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MartyZ

Need advise from electricians

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Ok, all you electricians out there, I need some advise.

I want to add an outlet to the inside of my safe, which in and of itself is not an issue. Pretty simple job.

But, the safe is in a closet and the closet has no outlet in it, so I need to first add an outlet to the closet.

Now, I do have an idea that might make the job pretty easy for me but I just want confirmation that it is a valid option.

The closet shares a wall with a bathroom that was renovated approximately 5 years ago, as part of the renovation a few outlets were moved, instead of running brand new wires they spliced into existing wires to extend the wire to the new outlets. And because they spliced the wires together, they had to do it in a junction box to comply with NJ regulations, and the junction box opens into the closet.

So now I have a junction in the closet that is daisy chained from 1 GFI outlet and then running to another GFI outlet. So I plan to put a standard outlet into that junction box. So that outlet would basically be getting power from GFI outlet and feeding power to another GFI outlet.

Would this be a viable solution??? 

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1 minute ago, MartyZ said:

what if I put a surge protector into the safe? I have plenty of extra surge protector strips.

That would protect the dehumidifier but I don't think the GFI.  Every time it came on is the surging draw onto the GFI.  Put it in the bathroom for a few days and see if it pops the GFI.   

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1 minute ago, BobA said:

That would protect the dehumidifier but I don't think the GFI.  Every time it came on is the surging draw onto the GFI.  Put it in the bathroom for a few days and see if it pops the GFI.   

that's a good idea, I will try that. Thanks

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The safe dehumidifier would be something like a Goldenrod, correct?   I don't think they generate surges.   Not like the compressor-based dehumidifiers used for room dehumidification.

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15 minutes ago, Sniper said:

Why do you need an outlet in your safe?

I have one for the secret Margarita machine.

1 minute ago, 10X said:

The safe dehumidifier would be something like a Goldenrod, correct?   I don't think they generate surges.   Not like the compressor-based dehumidifiers used for room dehumidification.

Well, that could make a difference.

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GFI outlets have two different sets of lines going out the back (for extending the electrical line).  One is labeled load and the other is labeled line.  If the wire coming from the GFI outlet comes out of a line connection it will not be protected by (or "pop") the GFI.  

I would also be very careful connecting a constant heating element to lines already run for a different purpose.  The line for the bathroom is likely a 15 amp circuit and you will be drawing a lot of power.  Bathrooms tend to have a high power consumption since most people use other heating appliances (hair dryer, curler etc) in the bathroom.  Adding additional load is not a good idea.  Especially running new lines off old ones.

The electrician should have run all new lines when redoing the bathroom and segregated them from the rest of the house.  It's not technically illegal/against NEC but it's the best way to run electric.  

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7 minutes ago, GunsnFreedom said:

GFI outlets have two different sets of lines going out the back (for extending the electrical line).  One is labeled load and the other is labeled line.  If the wire coming from the GFI outlet comes out of a line connection it will not be protected by (or "pop") the GFI.  

I would also be very careful connecting a constant heating element to lines already run for a different purpose.  The line for the bathroom is likely a 15 amp circuit and you will be drawing a lot of power.  Bathrooms tend to have a high power consumption since most people use other heating appliances (hair dryer, curler etc) in the bathroom.  Adding additional load is not a good idea.  Especially running new lines off old ones.

The electrician should have run all new lines when redoing the bathroom and segregated them from the rest of the house.  It's not technically illegal/against NEC but it's the best way to run electric.  

The house is only 19 years old, so the lines are not in bad condition. Also, the only thing I currently have running off that one outlet is one of those electric bidet seat covers. Also, I double checked and I was wrong. That line is not running from a GFI outlet but a GFI breaker, a breaker that used to supply a whirlpool tub.

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38 minutes ago, MartyZ said:

The house is only 19 years old, so the lines are not in bad condition. Also, the only thing I currently have running off that one outlet is one of those electric bidet seat covers. Also, I double checked and I was wrong. That line is not running from a GFI outlet but a GFI breaker, a breaker that used to supply a whirlpool tub.

