Barms

Best way to secure bedroom window 2nd floor

26 posts in this topic

Just had a new shed built.   The most efficient place to put it was next to house.  It is unfortunately now below a window.   It would take a ladder to get on top of the shed and its a bit of a stretch to reach from  shed roof to window.   Of course step one is keeping that window locked.   Should that be 99.9% suffice?   Is a locked window the bane of a 2nd story burglar?   I just thought of calling my alarm guy and adding sensors to that window.  That would probably be good enough.  But oustside of screwing bars to that window anybody have any other ideas?   I think I will call the window manufacturer and see if my brand comes in unbreakabke glass.   

But maybe I'm going too crazy now if a guy had the bells to break a window he'd just break the first floor window anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In a good amount of dwellings the second floor is not alarmed. Thieves know this.

I would alarm.

As far as glass break,

http://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/company-us/all-3m-products/~/3M-Scotchshield-Safety-Security-Window-Films-Ultra-Series-for-Residential?N=5002385+3292716682&rt=rud

 

 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most home robberies I hear about are teenagers or scumbag junkies.  They take the fastest and easiest route.  They don't get all Hollywood with grabbing hooks and repelling robes.  The shed would make an easier path though.  Under the heading of "it wouldn't hurt" go for the alarm since you already have a system and a guy to do it.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depending on your system, alarming the one window can be easy or really really hard. Then I would recommend an auxiliary lock for the sash that automatically locks when the window is closed. If you can be sure the window of locked as much as possible add a glass break sensor to your alarm system in that room so if a window breaks it sets off the alarm. They're cheap and they work. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can get one of those cheap vibration alarms from Harbor Freight. They come 2 in a package for something like $6. 

Most burglars don't like to or know how to deal with alarms of any type.  If they hear an alarm go off they'll beat feet.  

What you do depends on how much you want to spend.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Get a dog.

 

 

 

Winner winner chicken dinner.

 

Basically every person that wants to buy a gun for "protection" needs to get a dog first.

 

I always suggest they get an FID and then Take some classes. In the mean time get a german shepherd. Rescue one.

 

Everyone should have a dog. Get two.

 

f3f5c550390d0ff8d48def2522bb25a4.jpg

 

 

 

Taking a blasé security attitude by using Tapatalk Pro

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/27/2017 at 11:40 PM, Danno said:

Get a dog.

 

 

On 5/28/2017 at 0:52 AM, Walt of Destiny said:

 

 

Winner winner chicken dinner.

 

Basically every person that wants to buy a gun for "protection" needs to get a dog first.

 

I always suggest they get an FID and then Take some classes. In the mean time get a german shepherd. Rescue one.

 

Everyone should have a dog. Get two.

 

f3f5c550390d0ff8d48def2522bb25a4.jpg

 

 

 

Taking a blasé security attitude by using Tapatalk Pro

I should have said in my last response two things most burglars don't want to deal with is alarms and dogs.

That's an easy answer but not easy to do.  Getting a dog includes caring for it and can be a radical lifestyle change for many.  Dogs have to be let out, fed, and cleaned up after on a daily basis.  There's no spur of the moment getaways as you have to make arrangements for the dog if you can't take it with you.  Getting a dog is similar to having a kid but you can't stick your kid in a crate or lock them in a room if you're going out for a few hours.  All dogs can't have the run of the house when no one's home.

Now I know some that call themselves "dog people" that can just go out and get another when their dog dies.  I'm not one of them.  My last dog died at age 13 almost two years ago.  She was a great defender of her turf.  When she got sick I spent several thousand dollars on a rescue dog to find out she couldn't be saved.

There are plenty of dogs in shelters that are there because someone suggested to their former owners "get a dog" for some reason.  A gun or an alarm is easier to take care of and won't give you the same amount of emotional distress if it dies.

If you get a dog get a rescue.

6 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, GRIZ said:

 

I should have said in my last response two things most burglars don't want to deal with is alarms and dogs.

That's an easy answer but not easy to do.  Getting a dog includes caring for it and can be a radical lifestyle change for many.  Dogs have to be let out, fed, and cleaned up after on a daily basis.  There's no spur of the moment getaways as you have to make arrangements for the dog if you can't take it with you.  Getting a dog is similar to having a kid but you can't stick your kid in a crate or lock them in a room if you're going out for a few hours.  All dogs can't have the run of the house when no one's home.

