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      NJGF's Gun Range & Store Database   05/23/2017

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bbk

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bbk last won the day on March 25 2012

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  1. Great options already posted, and here is another if you're interested. If you are considering a 14.5" barrel (carbine or mid-length gas systems), consider BCM. They have options on all of their 14.5" uppers where they will pin a muzzle device to make the upper a non-NFA item (if you were to put it on a lower). You would have to do your own research into the muzzle devices, but plenty of their options have been considered good to go for NJ. Pro-tip: Of the two gas-lengths, there are more options with the mid-length 14.5" uppers. I would also recommend choosing an upper without a front sight post/block since those have the bayonet lugs on them. You can forget that previous sentence if you have someone in mind that can shave the lug off for you of course. I personally have an NJ-compliant upper that I ordered directly off their site without any modifications needed. To boot, BCM is a reputable manufacturer.
  2. Its good on Sig to address the issue, as its happening. While I'm actually starting to shift away from striker-fire pistols as a whole for my purposes (CCW), I'm with HE 100%. IMO, it shouldn't matter what you do-- the pistol is defective. And that defect is dangerous, bottom line. The only people who are making it a pissing contest are the ones wanting to. Everything else is just facts.
  3. Indeed a great post. I've done a few long distance trips out west, notably in and through Nevada, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, and Texas. While OC is not as common as I thought it would be at first, the communities and law enforcement had a much deeper understanding and appreciation for firearms. The times I would see someone walking around open carry, nobody was dropping babies and running-- or even batting an eye at that. With that said, I did see my fair share of pretty shoddy carrying techniques (mostly pistols jammed into a pocket, and either printing or looking like it was about to fall out). I even saw a gentleman who's pistol straight dropped out of their pocket onto the floor-- and didn't notice until someone else tapped him on the shoulder. Living in CA though, while I was fortunate enough to get my CCW (there's been a huge resurgence as of late with many county sheriffs issuing), I still am very much about deep concealment. I plan on some more trips this winter, and potentially a cross-country. While I carry probably 75% of the time (work has me at a lot of gov facilities and universities where I can't), I've become much more use to it. Still, I haven't winter carried yet, and while its usually cool enough to wear a light hoodie or jacket at the least year-round, I'm interested how that will change things.
  4. Working with a few team guys, I can attest to the fact that they all advocate IDPA, and use it as a learning tool. We also have had a few competition shooters come in and give instruction. So, there is definitely merit to heavy hitters learning a thing or two from match shooters. But as many have said, intention of execution is two different stories, and is comparing apples to oranges. Shane pointed out a great point of how the operational world is starting to utilize tips that started out from match shooting, like red dots on secondary systems-- but not for the same reasons (i.e. target acquisition and speed). Red dots on pistols are being adopted in spades because of their ease of use with NVGs. In the end, its all good training-- everything else is stick measuring.
  5. Believe it or not, CCW issuance has been trending up here in CA where I'm at currently (NorCal). I thought I was going from bad to worse coming out here, and in ways I have (I opted to not play the AR games), but I have my CCW in CA and NV, which works out as I'm constantly traveling around the two states for work and play.
  6. Teraflops, all the rage. Early tech specs are pointing to Project Scorpio (Microsoft) being "better" than PS4 Pro, but one has to consider the licensing/exclusives and community as well. One advantage to Microsoft games now and moving forward is that if you purchase them for Xbox or PC, you get them for both. Do I need multiple copies of one game? Nah, but its cool (and the saves are cross-platform). In the end, I am a PC guy though, not because I am an elitist, but because I prefer a mouse and keyboard, and its where my friends game.
