Jump to content

Malice4you

Members
  • Content Count

    1,126
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1
  • Feedback

    0%

Malice4you last won the day on April 20 2018

Malice4you had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

491 Excellent

3 Followers

About Malice4you

  • Rank
    Smartass Extraordinaire!

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location:
    Morris County
  • Home Range
    EFGA

Recent Profile Visitors

3,654 profile views
  1. References usually can't be relatives, but can be friends out of state. Make sure email address is correct. Employer will probably be contacted. Mine has not been in the past, but assume they will.
  2. I've taken a number of women shooting, and something a lot of us forget about is "fit" - most guns are designed around guys. NJ does not help things by limiting options for semi-autos, so what is comfortable for my 6'2" frame is probably less comfortable for a 5'6" teenager or woman. If you have an adjustable stock rifle, that may be best - an improper fit can make shooting less pleasant for smaller statured people. Also remember to show them how to focus the scope (if using one) because their eyes are likely different than yours, and having blurry crosshairs or parallax set wrong would suck for them. I personally always start everyone off with a .22 rifle loaded with a single round (typically on a bipod with a scope), after covering the basics of safety and operation of the rifle. Once proficient with a single shot, I move to multiple rounds in a mag, then .17HMR, .223, etc. Once I (and THEY) are confident in using the rifle, I will start them out on handgun, again single shot typically and usually a .22 - but fit does still come into play. For example, I have a target S&W 22A with large target grips, even for my hands. Most women will not be able to hold it very comfortably, so it is an option they can try, but not an ideal starting gun. By the end of my first day with a former girlfriend, I had worked her up to trying a mosin, and she shot 2 or 3 rounds (with a limbsaver, making the damn thing even longer). Had I started her out on the Mosin, it probably would have been a very short, one shot day. Make sure ear pro is properly worn - if the foam ear plugs are barely in, having extremely loud, ear damaging noises constantly going off will be a turn off. If possible, be off to a side where fewer people are. Some people will be quite self conscious when starting, especially if they aren't hitting things at first. If you have a place to shoot reactive targets, bring them. Those tend to be more fun than simply shooting paper. Something I made up for new shooters: http://malice4you.com/images/realsteel/gunsafety2.pdf A one page (double sided) little handout to try and cover as much as possible while also trying to not be an overload. If I can get people to read that before we even go, they seem to have a better grasp of things, and I'm less likely to forget to mention something important.
  3. For NJ's Clinton WMA, I made a couple target stands out of 2x3s. A single stand should take 3 2x3s, a small box of 2.5" deck screws, and a large piece of cardboard to hang targets on. My first two I made, I used a few lag bolts for base and Kreg screws/pocketholes for rest, but that is unnecessary. I also had some large galvanized nails I was gonna use to hold the legs in place, but after seeing how sturdy these have been, I've never needed em. I used a few super large galvanized nails to hang reactive targets like chunks of wood off the side of the stand (second pic). As long as you have some sort of tape measure, drill, and saw, you can make these things dirt cheap, and they fit in the back seat of (my) car. Because they are two piece, you can transport and store them easier. The original two I made in 2018 have taken a few hits from new shooters with a .22 and/or .17HMR and are still intact with the original wood pieces. Long as you don't use wood glue or strip the heads of (or shoot) the screws, it should be as simple as removing 4 screws to replace any single piece of wood. I chose the size for my stands based on holding two letter pieces of paper. The second one on the right is a scaled down version from the one in the above plans.
  4. Do you have any serious amount of time behind a rifle? You are making assumptions that I'm not sure you should be making without having trigger time. A precision rifle likely does not have a 5 pound trigger pull, and I would hazard a guess that many are sub 3 or even 2 pounds. Even the cleanest, smoothest, crispest breaking trigger ever is not gonna help you with long range accuracy if it is set to 5 pounds, as far as I am concerned. My two .22s are set to 12-14oz and the other I can't measure, but the trigger is capable of 2-8oz pull and I know it is on the low end of that range. Obviously these are for bench shooting, not for field use. I don't know how the 10/22 trigger or barrel attach exactly, but typically those go on/into the receiver (as does the scope), so not sure how you will be practicing much of anything. Also, certain triggers need the gun to be properly assembled to not damage components, so things like firing the trigger could cause problems since there are no parts to interact with like normal. Again, i get it, the wait sucks, not having everything sucks, and we are raining on your parade telling you everything but what you want to hear. You would be FAR better off asking if you can go shooting with someone and buy ammo from them so you have a little *actual* experience to base your wants and needs off of.
