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Quieter Brake?

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I attended a Carbine class yesterday and my AR was a lot louder than any other at the class. Is there a quieter NJ legal brake out there ? I was the only NJ guy there, had to borrow 30 round mags to run half the drills too, kinda sucked

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Warden is NJ compliant. Only works with SF Brakes though.

These devices are collectively knows as “blast shields” or are sometimes called a “blast diffuser”.

Griffin makes one that will attach to any muzzle device that accepts a mil-spec Blank Firing Adapter (BFA). 

It won’t make anything quieter, but it will direct the sound and “blast” downrange instead of back at the shooter.

Keep in mind that there is no free lunch. The benefit of the redirection of the blast will slightly increase the felt recoil (subjectively).

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30 minutes ago, High Exposure said:

Warden is NJ compliant. Only works with SF Brakes though.

thise devices are collectively knows as blast shield or are sometimes called a blast diffuser.

Griffin makes one that will attach to any muzzle device that accepts a mil-spec Blank Firing Adapter (BFA). 

It won’t make anything quieter, but it will direct the coins and “blast” downrange instead of back at the shooter.

Keep in mind that there is no free lunch. The benefit of the redirection of the blast will slightly increase the felt recoil (subjectively).

Ya, what he said!

HE smert and stuff 

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17 hours ago, High Exposure said:

Warden is NJ compliant. Only works with SF Brakes though.

These devices are collectively knows as “blast shields” or are sometimes called a “blast diffuser”.

Griffin makes one that will attach to any muzzle device that accepts a mil-spec Blank Firing Adapter (BFA). 

It won’t make anything quieter, but it will direct the sound and “blast” downrange instead of back at the shooter.

Keep in mind that there is no free lunch. The benefit of the redirection of the blast will slightly increase the felt recoil (subjectively).

If it's a 223, what's the worry?  

I, at one time, had a brake with front ports... KAW somethingorother.  It was awesome especially with subs.  An RO came over and told me I should check for squibs, it was that quiet at the line.  

And recoil with a 223 AR is really nothing at all, FWIW.  

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Muzzle brakes on low recoil rifles are a phenomenon found in AWB states like NJ, NY, CA etc.  These conversations are not common in free states.  Brakes are a substitute for the look of a flash hider.  For the most part, brakes are an Ersatz penis extension.  In the free states, most folks are happy with the A2 birdcage, which also functions as compensator.  Again, the A2 is NOT a brake, its primary functions are compensator and muzzle blast dispersion. and are commonly replaced with a loud and arguably unnecessary brake for the look.

 

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Hang on now.

Bench shooting or shooting at distance is one thing - you are shooting a single 223/5.56 round at a time, at a slow cadence, from a supported position. 

If you are carrying a .223/5.56 rifle for real world use or are conducting tactical shooting drills or competition type shooting, the use of a brake/comp is absolutely beneficial -you are shooting strings of multiple shots, fired very quickly, generally from a standing or unsupported position. The rapidly repeated blast and recoil, that was minimal for each round starts to stack and that muzzle can move around a lot. The addition of a quality brake/comp during these types of shooting events can be a real advantage.

I guarantee, if I put you at ten yards and had you fire 10 rounds into a B8 Target in under 2.5 seconds, with two different rifles - one with a brake/comp and one without - you would see the difference. 

Manufacturers that provide materiel support to rifle carrying professionals have been looking for a “best of both worlds” solution for a long time - combining the effectiveness of a brake/comp with the signature reducing properties of a flash hider. If the benefit of a brake/comp was artificial, I doubt they would be eating time and money on the research.

 

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6 hours ago, High Exposure said:

I guarantee, if I put you at ten yards and had you fire 10 rounds into a B8 Target in under 2.5 seconds, with two different rifles - one with a brake/comp and one without - you would see the difference. 

Concerning 5.56/.223, I agree with you insomuch as the comp function is concerned.  Brake function, not so much.  Although the MSM and dems have put all of the emphasis on "flash hiders" that term was never a military term, it is a democrat EBR branding scheme.   The A2 birdcage is actually categorized by the military as the primary function being compensation for muzzle rise, and the flash (muzzle blast) dispersion is secondary for preserving night vision.  If recoil on a 5.56 sa/fa rifle was a big problem, then all military rifles would be fitted with brakes.

Now, if we are talking 338 Lapua bolt action, or a 308 SA/FA, or a 50BMG bolt gun, then braking function becomes more relevant, and in the case of 50BMG, virtually necessary.  Recoil management is not the same as controlling muzzle flip.

