Jump to content
Greenday

The Need to Get into Reloading

Recommended Posts

Any development on this? Loads improving? I generally in any rifle stick to factory dimensions with the exception of only bumping the shoulder back a few thousandths of an inch assuming all the rounds are for the same rifle. The brass will last longer(assuming no annealing)  and be a bit more accurate this way. The powder is generally where I play

Dillon 600 swage tool is great if you only pick up your own brass. I bought 5k once fired LC a few years ago and processed it all. I havent had to reprocess yet but I'm affraid I've picked up more than my own brass so I may have to reswage it all. It would be nice if it were on machine like the 1050. I may be forced to put the 3rd party swager on my 650 to save the time

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure I have solid loads for 52gr Sierra Matchking w/ Varget and 55gr with both Varget and CFE223. I just picked up some H335 and plenty more 52gr MK so that'll be next to try out. I also need to work up a load for 69gr MK's.

Realistically, I need to get a chronograph to be doing this better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/30/2019 at 8:26 PM, Greenday said:

Wouldn't that leave the primer pocket dirty?

If you are cleaning primer pockets you are wasting time... especially if you are not shooting benchrest.

You can clean them if you want, but the vast majority of guys and gals I know from the precision game quit doing that.

Unless you dug up the brass that had been deprimed and then burried, there is little reason to.  It's simply overkill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Greenday said:

I'm pretty sure I have solid loads for 52gr Sierra Matchking w/ Varget and 55gr with both Varget and CFE223. I just picked up some H335 and plenty more 52gr MK so that'll be next to try out. I also need to work up a load for 69gr MK's.

Realistically, I need to get a chronograph to be doing this better.

I am dumbfounded how you or anyone else can get into reloading and subsequently hand loading and NOT having a chronograph.

It's like being a PC tuner without the ability to measure temperature, or a mechanic working on engines and not having access to the ECU or a dyno.

Following the "book" load is all fine and dandy BUT when you are playing near max loads (and generally that is where the majority of people choose to go), you NEED to know the velocity numbers out of YOUR gun, at YOUR elevation, in YOUR shooting environment.

This is far more critical than going down the rabbit hole of cleaning primer pockets, lol. 

And btw, the Chronograph, may just tell you that all of the meticulous case prep work you are doing does not make any difference in the actual results as the powder charge you are at is not in an accuracy node.

Get a chronograph, do a ladder test with your chosen powders and bullets, find the accuracy nodes, load some up, throw them at paper, generally the accuracy node will equate to nice tight groups (due to low extreme spreads and standard deviation), and then go down the rabbit hole to see how much more good prepwork can cut down in group size.

GET or borrow a chronograph.... either a cheap $100 Shooting Chrony/Competition Electronics OR a $500 LabRadar.  But without knowing the ACTUAL velocities, you are shooting with half of the information.

If you want to borrow my chrono, you are more than welcome to... just remember, you shot it, you bought it.  Or you can come shoot with me and try out my new LabRadar.

  • Like 2
  • Disagree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Maksim said:

I am dumbfounded how you or anyone else can get into reloading and subsequently hand loading and NOT having a chronograph.

Yea, it's the next logical purchase in line. I so far base it on groupings and I have one load that consistently provides tighter groups. But using a chronograph would help not only that but enable me to do calculations to estimate bullet flight paths for various ranges. So realistically, I have a powder dialed in at 100 yards for the 52gr MK but since I don't know the velocity, I don't actually know for certain where it'll hit at 200 or 300 yards.

I'd definitely appreciate having someone show me the nuances of using a chronograph.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Greenday said:

Yea, it's the next logical purchase in line. I so far base it on groupings and I have one load that consistently provides tighter groups. But using a chronograph would help not only that but enable me to do calculations to estimate bullet flight paths for various ranges. So realistically, I have a powder dialed in at 100 yards for the 52gr MK but since I don't know the velocity, I don't actually know for certain where it'll hit at 200 or 300 yards.

I'd definitely appreciate having someone show me the nuances of using a chronograph.

Why are you using such light bullets? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, JackDaWack said:

Why are you using such light bullets? 

Because at 100 yards, why would I need anything heavier? Unless it's stupid windy out, 52gr HPBT will do great at 100 yards. Once I go out further, I'll switch to 69gr and 77gr depending on weather.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, W2MC said:

been reloading for years

never owned or even shot over a chronograph

I think I saw one at a range once

LOL.  Of course and I did not even use one myself at first, but then I realized how crazy I was not to use one once I got one. =P

For range ammo, I agree it does not matter much as long as you are not getting squibs and are paying attention to the brass and pressure signs.

But if you are loading match ammo  or for any gun games, you are missing the boat.

Seriously, you go "by the book" for velocity data but it is likely quite a bit off.

@cabalrayz It's okay to disagree but would really mean more if you actually said why. =P 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Greenday said:

Because at 100 yards, why would I need anything heavier? Unless it's stupid windy out, 52gr HPBT will do great at 100 yards. Once I go out further, I'll switch to 69gr and 77gr depending on weather.

If your gun is suited to heavier bullets.

I.e. I have at least one AR with a 1 in 12 twist that won't stabilize 69 and 77.  LOVES 55 and under. @JackDaWack  And of course much cheaper bullets.

For plinking ammo won't really make a difference. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Maksim said:

If your gun is suited to heavier bullets.

