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Guys, where do you shop for reloading supplies? 

Online I’m using https://reloadingunlimited.com and https://www.powdervalleyinc.com, but even they don’t have primers anymore. Some rifle bullets and powder ares still available though. 

So I’m looking for local retailers in NJ or PA. Any advice? 

 

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13 hours ago, Amazon said:

Guys, where do you shop for reloading supplies? 

Online I’m using https://reloadingunlimited.com and https://www.powdervalleyinc.com, but even they don’t have primers anymore. Some rifle bullets and powder ares still available though. 

So I’m looking for local retailers in NJ or PA. Any advice? 

 

Primers are a really tough purchase right now.

For the rest of your reloading needs, Shyda's Outdoor Center in Lebanon PA (20 minutes east of Hersheypark) is a slice of reloading heaven.

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1 hour ago, Smith said:

I liked Dillon 750. Anyone know what’s good price? 

Retail is $650 from Dillon, though they have it on backorder.  I don’t think you’ll ever find it discounted, and its a new enough model that you won’t find many used    The model 650 that preceded it is also very capable, and occasionally you’ll find a used one. 

As you move to faster Dillon presses, the caliber conversion hardware costs more and it takes longer to to change over to a new caliber.  That may or may not be a consideration, depending on how you plan to use it. 

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48 minutes ago, RUTGERS95 said:

I bought one of these along with a bunch of accessories and it just sits and collects dust. I will stick with my Dillon presses.  The Hornady LNL I have required too much efforts to keep it running smoothly. There was always something out of adjustment. It is sturdy and well built but doesn't work for me. I like simple. Maybe I didn't give it enough of a chance. I may set it back up now that I have a proper dedicated reloading room.

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21 minutes ago, JC_68Westy said:

I bought one of these along with a bunch of accessories and it just sits and collects dust

I would not hesitate to use that for pistol ammo.  Once you get it set up, and work out it's peculiarities, I bet it will serve you well.

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1 hour ago, Sota said:

I got a bunch of SLA batteries that are EOL for their intended purpose.

Are you talking lead recovery?  I had always understood that lead from batteries was no good for casting — I’m really not sure why — I’m sure we’ll get an education soon

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26 minutes ago, Heavyopp said:

Are you talking lead recovery?  I had always understood that lead from batteries was no good for casting — I’m really not sure why — I’m sure we’ll get an education soon

OK, you piqued my curiosity! The most informative explanation I found was a pinned thread on a reloading forum site: http://castboolits.gunloads.com/showthread.php?40769-Why-Car-Batteries-Are-Dangerous

Of course, I can't attest to its accuracy, but it wasn't the only item I found saying this either. Short answer: the argument against it is that there are other additives to the lead used in batteries which causes them to emit a very toxic level of vapors when the lead is being melted down. Of course, this post was specifically about automotive batteries - not sure that's applicable to all SLA batteries. It does sound like anyone thinking of doing this should do some very careful research and weigh the risks vs. the benefits.

Not sure if this helps or not -  I'll let others weigh in who may know more about this topic!

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4 hours ago, JC_68Westy said:

I bought one of these along with a bunch of accessories and it just sits and collects dust. I will stick with my Dillon presses.  The Hornady LNL I have required too much efforts to keep it running smoothly. There was always something out of adjustment. It is sturdy and well built but doesn't work for me. I like simple. Maybe I didn't give it enough of a chance. I may set it back up now that I have a proper dedicated reloading room.

It is quirky !!!!

 

Once you get it setup and once you KNOW the quirks..it's a reliable unit.  

5 hours ago, RUTGERS95 said:

Yes...that's what i run with a case feeder...

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On 10/18/2020 at 2:00 PM, RUTGERS95 said:

Based on my limited experience I would say yes. I use lee press and dies and they just work. Especially if you load modest quantities. Be sure to get a trickle if you are into precision shooting. 

And If you just want to try the taste, here are the essentials:

- Press (lee comes with priming arms).

- Full set of dies, or just shell-holder, sizing/depriming die and bullet siting die. 

- Scale. 

That’s it. I mean that and a lot of common sense and attention to detail. 

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On 10/18/2020 at 4:57 PM, Scorpio64 said:

I would not hesitate to use that for pistol ammo.  Once you get it set up, and work out it's peculiarities, I bet it will serve you well.

Yup, love mine for pistol. I run a single stage Hornady iron for rifle. The LNL has too much stage flex, it runs fine once you get it dialed in but if you don't run all cases at once, or change up you stations, you might find a three-5 thousands difference in sizing or seating depth.

If you never reloaded before and jump to an LNL, 650 or 750 you're asking for headaches... ask me how I know. 

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14 hours ago, JackDaWack said:

Yup, love mine for pistol. I run a single stage Hornady iron for rifle. The LNL has too much stage flex, it runs fine once you get it dialed in but if you don't run all cases at once, or change up you stations, you might find a three-5 thousands difference in sizing or seating depth.

If you never reloaded before and jump to an LNL, 650 or 750 you're asking for headaches... ask me how I know. 

Bulk load 5.56 all day on an lnl....  7.62, 30-06? Not so much...

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2 hours ago, RUTGERS95 said:

appreciate the feedback gents, lots to ponder

For new reloaders, I am a HUGE proponent of single stage presses. With a single stage you're only focusing on one thing at a time.  When you get to the point where single stage reloading is downright boring, you should consider a turret or progressive.

I still use my single stage for match grade 6.5 Creedmoor loads.