A brake will let you shoot cartridges with punishing recoil more comfortably, not really more accurately, whereas a comp will help a shooter stay on target, with any caliber, during rapid fire.  Most brakes being bought are pure brakes, no compensation at all.  They are just noisy penis extensions on an AR pattern rifle.

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14 hours ago, High Exposure said:

Hang on now.

Bench shooting or shooting at distance is one thing - you are shooting a single 223/5.56 round at a time, at a slow cadence, from a supported position. 

If you are carrying a .223/5.56 rifle for real world use or are conducting tactical shooting drills or competition type shooting, the use of a brake/comp is absolutely beneficial -you are shooting strings of multiple shots, fired very quickly, generally from a standing or unsupported position. The rapidly repeated blast and recoil, that was minimal for each round starts to stack and that muzzle can move around a lot. The addition of a quality brake/comp during these types of shooting events can be a real advantage.

I guarantee, if I put you at ten yards and had you fire 10 rounds into a B8 Target in under 2.5 seconds, with two different rifles - one with a brake/comp and one without - you would see the difference. 

Manufacturers that provide materiel support to rifle carrying professionals have been looking for a “best of both worlds” solution for a long time - combining the effectiveness of a brake/comp with the signature reducing properties of a flash hider. If the benefit of a brake/comp was artificial, I doubt they would be eating time and money on the research.

 

100% spot on.

Personally, I am 100% okay with loud, even obnoxious brakes if they are functional.  Loud brakes save lives... er was that loud pipes? =P

At a recent range event had a vendor come up with a bunch of their guns with various muzzle devices.

One of the guns had their bigger, competition style muzzle brake which we were shooting at an IPSC sized target at about 85 yards away through a 3x Trijicon.

The gun with that brake did not even get off target while shooting it standing.  Was blown away by how effective it was.

Shooting 223 off of the bench or prone?  Yeah, okay, I get that 100%... but for run and gun, SHTF, or what LEO would deal with, absolutely.

 

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There's a youtube video out there I'll have to find on testing various muzzle brakes. Basically they tested how much recoil was reduced and how loud it was. Essentially, the stronger the brake, the louder it was. So it's give and take if you want a quieter brake.

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23 hours ago, Greenday said:

There's a youtube video out there I'll have to find on testing various muzzle brakes. Basically they tested how much recoil was reduced and how loud it was. Essentially, the stronger the brake, the louder it was. So it's give and take if you want a quieter brake.

There's kind of two exceptions to this. 

1) You can definitely make a loud brake that is not very effective. 

2) Given two similarly effective brakes, one can seem quieter. This is usually due to the design of the brake and if it makes the muzzle report higher or lower pitched, and also how much it concentrates the sound in one direction.  For example there's the JP bennie cooley brake and the miculek brake. They perform comparably, but I'd rather RO people running the JP brake as the miculek is much barkier and seems a lot louder. To the shooter the difference is less pronounced. 

As a note, I like the viper venom brake for a NJ build. In QPQ black it is $30, it's effective, it's not too barky, and it gives good access to the crown so you can take care of carbon build up with it permanently installed. The design is also strong and not prone to erosion. 

 

 

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3 hours ago, YWHIC said:


Muzzle Brake pinned on with blast diffuser

is this type NJ legal? 

 

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My $0.02 is no. 

Based on my experience, pinned and welded muzzle devices are legal because they are not flash suppressors and because, being permanent, they become part of the barrel and eliminate the evil feature of a threaded barrel. 

Pin and welding something with threads to the barrel just replaces the old threads with new threads and you still have a threaded barrel. 

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59 minutes ago, raz-0 said:

My $0.02 is no. 

Based on my experience, pinned and welded muzzle devices are legal because they are not flash suppressors and because, being permanent, they become part of the barrel and eliminate the evil feature of a threaded barrel. 

Pin and welding something with threads to the barrel just replaces the old threads with new threads and you still have a threaded barrel. 

Agree. Still threaded

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23 hours ago, YWHIC said:

No I'd use without. Just thinking compliance and for the prices it's cheap enough. I have a welder here

https://venom-defense.com/ar-15-viper-compensator-1-2-28-qpq-coated/

 

Very nice comp, I use it myself. You will have to drill it to pin and weld, or do the high temp silver solder thing. $20 right now with a 20% coupon. Super cheap. Leaves access to clean the crown too. 

 

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