  7. I agree with Apple's stance on the matter. If it was an algorithm software, or something more brute-force that targeted the passcode issue, I would argue otherwise. But creating a backdoor that would undermine the security for the entirety of iOS that powers all of the Apple mobile devices? That is a ridiculously powerful and scary skeleton key, especially in an age where the cyber battlefield is pretty much even across allied and foreign nations and agencies, as well as private security companies, and private citizens (all of whom are engaging in white/grey/black hat). There is an exponentially larger impact here, and as much as I want whatever information is on that phone available for authorities, there is a way to do this without jeopardizing the security of over 700 million+ devices (many of which are in use by major companies, DOD civilians, military, and other users that have access to highly sensitive information). As for Apple having any responsibility or duty to do this-- in fact, just like telecommunication companies eventually pushed back, private companies with this type of influence and power have a responsibility, just as much as any private citizen, to keep our government in check. Nothing good will come out of this if Apple caves and is forced to create this back door.
  8. Sure, defend against those who wish to kill us-- I have no qualms about that, as I partook in that act myself as a servicemember. However, the illogical and illegitimate aspect is when Americans/Westerners demonize Islam and Muslims as a whole. THAT is my issue.
  9. You have to be careful with transliterations of the Qur'an. There are maybe only a handful (if that) English transliterations that are actually respected. The majority of the versions you find in public bookstores aren't really accepted. And the other risk you run is taking things out of context. Like the Bible, which I've read (NIV and KJ), anything can be taken out of context and bastardized. Same reason why white-supremacy groups and WBC aren't really taken all that seriously-- why is Islam not given the same thought? Because extremists (who the overwhelming majority of Muslims will speak out against) are victimizing innocents? Reserve your hate for those who commit the act, and not the misinterpretation they do it in.
  10. Nobody knows the actual reasons for this violence, so, conclusions now are purely speculation. To say that this is a matter of Islamic extremists is wholly useless. Reaching that conclusion is not far-fetched, sure, I can agree with that-- but to state it as a fact is wrong. And no, Islam doesn't state that people should "convert or die," or to even attack infidels. So, read the Qur'an or talk to an Imam or a scholar before misstating things.
  11. You guys spewing about this being a religious war, first get the legitimate facts on what you are berating. Also, if you want to take the discussion there, go beyond the American perspective, and attempt to see the global aspect of things. I say these things because you guys risk sounding like idiots in a public forum.
  12. I've been following that imgur/crowd-source since Monday... it's seemed far more provoking and informative than anything on the telly
  13. I had the Vortex 1-4x PST for a few years, and I really, really *wanted* to like it. The Vortex was not, like many variable power scopes, a true 1x-- more like 1.1-1.3x. Was this a huge deal? No. The deal breaker for me was that it was heavy. I figured I'd sack up and just deal with it, but after a series of progressively challenging training courses-- there is just something miserable about lugging around a 10-12lb rifle. This is relevant because side-by-side, shooting the rifle with the 1-4x was just as fast and maneuverable, with both-eyes open shooting, as with an RDS. But factor in exhaustion, and the fine motor skills deteriorate much faster. As for the cheek weld and getting scope shadow, its something that can be trained past. What I did was put a small piece of red duct tape exactly where my cheek weld should be, and I practiced until I got it down. Once I did that, I theory-crafted and trained irregular positions until I was comfortable. Its preference. I don't think you could go wrong with the 1-4x, just don't underestimate how the littlest of weight gained can throw you off entirely.
  14. Now that I've had sufficient time with my PRO, its a tough call between a PRO and T1. Like HE said, if the two were priced the same, I'd go with the T1-- but for the value, a PRO hands-down. A PRO vs. Vortex? I couldn't honestly say as I've only fired a friend's who had a Vortex. Seems well enough for range purposes; but I'm not sure how robust the Vortex is long-term. I have nothing against Vortex (owned some of their glass), I just can't judge that specific product. In a vacuum though, I'd take my PRO over most products on the market in a heartbeat.
  15. I feel for you. I'm the same age, going through the same problem. Even with professional experience and VP, and a Bachelors, there is still difficulty in getting into certain career fields. Maybe I'm being too selective, but I would rather be a nomad then be stuck in a cubicle all day for the foreseeable future (I turned down a sales/office position recently). The way I see it, I just have to keep grinding, and the opportunities will come. What I keep reminding myself is to not get tunnel vision in the process, and always keep in mind alternative options. Having recently finished school, I'd rather not jump into my pursuits for a JD/MA as I'd rather work; but I can't dismiss the notion entirely as it would be a disservice to myself. Just keep your chin up, we'll make it through just fine as long as we keep pushing forward.