I.e. I have at least one AR with a 1 in 12 twist that won't stabilize 69 and 77.  LOVES 55 and under. @JackDaWack  And of course much cheaper bullets.

For plinking ammo won't really make a difference. 

My RAR is 1 in 8 twist. Despite the shorter barrel, I've tested some 77s and seems fine from a cursory glance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Maksim said:

If your gun is suited to heavier bullets.

I.e. I have at least one AR with a 1 in 12 twist that won't stabilize 69 and 77.  LOVES 55 and under. @JackDaWack  And of course much cheaper bullets.

For plinking ammo won't really make a difference. 

That's why I asked.... AFAIK, the reason match bullets are cheaper at low weights is because not many people use them... they seems to be on sale very often. 

Regardless, the barrel rate would suggest it shoots neither light or heavy bullets with optimal performance(at any range)... I understand mileage may vary... 

If your end goal is accuracy, which GD seems to be focused on, then it's a good point of discussion to consider... 

FYI, ive been getting match Hornady bullets from  https://www.midsouthshooterssupply.com

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, JackDaWack said:

That's why I asked.... AFAIK, the reason match bullets are cheaper at low weights is because not many people use them... they seems to be on sale very often. 

Regardless, the barrel rate would suggest it shoots neither light or heavy bullets with optimal performance(at any range)... I understand mileage may vary... 

If your end goal is accuracy, which GD seems to be focused on, then it's a good point of discussion to consider... 

FYI, ive been getting match Hornady bullets from  https://www.midsouthshooterssupply.com

 

 

Yes, lower weight match bullets are cheaper but also partly due to more of them being produced and less overall materials cost. 

Even still though, at shorter distances, say under 300 yards, I doubt anyone will see much difference in group sizes between 55 grain eld match and 77 grain.

Some of the best results I got with 223 was the regular HPBT 55 grain... unless you are shooting longer distances where bullet passes back subsonic, I think shooting the meaningfully more expensive on a % basis bullets is a waste. To each their own though I suppose? and that is why we have some gun owner who can't shoot minute of barn buy guns capable of .25 moa. =P 

But I do buy my 223 bullets in bulk and quite like the xtreme plated 223 55 grain.  Works fine for 95% of shooting under 300 yards here.  

@Greenday let me know if you want to borrow or use my chrono.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, njJoniGuy said:

Maks wanted a new one anyway!

 

3 hours ago, Greenday said:

Yea, if I could use it with help, I'd appreciate it. This way I have it setup correctly.

haha.  Thanks to Creedmoor Sports, I got a Labradar.  What a great piece of equipment! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/7/2019 at 2:07 AM, Maksim said:

If you are cleaning primer pockets you are wasting time... especially if you are not shooting benchrest.

You can clean them if you want, but the vast majority of guys and gals I know from the precision game quit doing that.

Unless you dug up the brass that had been deprimed and then burried, there is little reason to.  It's simply overkill.

Good doctor - I kind of agree and disagree.  The thing that can screw you up is if there is a carbon deposit built up at the base of the pocket.  If so your primer may not seat properly.  Other than that, minimal positive benefits are experienced.  Now in my experience most benchrest guys do clean and uniform primer pockets and flash hole.  But they're crazy anyways.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Old School said:

Good doctor - I kind of agree and disagree.  The thing that can screw you up is if there is a carbon deposit built up at the base of the pocket.  If so your primer may not seat properly.  Other than that, minimal positive benefits are experienced.  Now in my experience most benchrest guys do clean and uniform primer pockets and flash hole.  But they're crazy anyways.

You only have to uniform the flash hole once. You need to make certain EVERY TIME that the flash hole is not clogged by anything (typically corn cob (dry tumble) or stainless pins (wet tumble))

A high primer in an AR round is a slamfire just waiting to happen, so a CLEAN primer pocket is necessary for safety's sake.

Uniforming the primer pocket is a brass-specific decision. So yes, it could be a sign of a crazy mind if it wasn't necessary to begin with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, njJoniGuy said:

You only have to uniform the flash hole once. You need to make certain EVERY TIME that the flash hole is not clogged by anything (typically corn cob (dry tumble) or stainless pins (wet tumble))

A high primer in an AR round is a slamfire just waiting to happen, so a CLEAN primer pocket is necessary for safety's sake.

Uniforming the primer pocket is a brass-specific decision. So yes, it could be a sign of a crazy mind if it wasn't necessary to begin with.

Brian - No argument here! BTW decaping automatically clears the flash hole

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not if its done before tumbling. I used to manually go though all cases and check each would clear with a straight dental pick. Switched to lizard bedding and pieces were too small to stick. Then switched to wet ss pins don't stick either

I suppose you could run a universal decapping die to clear them if you have a spare station before priming

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, George Yetka said:

Not if its done before tumbling. I used to manually go though all cases and check each would clear with a straight dental pick. Switched to lizard bedding and pieces were too small to stick. Then switched to wet ss pins don't stick either

I suppose you could run a universal decapping die to clear them if you have a spare station before priming

I've been going in the order of:

Universal decapping die > Wet Tumble > Resizing Die > Camfer/Debur/Pocket Ream/Pocket Clean > etc.

I find going in that order gets the pockets nice and clean and the stainless steel media isn't a problem getting out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...