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Ray Ray

Let's talk, Walkie-Talkies

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I am looking for a pair to use in an urban environment.   No need for GPS or color screen.  I just need distance, clarity and the ability to switch channels.  Batteries are okay, but I would prefer rechargeable.  What do you guys recommend?

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.....  uhf .......not akin to distance.....real distance is bf lol....vhf might work....now its gets dicey...

 

What do you want the radios to do....?

 

If I was going to get handie talkies again....  and I am ill prepared at this time...

 

I would buy, analog Motorola Sabers with desxl modules and a keyloader in uhf.

 

 

I have ran many versions of sabers....  analog full apco 25 and encrypted.....  lovely things

 

 

So what do you want em to do ray?.

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Perhaps get a ham radio license?  Of course, you'd then find out how seriously limited these little hand held radios are.

Lacking that, you want FRS/GMRS radios...the good ones are generally made by motorola.

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I’ll check which ones we have at work, but they work through the Nestle production plant very well... reinforced concrete, heavy steel machinery, multi-story facility. Never had an issue other than someone forgetting to turn theirs on.

I know they are Motorola. Will take a picture of the model info/specs on them.

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i have both the baofeng uv5r, and a pair of motorola blisterpack. both give me an approx. straightline of 3/4 mile. i've got nagoya na-771 antennas on the baofengs. while i've only got that distance direct unit to unit....i can wake up a repeater that is known to be 8 miles away.

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Radios can be funny things. Having used UHF and VHF on about 120 acres, with terrain that varies by about 50ft in elevation but is 90% typical NJ forest, there have been times where the radios have struggled to reach 500 feet, and other days when the radios work from extreme edges of the property. (All on freshly charged batteries on warm days).

Any FRS/GMRS radio that claims 15+ mile range is bullshit. Maybe if you are both on top of 2 mountains and zero obstructions or radio noise, maybe, if the sun and moon and clouds and a dozen other things align just so. Otherwise, unless you are in wide open areas with a lake or large field between you should you realistically expect aby significant distance.

A cheap set of Motorolas or Midlands or Baofengs are cheap enough to try, but don't expect a lot...

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direct unit to unit, you are limited by line of sight, barring any obstructions. i think for avg height person, standing on sea level ground, the horizon is only around 3 miles......so without repeaters or skip....you ain't got much chance of going much farther than that

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No matter what brand you get - they are all regulated to the same output power.  You can get more output power by getting something that requires a license - but then you need a license.  FRS/GMRS is limited to 1/2 Watt output.  I think you'll typically get 1 to 2 miles out of FRS/GMRS without a license on flat ground.  In the city it will be less. You can go up to 7 Watts if you get the license and a call sign from the FCC.  I have no idea what's involved or what that costs but you'd then need a more expensive radio designed to transmit at the higher output.

CB is limited to 4 watts.   3 or 4 miles is probably typical with the occasional 5 or 6 mile signal getting through. 

Ham can go a long distance because there are repeaters everywhere.  All others are pretty limited. 

This is the first truck I've owned without a CB radio.  We used to use them around her to keep in touch when we were out in the woods or marshes.  I guess we sort of grew up and don't have as much fun in the mud any more.

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Radio 101 - at least what FRS/GMRS (Family Radio Service/General Mobile Radio Service - its all in the 450-470 mhz range) radios can and cannot do

https://www.buytwowayradios.com/blog/2013/05/radio_101_-_the_truth_about_frs_gmrs_two_way_radio_range.aspx

 

 

Oh, and if you're not licensed...forget ham radio repeaters.  Hams will not talk to you if you haven't got a license.

W2MC

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8 hours ago, Ray Ray said:

All ht's will be 5 watt or less.

 

Your getting a lot of information and is relevant 

 

If you want a mile or less, in relatively flat terrain...say Manhattan you are into mobile radios 25 watt 

 

In vhf uhf height is might....

 

Explain what you need the radio to do, how deep you want to get then you can receive more pertinent information.

 

Just saying I need a pair of radios to talk a mile is not enough information. 

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Maybe I will spend the 80 bucks on a pair and go from there.  

40 minutes ago, USRifle30Cal said:

Explain what you need the radio to do, how deep you want to get then you can receive more pertinent information.

 

Just saying I need a pair of radios to talk a mile is not enough information.

I need a pair of radios that won't break the bank to talk through.

 

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https://www.motorolasolutions.com/en_us/products/two-way-radios/mototrbo/portable-radios/xpr-3000e-series.html

We use these at work. I'm not sure how well they work in heavy concrete structures since the guy I worked with never had his on. We have repeaters and they work okay outdoors. It's 4.5 watts.

I'd prefer something in the 40 watt range, but hey just what you see, pal. 

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9 hours ago, Ray Ray said:

virtually the only way you'll see 27 miles outta those is if you're both on the tops of hills/mountains, and there's zero obstructions in between.

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33 minutes ago, Ray Ray said:

Maybe I will spend the 80 bucks on a pair and go from there.  

I need a pair of radios that won't break the bank to talk through.

 

in what conditions? in the clear? in an urban environment? rural? lots of tall buildings? do you want the comms to be private?(actually ANYthing on the airwaves won't be private).

 

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1 hour ago, ChrisJM981 said:

https://www.motorolasolutions.com/en_us/products/two-way-radios/mototrbo/portable-radios/xpr-3000e-series.html

I'd prefer something in the 40 watt range, but hey just what you see, pal. 

I know that quote, well played.

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