in the streets around this area and in the middle East when the buildings came down?  How soon we forget.  
Their "religion" is racist, homophobic, sexist, allows rape of women and children, allows murder, bigotry, slavery, and thievery.
I'll pass 


And let's not forget those poor goats (face palm)
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2 hours ago, Ray Ray said:

Did we a'll forget the celebrating in the streets around this area and in the middle East when the buildings came down?  How soon we forget.  

Their "religion" is racist, homophobic, sexist, allows rape of women and children, allows murder, bigotry, slavery, and thievery.

I'll pass 

I remember.. as well as celebrations by some in on the streets of NY and NJ.   Funny how that all got washed out and no longer exists without  digging deep.

 

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I can't forget, either.  I was there.

I was in my office on Greenwich St. in TriBeCa when the planes hit. Still, somewhat "in denial,"  I called a fellow employee (and internal client) of mine working at 7 WTC (where we had rented space).  To my surprise, he answered! All the alarms going off in the background were horrific. He stayed on he phone for about 20 seconds and then had to go.  Thankfully, he got out, as did everyone we had at 7WTC.  Only 4 of our employees were casualties (4 people making sales calls in 1 & 2 WTC).

Everyone evacuated my building and were just milling around on the ground, trying to account for co-workers, etc.  We then heard this collective SCREAM from across the street.  We all stepped into Greenwich St. just in time to witness the South Tower collapse right in front of us. Shortly thereafter, all those below a certain rank (which I was) were told to leave the area and head North. I found refuge at a cousin's apt. in Chelsea, and for the night in her parents' apartment nearby.  This, because mass transit was completely shut down.  I got home OK the next morning. We were not allowed back into TriBeCa for 3 weeks and, when we were allowed back, we had to show ID and proof of employment to LE that was maintaining a perimeter on Canal St. for another 3-4 weeks thereafter. The smell lingered on for months (i.e. burnt electrical wires and asbestos).  Horrific.

For me, it's not a question of "forgiveness."  It's about holding people "accountable" for their actions, and "never forgetting.." i.e. never letting one's guard down against those that might do the same to us.  Sure,  I can forgive, but one still must accept the consequences of their actions. I could forgive a BG that murders a family member of mine, but I will ensure they still "ride the needle." And we must always be "on guard" to prevent any future attacks. I think, sometimes, people grow complacent after a long time has passed since the last "incident."   Never grow complacent. Always stay "on guard."

Never forget.

 

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5 hours ago, Ray Ray said:

Did we a'll forget the celebrating in the streets around this area and in the middle East when the buildings came down?  How soon we forget.  

 

 

2 hours ago, remixer said:

I remember.. as well as celebrations by some in on the streets of NY and NJ.   Funny how that all got washed out and no longer exists without  digging deep.

 

sadly alot of people have forgotten this. 

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I'm awed by people who can forgive, for instance, someone who murdered a loved one. I think it's a special kind of grace to be able to do that.

But I think several others on here have hit the nail on the head... in that you don't forgive while you're still under threat. I think that's the big difference in this situation. The threat, in this case - radical Islamic terrorists - continue to plot, continue to wage attacks, and continue to kill innocent people around the globe. So, the threat is still very much active and unfolding. To forgive under those unique circumstances strikes me not as magnanimous, but instead, just as letting one's guard down. 

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