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Veteran USMC

What 1911s have a slide that is easy to pull back?

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I am looking for a 1911 that will be used for protecting my home. Problem that I have encountered is the slide! Some slides are very hard to pull back because some 1911's are more tightly put together than others.
Can anyone here recommend a 1911 that is not as tightly put together and still reliable? Semper Fi Till The Day I Die! Thank-You!

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You can alter the amount of force necessary to retract the slide on ANY 1911 by changing the recoil spring.

Wolff Springs has a full assortment to choose from.

https://www.gunsprings.com/COLT/1911 GOV'T PISTOL/cID1/mID1/dID1#799

Just beware that the recoil spring should match the power of the ammo you're shooting, otherwise you'll batter (and possibly crack) the frame of your 1911.

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2 minutes ago, Veteran USMC said:

I am looking for a 1911 that will be used for protecting my home. Problem that I have encountered is the slide! Some slides are very hard to pull back because some 1911's are more tightly put together than others.
Can anyone here recommend a 1911 that is not as tightly put together and still reliable? Semper Fi Till The Day I Die! Thank-You!

The tightness of a slide does not make it harder to rack. Those super tight slides actually glide like they are ball bearings on glass.

It's hard to say, but a full size should be the easiest. I'm sure someone will know which models have lighter main springs. My Springfield is heavier than most of my other pistols.

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The slide overcoming the mainspring (for the hammer) adds a fair amount of resistance to the slide. Try cocking the hammer BEFORE racking the slide, and you will notice a difference. 

If it is still too much for you, you may want to consider a striker fired design.

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18 minutes ago, Vicious said:

The slide overcoming the mainspring (for the hammer) adds a fair amount of resistance to the slide. Try cocking the hammer BEFORE racking the slide, and you will notice a difference. 

If it is still too much for you, you may want to consider a striker fired design.

This. 

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I know this isn’t what you asked and honestly I’m not being an ass.  Buy a Glock 19 and even with NJs mag laws it still holds more and put 2000 rounds through it and it’ll just start getting good.  The trigger will wear in and everything will be just right.  
 

WRT a 1911 a fair bit of the initial resistance is the mainspring. 

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I first would advise you not to swap out springs.  The main function of the recoil spring is to return the slide.  Springs are timed to one another.  You go to a lighter recoil spring and you may create feeding issues. A lighter spring will also beat the slide as it goes back.  A heavier spring will beat the frame.  Last I looked Colt listed the same part number for all full size 45 1911s.  Doesn't make a difference if it's a service pistol or a Gold Cup which is designed to shoot lower powered semiwadcutters.  I know I don't know more than the engineers who designed the gun.

I've only been shooting 1911s for over 50 years.  I've always stayed with stock springs with any semiautomatic.

Instead of holding the grip still with your dominant hand try pushing it forward while you're pulling the slide back.  It makes it easier.  

Another solution is build more muscle.  Many new shooters avoid DA revolvers because they have a "long and heavy" DA pull.  Those who say get an action job and lighter springs for a revolver or only looking for instant success.

JMO

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Finger off the trigger
Cock the hammer
Rack the slide while maintaining trigger discipline
Engage thumb safety
Holster it or put it in a drawer

Without knowing much about you or your abilities, as @GRIZ mentioned, messing with spring rates is probably left to someone with some experience in a particular platform.  Changing one will affect several other things.  Looking at the firing pin stop would be what I would recommend as if the bottom is square as opposed to rounded or chamfered it will be harder to rack without cocking the hammer.    

Additionally if you are not familiar with the platform a 1911 is not the pistol that I would recommend as a first timer's home defense firearm.  A full sized 9mm striker fired pistol would generally be my recommendation.  Glock is my personal preferred platform but they're not for everyone.  

Good luck.

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I would also agree with the previous posters. 

If slide manipulation of a 1911 is that much of a problem; you may want to re-think your choice of sidearms.

 

 

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16 hours ago, JackDaWack said:

The tightness of a slide does not make it harder to rack. Those super tight slides actually glide like they are ball bearings on glass.

It's hard to say, but a full size should be the easiest. I'm sure someone will know which models have lighter main springs. My Springfield is heavier than most of my other pistols.

This isn't really true. 

Slides that are fit well glide like ball bearings. Slides form bulk manufacturers that want to make a tight fitting slide cheaply just do the gunsmithing equivalent of squishing it in a vise to add friction. 

While people's warnings about springs isn't wrong, it's also a bit alarmist. Most factory 1911s in .45 come way oversprung. USually 18-20lb. They will work with a 15lb just fine. 

Bully is right that cocking it first manually will reduce the strength required. 

One other thing is technique. If you are having issues due to strength, you don't want to hold the gun with one hand and pull the slide wit the other hand, you want to PUSH the gun wit one hand and PULL the slide with the other hand. Bot arms should be contributing to the effort. 

If your issue is lack of ability to pinch grip, get a slide racker. That's kind of a pain on a 1911. Easiest is get a glock and get one that replaces the rear striker retaining plate.  Similar are available for the M&P and XD. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On 2/26/2020 at 9:33 AM, raz-0 said:

If your issue is lack of ability to pinch grip, get a slide racker. That's kind of a pain on a 1911. Easiest is get a glock and get one that replaces the rear striker retaining plate.  Similar are available for the M&P and XD. 

And there's THIS

Cabela's has it for $15

https://www.cabelas.com/browse.cmd?categoryId=734095080&CQ_search=handi+racker&CQ_zstype=SAYT

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3 hours ago, njJoniGuy said:

This will work but I feel you shouldn't rely on something extra to get your handgun loaded if you intend to use it for self defense.

@Veteran USMC try some different 1911s at a dealer. I know a lot of people who aren't that strong who manage to operate a 1911 well.

If you can't find a 1911 that works for you maybe you should be looking at other handguns.

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On 2/25/2020 at 5:35 PM, Vicious said:

The slide overcoming the mainspring (for the hammer) adds a fair amount of resistance to the slide. Try cocking the hammer BEFORE racking the slide, and you will notice a difference. 

If it is still too much for you, you may want to consider a striker fired design.

Please mods, lock this thread. This was the answer the OP needed.

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