Now I know some that call themselves "dog people" that can just go out and get another when their dog dies.  I'm not one of them.  My last dog died at age 13 almost two years ago.  She was a great defender of her turf.  When she got sick I spent several thousand dollars on a rescue dog to find out she couldn't be saved.

There are plenty of dogs in shelters that are there because someone suggested to their former owners "get a dog" for some reason.  A gun or an alarm is easier to take care of and won't give you the same amount of emotional distress if it dies.

If you get a dog get a rescue.

There are numerous, breed specific rescue organizations. I've fostered a few.  

Everyting you say, Griz, it true... as much as it hurt when my last 3 GSD passed, I always got another after the self-prescribed  mourning period passed. I can't seem to picture my home without one. Nor my family without an unbiased, unapologetic, always on, protector that would give his life unflinchingly for them.  Should someone looking to do us harm,  get past him, I know he's dead. His sacrifice would buy me and my family precious moments to prepare to defend our lives. Like any of us would sacrifice ourselves for our families to give them a chance. 

To some, dogs are a hassle. I just got back from a walk in the woods with Bruno and me drenched from head to paw. To me it's a pleasure sharing a home with this noble beast. 

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My last 3 dogs were rescues.

Lady was devoted to my wife.  She played off whatever my wife was feeling about a situation.  If left alone she was agressive if she didn't know you.

Tramp was the dumbest dog I ever knew but he always wanted to be with me.  He would play like a puppy until exhaustion.  He greeted everyone with a bark and a charge that would result with him jumping on you.  That's because he thought everyone came to play with him.

Lacy was all business.  Minimal requirement for attention.  She concerned herself with protecting her turf 110%.  Just ask the dead opossums she would deliver to the porch when I let her out at night.

Three different dogs. Three different styles.  All were great watchdogs.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also need to mention Buster.  When I pulled in the driveway with a different car from work (driveway couldn't be seen from backyard) I knew Buster was in the yard because he'd start barking.  I would yell "Buster, it's me" and he would quiet down.  

Rescued Buster before he was sent to a shelter.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know a lot of men have a certain disdain for the small toy dogs.. but they too can be fabulous "watchdogs" though obviously not intimidating "guard dogs". My last dog - a rescue - was a 10 pound ball of fluff. Smartest dog ever and NO ONE stepped into my yard without him alerting me. He was on duty at all times. It was nice having that advance notice. I miss him.

Sadly, the one I have now - same size, same breed - is totally lax, like a hippie. Repairmen come right into the house, talk to me for a few minutes and then they walk towards the basement and are shocked to see her sitting there in the kitchen, wagging her tail at them. Worst watchdog EVER. She doesn't make a peep (unless it's a cat or dog that steps into the yard, of course, and then she raises holy hell). Sometimes it's just the luck of the draw what you get.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mrs. Peel said:

I know a lot of men have a certain disdain for the small toy dogs.. but they too can be fabulous "watchdogs" though obviously not intimidating "guard dogs". My last dog - a rescue - was a 10 pound ball of fluff. Smartest dog ever and NO ONE stepped into my yard without him alerting me. He was on duty at all times. It was nice having that advance notice. I miss him.

Sadly, the one I have now - same size, same breed - is totally lax, like a hippie. Repairmen come right into the house, talk to me for a few minutes and then they walk towards the basement and are shocked to see her sitting there in the kitchen, wagging her tail at them. Worst watchdog EVER. She doesn't make a peep (unless it's a cat or dog that steps into the yard, of course, and then she raises holy hell). Sometimes it's just the luck of the draw what you get.

Luger is similar to your previous dog. He's on guard 110% of the time. He protects all 3 acres and beyond (just ask the white GSD that he attacked last 4th July) no one can come on the property uninvited without being confronted by luger. However once we're off the property he's all good with all other dogs and people. 

20170529_145124.jpg

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Mrs. Peel said:

I know a lot of men have a certain disdain for the small toy dogs.. but they too can be fabulous "watchdogs" though obviously not intimidating "guard dogs". My last dog - a rescue - was a 10 pound ball of fluff. Smartest dog ever and NO ONE stepped into my yard without him alerting me. He was on duty at all times. It was nice having that advance notice. I miss him.

Here is my little 10lb four-legged alarm. Her name is Caana and she lets us know if anyone comes on the property.

4B512D07-C04C-4298-8FAC-25563A7004D5_zps

 

4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Newtonian said:

I had a security expert (and forum member) case my house a few months ago. He said essentially to forget about the second floor.

That's how he plans on getting back in.

5 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now