Texanmile

Emergency Bug Out

73 posts in this topic

6 hours ago, Scorpio64 said:

Go bags are fun to put together.  It's amazing how many essential items one needs for SHTF.

This is pretty much why I went to the bug-in model instead.  As mentioned before, just too much shit to have to manage, and all you're doing is putting yourself into a resource scarce and high competition environment, where civil norms are at or beyond their breaking point.  The idea of being stuck someplace in some make shift refugee type camp trying to fight with 10,000+ people for a fucking bottle of water, does not appeal to me.

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4 hours ago, sota said:

I have a well established average load of about 2000W in the house (that's over an entire year period, mind you, so it covers all usage.) 
as mentioned my fuel consumption is 5 gallons of gas over a 16.5hr period (which would suggest a 1666W load)
i'm definitely running in the sweet spot on my genset.
one of the things I've done in the past is study the load on each circuit, and try to balance the loading on each half of the phase.

These are good points. My suggestion is that people really need to have a plan on what's important to keep powered up versus what's a luxury to have running. Knowing loads of the necessary items that have to stay running is key. Making adjustments now is also important, like changing to LED bulbs and knowing what to unplug on circuits that are normally powered up to save on overall power usage.

Plus, refriges don't need to be powered on constantly. If you keep them closed, they can go multiple hours without needing to be run. What I did knowing Sandy was coming, was to fill all extra space in the freezer with water bottles. These all ended up being frozen before we lost power and helped to keep the fridge cold. Plus, before the storm hit, I turned the fridges to their coldest setting, to get everything as cold as possible.

When I fired up the genny periodically during the day, it was just stabilizing the fridges, as they were holding a lot of the cold already.

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3 hours ago, Sniper22 said:

Plus, refriges don't need to be powered on constantly. If you keep them closed, they can go multiple hours without needing to be run.

They can go multiple days without being run when it's 25 deg outside.

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2 hours ago, Sniper22 said:

Is it 25 degrees inside your house?

No.  I've put freezer items in 5gal home depot buckets and put them on the deck.

5 hours ago, Sniper22 said:

When I fired up the genny periodically during the day, it was just stabilizing the fridges, as they were holding a lot of the cold already.

The more full a fridge and freezer are, the less they need to be run.

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Under what circumstance would one need a bug out bag? Unless your house is on fire, why leave? If you live in a flood zone would be the only reason to have one in this state I think. Any SHTF situation I can think of except a flood I would rather hunker in place.

A fridge at temp will keep temp easy over night if the doors kept closed. More then likely 12 hrs. Like Scorpio64 said, the more stuff in it the longer it will keep. I had to put a piece of duct tape over the fridges door to keep my step son from opening it every time he went past it. :facepalm:

A "hack" for the fridge is freeze a plastic cup half full of water. Put a penny on top of the frozen water and place in the freezer someplace out of the way. This way you'll always know if the power has gone out for any length of time while your away. You can do the same thing with a half full bottle. Freeze it standing up then lay it down. You'll see if any water has melted.

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I just want to point out that for people like us, all of that "emergency food" or whatever you see in buckets, vacuum bags, and MREs is purely a waste of money IMO. Just look at your pantry on a regular day.

Right now I've got cereal, oatmeal, nuts, tuna, canned tomatoes, beans, corn, pasta, whey protein (GTL baby), canned chicken and I'm not even prepping, I'm just grocery shopping. Not including the vegetables and meat in the fridge, sauces and spices, etc...No idea how much you eat or how many people in the house but it would take us a couple weeks to plow through all that food...Some dude's going to be home during Sandy 2.0 trying to stomach some freeze dried meatloaf bullshit out of a vaccuum pack. I'll be eating some bomb ass homemade tacos or a nice spaghetti dinner. Hey I better not gloat, I don't want the zombies to come and take my Barilla! 

Also a funny anecdote, when my wife and I moved into our house we didn't have a fridge for the first few days. BUT we had a foot of snow on the ground outside. We made a big pile and stashed our pizza rolls and frozen ravioli in there for those first couple nights, we still laugh about it to this day. It worked!

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Once again, I have to concur with what @mossburger is advocating in his post above.  Most of us do not need to spend a lot of money for so-called "Prepper food supplies".  All it takes is a sensible visit to a large scale food super market, such as Walmart and select 6-12 (one case) of canned vegitables, fruit, tunafish, etc.  Realistically, you can ignore the printed expiration date on these canned foods since if they are stored in a cool and dry place they will last almost 10 years.  The important aspect of many of these canned foods is that they also contain water which can be used to cook the contents, heating them up, as well as providing dependable potable water as part of your meal.  I also have purchased some canned water that I intend to keep in case of an emergency.  Most of us are aware that water in store bought plastic bottles will over a lengthy period of time, leach some of the chemicals used to create the plastic into the water, possibly making the water potentially hazardous.  That is why it is more dependable to store water over a long period of time in either glass or metal containers, with metal less prone to breakage and lighter weight.  

AVB-AMG

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14 minutes ago, xXxplosive said:

What's wrong with leaching plastics...the ocean is full of it.

BPA (Bisphenol-A) maybe I spelled it wrong. The body thinks it's estrogen, in large enough quantities can lead to "feminine" symptoms such as man breasts, crankiness, lower testosterone which makes it harder to build and maintain muscle, puts you at risk of prostate and testicular cancers too. Same reason I personally avoid all soy products (phytoestrogen) and anything with high-fructose corn syrup (stimulates hunger and blood sugar spikes, aka the perfect storm for fat gain). Yes this means I don't eat half the food in the grocery store. 

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As I previously stated, in order to avoid the potential leaching of detrimental chemicals into the water inside typical store-bought bottled water, I prefer to have canned water stored for an emergency use.  The canned water that I was referring to in my last post that I have purchased is called Blue Can Water.
Here is a link to their web site:
https://www.bluecanwater.com/

AVB-AMG

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