Most likely 20 amp. Ck the breaker size and make sure you install same rated outlet. Other than that you should be honky dory.

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8 minutes ago, Zeke said:

Most likely 20 amp. Ck the breaker size and make sure you install same rated outlet. Other than that you should be honky dory.

What he said.  It's very likely a 20 amp if it was for a whirlpool tub.  Make sure you use a 20 amp outlet (they look like regular plugs but one slot looks like a sideways T) and you should be okay.

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If there's more than one 15 amp receptacle on a 20 amp circuit it meets code (2005 NEC 210.21 Outlet Devices).   

It really just protects the outlet.  If you have a single appliance in the only outlet being used on the circuit and it pulls more than 15 amps (very unlikely, see below) the outlet can possibly fry before the circuit trips.  However it's generally fine as most things pulling that much power are hard wired and most 15 amp outlets (even though rated to 15) will handle 25-30 amps before burning up.

If you're putting one in might as well use one that matches the circuit.

To note, if you got an appliance specifically rated for a 20 amp outlet it cannot be plugged into a 15 amp outlet because of the plug structure (which is why the 20 a outlet is shaped the way it is).

 

EDIT: The primary reason I could see for an outlet overdraw is the use of power strips.  Using one outlet with your entire home theater system - TV, game system, audio electronics etc - can draw more than 15 A from a 15 A outlet.

Edited by GunsnFreedom
Additional note

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i'm confused. I checked my break box and pretty much all my bathroom and kitchen breakers are 20 amp, but all my switches and outlets are 15 amp? Does that make sense?

 

15 amp 120v for lighting branch circuits, 15amp branch circuits for bed rm , family rm               all standard NEC compliant

20amp 120v for kitchen,laundry rm, dinning room, breakfast nook ,bathroom gfis, garage          all standard /NEC compliant

So now I have a junction in the closet that is daisy chained from 1 GFI outlet and then running to another GFI outlet. So I plan to put a standard outlet into that junction box. So that outlet would basically be getting power from GFI outlet and feeding power to another GFI outlet.

The junction in the closet was more then likely to extent the line side (branch circuit feeder) to the new location of the GFCI receptacle ..  You will need to test it to make sure ... either way  ( GFCI protected or now GFCI  you will be ok just shut the power off when you attempt to install the additional receptacle  

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2 hours ago, MartyZ said:

i'm confused. I checked my break box and pretty much all my bathroom and kitchen breakers are 20 amp, but all my switches and outlets are 15 amp? Does that make sense?

Yes, like stated above, it's because you can have a few 15 amp outlets or switches tied to a single breaker. It also depends on the wire size that was ran. 12 G would be a 20 amp circuit, 14 G would be a 15 amp circuit. Hopefully, everything in your house is 12 G and they didn't cut corners.

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Just now, MartyZ said:

What the wife wants, she gets

I guess Handyman prefers using the old digit dig and scrub method.   Me, if there's a hands free washing method, I'm in.  Dry paper just ends up smearing.  I'll take clean as a whistle like an old spice ad.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Well since Marty and Malsua are already out of the water closet, I’m coming out too - I’ve got a bidet as well - and I bought it for myself.

I went hardcore/unheated, because ... MAN CARD.

It’s starting to look like you’re the minority, Handyman.

Bring yourself into the Age of Enlightenment for only $25:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B075MMHQX7?psc=1&ref=ppx_pop_mob_b_asin_title

 

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1 hour ago, Malsua said:

I guess Handyman prefers using the old digit dig and scrub method.   Me, if there's a hands free washing method, I'm in.  Dry paper just ends up smearing.  I'll take clean as a whistle like an old spice ad.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wait........they aren't a drinking fountian?

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Quote

 

3 hours ago, Malsua said:

I guess Handyman prefers using the old digit dig and scrub method.   Me, if there's a hands free washing method, I'm in.  Dry paper just ends up smearing.  

 

 

 

 

 

Uhhhh, WAY too much information. 

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