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Anyone have this happen?

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So I went to clean some of my rifles today and noticed a bunch of cotton like cobweb looking things in the corners of my safe. Not sure what it is. It almost looked like mold. I have a dehumid rod that is constantly on so not sure what it could be. Didn’t look like a spiders web, looked more like cotton.  I’ve attached a couple pics. 

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Alien life form... ? :unsure:

If you lookup images for mold... there are plenty of white, fluffy molds that look just like that. So, maybe it is mold... and the dehumidification rod is faulty/undersized? Just a guess. Maybe someone else will have a better suggestion. Good luck!

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Did a quick search. Nothing came up that looked exactly like that, but the closest was white mold or mildew.

Do you know definitely what the historical humidity is in the safe room? A Golden Rod will help with humidity in a safe, but if outside the safe is really damp it may not do enough.

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How To Prevent Molds In A Fireproof Safe: A Maintenance Guide

The primary purpose of owning a fireproof safe is to protect your guns against losses, theft, and fire damage. The next step is to keep the contents of the safe protected from changes that may occur, such as molds. Your jewelry, deeds, and certificates may be exposed to mold, which can lead to losing them. You must take the necessary steps to make sure your safe is in good condition. In this article, we’ll discuss what causes molds and how to prevent mold in a fireproof safe. We’ll also share with you which items require protection from humidity.

  • remove mold and moisture and prevent damp air within the safe. It also stops the musty smell that surrounds the safe.What causes molds Depending on the location of your fireproof safe, you may find that once you open the device, there are musty smell and moisture build-up inside. These substances can lead to mold damage to the items. By knowing what starts mold growth, you have a better understanding of how to prevent mold in a fireproof safe. You can figure out other ways on how to fight it and prevent breakouts.Mold grows from spores, which are everywhere. Spores are seeds that, when it grows, it becomes molds. Spores tend to find an area where there is enough moisture. From there, they will start to germinate and grow into molds. Sixty-five degrees Fahrenheit is more than the ideal temperature for mold to grow.Mold also needs nutrients and water. They can get foods from moisture where the humidity of the air serves as the primary chain. Moisture is everywhere, and it’s in your home, kitchen, clothes, and your body. Molds grow virtually everywhere, from bread, leather, and woods. Molds will continue to grow as long as there are moisture and air.

So, the only solution to fight molds inside your safe is to prevent it from growing.

How to keep the mold out of your gun safeProper sunlight and circulating fresh air can help molds away. But fireproof safe is dark inside and tightly seam across, which do not allow the light and air to flow. This feature can start to grow molds, which targets your documents, and eventually destroying your valuables. But there are simple but effective remedies to shrink and wither these molds.
How to prevent mold in a fireproof safe:

  • Open the safe every week for 20 minutes to let the air out.
  • You should transfer your valuable items in an airtight container before returning them to the safe.
  • Clean and store the safe in a dry area.
  • Do not place the safe in a high humidity area such as the basement.
  • Ensure the airtight seams and seals are intact around the safe
  • Before storing back your valuable items to the safe, ensure that these items are dry.
  • Use desiccant products or dehumidifiers before returning the items to make sure that the device absorbs excess moisture or molds.
  • If you have a new safe, it’s better to acclimatize the unit for 24 hours to prevent trapping excess moisture that results in molds.

As soon as you notice mold starting to grow, you should remove your items from the safe. Clean and deodorize the safe using bleach cleanser to kill the molds within the safe. Before closing the safe, check the corners and areas where moisture may enter. It’s the responsibility of the gun owner to keep the contents of their safe, clean, and dry to maintain the value of their possessions.

 

Humidity control

Controlling the humidity level in your fireproof safe is necessary as it keeps the value of the contents of the safe. While there are easy steps to control the internal temperature of your safe, you need to consider the location of the safe—the spot where you put your safe plays a contributing factor in mold growth.

Condensation around your safe may begin to happen if the location of the safe is not ventilated correctly. Exhaust fans can reduce moisture where water and humidity circulate outside your safe. You can also open the windows to let the fresh air spread into your safe. It’s a good idea to maintain the proper temperature inside your home.

The correct humidity level around the house should be between 30% and 50%, any rate higher than that can put the risk of mold growth to your safe. As we mentioned earlier, you should use a hygrometer to measure the humidity level inside your home.

Here are some items that require protection from humidity:

  • Paper documents and bills
  • Photographs
  • Coins
  • Firearms

 

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I have no idea why they are called dehumidifier rods. They do absolutely nothing to pull moisture out of the air. They just keep the moisture in movement from settling on the firearms.. which is really just a solution for medium humidity levels...