  5. I get the appeal of the challenge of a .22 at 300 yards. Currently both my precision .22s (bolt guns) are set up for 100yd zero, and using hold over/unders, I feel confident I can get on paper with first shot at 25, 50, 100, and 200 yards. With a 25MOA base, I could probably do 300yd with some practice, but would need steel gongs and/or a good spotting scope. So I get the appeal, and I get it can be a fun challenge. I just think you gotta work on getting things right at closer ranges first. If your groups are 6" at 100 yards, the only way you are gonna reliably get hits at 300 yards is on a huge 3x3' target. A 10/22 can be a good platform, and a fine gun to start with, but gotta learn to walk before you can run...
  6. 300 yards will be a challenge, not gonna lie. Whatever scope you'll be using will need plenty of elevation adjustment range, and you'll need at least a 25MOA rail I would assume. The way you worded it, it sounded like you were going to use a non-magnified type of sight. The one time I have shot a .22 at 200yd (thanks to Mrs. Peel!), my 16x mil-mil scope on 0moa bases put me just a hair under 8 full mils down from my 100yd zero. A .22 standard velocity round will typically drop in excess of 16 feet at 300 yards (and 4 of those feet are in the last 25 yards). This is something I made for myself to fairly quickly get myself on paper at ranges I'd typically use my .22s at. That blue line about .45 mils below the crosshairs is where I needed to aim using my 100yd zeroed .223rem rifle for 200yds (that's a little over 13" drop) I know you are excited to get started, but I think you do need to slow down a little and do further research before you start spending money on other parts which may or may not help you in your quest. Mrs. Peel is being modest. She did very well without even factoring in that she had to use a borrowed rifle which doesn't fit her particularly well, and that neither of us had any serious experience shooting at 200 yards. While neither of our groups were sub-MOA, with some more trigger time, I can imagine those groups shrinking a bit. Especially when it's her rifle set up and fit properly for her.
  7. I do not own a 10/22, so I can't help much for trigger or barrel. I do know Lilja are supposed to be some top of the line barrels, but no idea if they are made for 10/22s, or if they are within budget if they are. Barrel I was looking up for my Anschutz woulda been $450+ The forum rimfirecentral may have a lot more people who can answer specific 10/22 questions. What do you consider long range for .22? Are you doing aperture sights of some sort, and if so, do the barrels you linked have a mounting point for the front sights? Bull barrels often do not have a front sight mount.
  8. There is ZERO reason to order any of the accessory parts to an FFL - you will be wasting your time, their time, and their space for something that is legal to own. And probably wasting extra money too, unless you have some agreement with an FFL. Don't order a magazine over 10 rounds. Keep track of the number of evil features, like threaded barrel and folding stocks and grenade launchers and bayonet lugs. (You know, the real big problems in NJ - pretty sure my town loses at least two dozen people a night to drive-by bayonettings.) The only thing that you should need an FFL for will be the receiver and possibly gunsmithing if required, or I suppose if you REALLY gotta have a 25rd magazine body and need it pinned to 10rd. It is up to YOU to research what is legal if you are building a rifle once you can legally obtain that receiver. There are threads covering exactly what you can and can't have. Start here:
  9. I had a really good Taylor Ham n cheese on a hamburger bun recently, and I think I prefer that over a roll. Or was thread drift about shotguns for a few posts OK now?
  10. I guess they sold the $295,000 one - i don't see that in the list anymore. Unless it was a new one. It is nice of them to put a few on sale to $68,500 from $73,000. Makes it a steal, a gun for the everyman.
  11. I suggest you check the prices of some of these expensive pipes then... http://secure.griffinhowe.com/usedgun-sg.cfm
  12. I was too cheap to buy a whole new setup for that rifle, so I went with bore snake. Long as you run it often, I'd try for every 150-200 rounds, seems to have been keeping things in check for me.
  13. The only guns I've willingly used steel case ammo in were my Mosin and my AK. Based on what I have seen, I could use steel in everything and should hold up fine, but I would prefer not to. Might be fine for some cheap SHTF scenario, but I'd prefer to stick to aluminum minimum for cheap ammo. My 9mms have all eaten it up fine with zero issues over the years.
  14. Isnt the rule after 3285 days with no reply the FFL can release the gun to you?
  15. Been waiting over 9 years to get whats sitting in NICS jail. Hope i get a call today...nothing yet from Friday afternoon. Edit: Got the call around 3 today that my background check went through. Was submitted around 2pm on friday.
×
×
  • Create New...