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2 minutes ago, Squaregrouper said:

For new reloaders, I am a HUGE proponent of single stage presses. With a single stage you're only focusing on one thing at a time.  When you get to the point where single stage reloading is downright boring, you should consider a turret or progressive.

I still use my single stage for match grade 6.5 Creedmoor loads.

My recommendation to start is a lee 4 hole turret.  You just deactivate the indexing and you get the simplicity and focus of single stage, but the convenience of not having to change out dies off a turret. Then if you move on to a progressive, you can keep tool heads set up for things you do in small volume.  

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10 minutes ago, Squaregrouper said:

For new reloaders, I am a HUGE proponent of single stage presses.

I quite agree, that's the place to start.  They are inexpensive and simple.

And, it's not a wasted investment.  You'll always have a use for it, at least if you load rifle calibers.   If you load much pistol ammo, you'll want to move to a progressive for that, but keep the single stage for rifle, or perhaps just for operations like resizing the big cases.

 

Edit:  I haven't used a Lee 4 hole turret, but if operating as a single stage press it could accomplish the same thing.  You could also do the same with a Dillon 550-it doesn't auto-index, you flip the shell carrier forward with your thumb after each handle pull.

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10 minutes ago, 10X said:

I quite agree, that's the place to start.  They are inexpensive and simple.

And, it's not a wasted investment.  You'll always have a use for it, at least if you load rifle calibers.   If you load much pistol ammo, you'll want to move to a progressive for that, but keep the single stage for rifle, or perhaps just for operations like resizing the big cases.

 

Edit:  I haven't used a Lee 4 hole turret, but if operating as a single stage press it could accomplish the same thing.  You could also do the same with a Dillon 550-it doesn't auto-index, you flip the shell carrier forward with your thumb after each handle pull.

The Lee Turret press is different. I cannot use my 550 as a single stage efficiently. The lee allows the user to disable indexing and use the press as a true single stage. They move the turret to change the stage, not the shell holder. It stays in place. I completely agree that you should start with a single stage press. Learning to reload safely and methodically will result in higher quality reloads. You can't go wrong with a Rockchucker.

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6 hours ago, RUTGERS95 said:

appreciate the feedback gents, lots to ponder

I have an older Spar T turret press i can lend you to get the feel for it ..if you want !

 

Guy gave it to me 20 years ago and was what i learned on, doing 32acp !

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I have Lee Loadmaster (Modified), Lee Turret, Lee Breech Lock Challenger, an Old 45 Degree offset Challenger and the APP

All work just fine for me and make bullets that hit targets like all the rest of the Reloading Presses.

I have made thousands and thousands of pistol and rifle ammo. In fact i wore out my first Loadmaster.

Reloading lets you work the loads right down to the absolute sweet spot for your gun. Pretty amazing thing actually.

My son out shot a friend of his using reloads with a Hipoint 45 it  was more accurate than his friends Glock. 

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5 hours ago, USRifle30Cal said:

I have an older Spar T turret press i can lend you to get the feel for it ..if you want !

 

Guy gave it to me 20 years ago and was what i learned on, doing 32acp !

you are the man and I appreciate it!   I have to set up a table first but will let you know.  Much much appreciated

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16 minutes ago, RUTGERS95 said:

you are the man and I appreciate it!   I have to set up a table first but will let you know.  Much much appreciated

Once you see the pleasures, benefits and savings of reloading, you will never go back!:)

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On 10/19/2020 at 5:19 PM, Amazon said:

Based on my limited experience I would say yes. I use lee press and dies and they just work. Especially if you load modest quantities. Be sure to get a trickle if you are into precision shooting. 

And If you just want to try the taste, here are the essentials:

- Press (lee comes with priming arms).

- Full set of dies, or just shell-holder, sizing/depriming die and bullet siting die. 

- Scale. 

That’s it. I mean that and a lot of common sense and attention to detail. 

 

I'd add a caliper to the list.  And a notebook, makes it so much easier when you log the various bullet type / weight, powder used, charge weight, powder disk size, seating depth, etc...

I only load for handguns.

Been using the Lee 1000 for over 30 years, had a connecting link break after 20 something years, and Lee replaced with a newer version of the part for no charge.  So that's one heck of a 2 year warrantee.  Older part was a cast metal, newer was solid metal.

I'd guess the newer version of the press would have many of the kinks corrected by now, I don't deprime on the press, spent primers had nowhere to go.  I don't use the auto prime, it was never 100% reliable, too many wound up crushed in,  or even backwards on occasion.  I guess that's why they only specified CCI or Remington primers, less likely to go off on ya when something goes wrong.  Some of the shell plate assemblies I have don't have the ability to detect if a case is in place and would feed a primer regardless and that was always a pain. Also stopped using the case feeder tubes, I just manually place each case, the nuts holding the case feeder on the press would always seem to loosen up causing problems with feeding.

I also went with shell plate carrier assemblies and turrets with the dies installed for each caliber I load.  Changing just a shell plate was a pain with having to always adjust the indexing.  An no way was I going to use one turret with multiple dies, it takes too long to adjust all the dies each time.

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Caliper, of course! I forgot this mandatory tool. Regarding the new Lee, the priming is still kinky.   I’m using it with CC 7.62 military primers so far, but soon will try Federal. 

While on the subject - https://reloadingunlimited.com/ has CC military LRP as of now. You may have to buy some powder to bundle with the primers to get trough the checkout. 

 

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