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I did recently get water in my basement where my safe is. I do have a 12” rod but guessing I should get a larger rod and possibly throw a damprid bag in there as well. I’m guessing it is mold. Thanks all

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3 minutes ago, NJSUX said:

I did recently get water in my basement where my safe is. I do have a 12” rod but guessing I should get a larger rod and possibly throw a damprid bag in there as well. I’m guessing it is mold. Thanks all

Do you have an actual dehumidifier down there? 

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29 minutes ago, JackDaWack said:

I have no idea why they are called dehumidifier rods. They do absolutely nothing to pull moisture out of the air. They just keep the moisture in movement from settling on the firearms.. which is really just a solution for medium humidity levels...

Exactly what I see. All they do is produce some heat, but they don't REMOVE any humidity, like a dehumidifier or damprid desiccant type products. If the ambient air around the safe is humid, the rod won't do much to remove it.

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It literally grew back that fast. I’m guessing I need to buy a actual room dehumidifier. The temp inside the safe reads 79% as in the past it would fluctuate high 50% low 60%. I opened the door and let it air out while I was spraying it with mold remover and the temp dropped down to 70 within 5 minutes. I also put a damprid bucket in there and all the minerals have clumped together though it hasn’t dropped any liquid in the bottom of the bucket. 

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45 minutes ago, NJSUX said:

It literally grew back that fast. I’m guessing I need to buy a actual room dehumidifier. The temp inside the safe reads 79% as in the past it would fluctuate high 50% low 60%. I opened the door and let it air out while I was spraying it with mold remover and the temp dropped down to 70 within 5 minutes. I also put a damprid bucket in there and all the minerals have clumped together though it hasn’t dropped any liquid in the bottom of the bucket. 

Temperature was 79%? or 79 degrees... I hopes thats not humidity.

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3 minutes ago, JackDaWack said:

Temperature was 79%? or 79 degrees... I hopes thats not humidity.

Yes 79% humidity. I unplugged my rod and the humidity is staying at 69% witch shows comfort on my thermopro. 

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17 minutes ago, NJSUX said:

Yes 79% humidity. I unplugged my rod and the humidity is staying at 69% witch shows comfort on my thermopro. 

So, the humidity went UP with the rod plugged in, and dropped when you unplugged it? Hmmm...

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10 minutes ago, NJSUX said:

Yes 79% humidity. I unplugged my rod and the humidity is staying at 69% witch shows comfort on my thermopro. 

You want humidity at or below 50%. 

Humidity is relative to living things based on temperature. 70 percent humidity in a room thats 80 degrees will breed mold... easily. Those golden rods may keep the moisture from settling on firearms and lowering the chance of rust and corrosion, along with the preservative oils. 

Damprid buckets is a bandaid for a gushing wound. You might pull humidity levels down 5 percent. 

 

My basement is bone dry. We don't ever get water in it. We have excellent drainage around the house and no seeping water either. This means very little water enters my basement during the year. In the winter all is good, humidity is about 50 percent.. In the summer, without the dehumidifier we easily hit 70%. You will get rust on firearms at 70% if you dont service your firearm regularly or use some super good oils/preventative.

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3 minutes ago, JackDaWack said:

You want humidity at or below 50%. 

Humidity is relative to living things based on temperature. 70 percent humidity in a room thats 80 degrees will breed mold... easily. Those golden rods may keep the moisture from settling on firearms and lowering the chance of rust and corrosion, along with the preservative oils. 

Damprid buckets is a bandaid for a gushing wound. You might pull humidity levels down 5 percent. 

 

My basement is bone dry. We don't ever get water in it. We have excellent drainage around the house and no seeping water either. This means very little water enters my basement during the year. In the winter all is good, humidity is about 50 percent.. In the summer, without the dehumidifier we easily hit 70%. You will get rust on firearms at 70% if you dont service your firearm regularly or use some super good oils/preventative.

With the recent storm we found out our sump pump was shot. I replaced it and haven’t had any issues since. I’m guessing a decent dehumidifier is what I need. 

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13 minutes ago, NJSUX said:

With the recent storm we found out our sump pump was shot. I replaced it and haven’t had any issues since. I’m guessing a decent dehumidifier is what I need. 

Look at it this way, A sump pump only removes liquid water from your basement. The fact you have a sump indicates that water gets into your basement, how much is a matter of the environment. If it storms enough water enters for a sump to be needed, that would tell me that on a normal day ground water is seeping into your basement, again more or less dependent on when and how much it rains. Its not usually enough to be visible, but you can feel the dampness in the air. I would suggest that ANY basement with a sump, would require a dehumidifier running daily in the summer to maintain humidity around 50%. Most concrete foundations not only allow water to seep through, they can also act as a wick. 

Like I said, we don't even have a sump, central air for the main and second floor, no water ever in the basement and I still need a dehumidifier down there. 

4 minutes ago, Zeke said:

And drain it into to sump.

+1

We had to pay extra for a unit that came with a discharge pump for continuous use. 

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